US presidential race issues: Foreign policy

The 2016 Elections and Foreign Policy

It's been a crazy year for foreign policy -- and as the 2016 election inches closer, where do the candidates stand on some of the biggest international issues?

First up: ISIS. As the terrorist group continues to advance across the Middle East the 2016 candidates have been weighing in. While the GOP doesn't think President Obama is doing enough to fight ISIS, many presidential hopefuls are hesitant to call for more troops on the ground.

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Except for Donald Trump of course - who thinks we should send more of our own to "knock out" their sources of oil.


And on the Democratic side both Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders believe the fight should be lead by those in the Middle East.

Speaking of the Middle East, Syria's civil war has pushed 4 million people to flee the country.

While Germany has accepted over 50,000 refugees in the past week alone, the U.S. is expected to take in a mere 10,000 in the next fiscal year.

Many 2016 hopefuls kind of say the U.S. should accept more refugees but the GOP's Jeb Bush, Marco Rubio and Carly Fiorina are worried about terrorists entering the country.

See photos related to foreign policy:

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US presidential race issues: Foreign policy
INDIANAPOLIS, IN - OCTOBER 8: Ed and Paula Kassig attend a vigil for their son, aid worker Peter Kassig at Butler University October 8, 2014 in Indianapolis, Indiana. Kassig has been held by ISIS since being captured in Syria in October of 2013. (Photo by Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - FEBRUARY 25: New York Police Commissioner Bill Bratton speaks at a news conference where he discussed the arrest of three Brooklyn men who allegedly plotted to travel to Syria to join ISIS on February 25, 2015 in New York City. The men, two Uzbekistan citizens and a 19-year-old Kazakhstan citizen,all lived in Brooklyn and were corresponding with the terrorist group over social media. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
Senator Marco Rubio shakes hands as he leaves the Foreign Policy Initiative breakfast August 14, 2015 in New York. Rubio spoke about national security and foreign policy challenges facing the United States. AFP PHOTO/DON EMMERT (Photo credit should read DON EMMERT/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON D.C., Sept. 9, 2015-- U.S. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during 'Stop the Iran Deal' rally at West Lawn of the Capitol in Washington D.C., capital of the United States, Sept. 9, 2015. U.S. Republican presidential candidates Donald Trump and Ted Cruz called on lawmakers to boycott the Iran nuclear deal Wednesday, warning of dire consequences if the agreement is implemented. (Xinhua/Bao Dandan via Getty Images)
Pat Webb, 62, of Miami, Florida, holds a sign opposing the Iran nuclear deal during a Tea Party Patriots rally against the Iran nuclear deal on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Wednesday, Sept. 9, 2015. A revolt among U.S. House Republicans delayed action on the Iran nuclear deal today as some members insisted they aren't bound by a Sept. 17 deadline in their efforts to kill the agreement. Photographer: Pete Marovich/Bloomberg via Getty Images
An attendee places his hands over his heart during the Pledge of Allegiance at a Tea Party Patriots rally against the Iran nuclear deal on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Wednesday, Sept. 9, 2015. A revolt among U.S. House Republicans delayed action on the Iran nuclear deal today as some members insisted they aren't bound by a Sept. 17 deadline in their efforts to kill the agreement. Photographer: Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images
US Republican presidential candidate Ted Cruz speaks at a rally organized by the Tea Party Patriots against the Iran nuclear deal in front of the Capitol in Washington, DC, on September 9, 2015. AFP PHOTO/NICHOLAS KAMM (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, USA - SEPTEMBER 8: Activist pose for a picture on the steps of the US Capitol after a press conference held by activists that support President Obama's nuclear agreement with Iran in Washington, USA on September 8, 2015. (Photo by Samuel Corum/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
Anti-war protesters hold signs before former US Vice President Dick Cheney speaks against the Iranian nuclear deal at the American Enterprise Institute (AEI) in Washington, DC, on September 8, 2015. AFP PHOTO/NICHOLAS KAMM (Photo credit should read NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images)
DAVIE, FL - SEPTEMBER 03: General view of protests outside the David Posnack Jewish Community Center where U.S. Vice President Joe Biden meeting with Jewish community leaders at the David Posnack Jewish Community Center to discuss the nuclear deal reached with Iran on September 3, 2015 in Davie, Florida. (Photo by Johnny Louis/FilmMagic)
DAVIE, FL - SEPTEMBER 03: Kayla Marks protests against the nuclear deal reached with Iran before U.S. Vice President Joe Biden meets with Jewish community leaders at the David Posnack Jewish Community Center to discuss the deal on September 3, 2015 in Davie, Florida. President Barack Obama on Wednesday secured enough votes to put the agreement in place. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
BALTIMORE, MD - AUGUST 26: MoveOn members and anti-war activists demonstrate outside the office of Sen. Ben Cardin (D-Md.), urging Cardin to support the deal to prevent Iran from acquiring a nuclear weapon on August 26, 2015 in Baltimore, Maryland. (Photo by Larry French/Getty Images for MoveOn.org)
Jeb Bush, former governor of Florida and 2016 Republican presidential candidate, speaks during an event at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library in Simi Valley, California, U.S., on Tuesday, Aug. 11, 2015. Bush, elected Florida's forty-third governor in 1998, discussed foreign policy. Photographer: Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg via Getty Images
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On the left, all candidates believe the U.S. should step up their game. Especially Martin O'Malley, who even started a petition to accept 65,000 refugees by 2017.

And then there's the Iran deal. Earlier this year, five world powers known as the P5 nations, plus Germany, made a deal with Iran that they would end years of economic sanctions against Tehran if the country agreed not to develop nuclear weapons. For now, the deal has made it through Congress, but that hasn't stopped the right from railing against it.


Although every GOP presidential hopeful has criticized the deal, Donald Trump and Jeb Bush said that, if elected, they would not tear it up immediately.

As for the left - every candidate stands with the president in supporting the Iran deal.
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