Pat Tillman's wife issued a strong statement decrying Trump's immigration executive order

Donald Trump's executive order to ban immigrants from seven predominantly Muslim countries has been met with wide-ranging acrimony and criticism, including from many figures in the sports world.

One such statement against the executive order came, on Saturday, from Marie Tillman, the widow of Pat Tillman.

Tillman played in the NFL from 1998-2001, and after the September 11 terrorist attacks decided to quit football and enlist in the military. As an Army Ranger, he served in Iraq and Afghanistan and was killed in 2004 in Afghanistan.

Learn more about Pat Tillman's life:

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Former NFL star and U.S. Soldier Pat Tillman is pictured in this June 2003 file photograph. The Pentagon's inspector general will blame nine U.S. Army officers, including up to four generals, for missteps after the April 2004 death in Afghanistan by friendly fire of Tillman, the "CBS Evening News" reported on March 23, 2007. It said the Pentagon would release its findings on Monday, showing the officers failed to follow regulations and used poor judgment in keeping the truth of the cause of Tillman's death from his family for more than a month. REUTERS/Photography Plus C/O Stealth Media Solutions/Handout (UNITED STATES). EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS.
TEMPE, AZ - NOVEMBER 5: Arizona Cardinals' Rob Fredrickson (59)and Pat Tillman (40) celebrate while Washington Redskins Albert Connell sits on the ground 05 November, 2000, as the game ends. Connell failed to catch a fourth down Jeff Blake pass. The Cardinals defeated the Redskins 16-15 at Sun Devil Stadium in Tempe, Arizona. (Photo credit should read IRWIN R. DAUGHERTY/AFP/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - OCTOBER 03: Football: Arizona Cardinals Pat Tillman (40) in action, making tackle vs Dallas Cowboys Deion Sanders (21), Irving, TX 10/3/1999 (Photo by Damian Strohmeyer/Sports Illustrated/Getty Images) (SetNumber: X58821 TK2 R6 F18)
CINCINNATI, OH - DECEMBER 3: Pat Tillman #40 of the Arizona Cardinals lines up against the Cincinnati Bengals at Paul Brown Stadium on December 3, 2000 in Cincinnati, Ohio. The Bengals defeated the Cardinals 24-13. (Photo by Joe Robbins/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - APRIL 24: Daily News front page dated April 24, 2004, Headline: They called him a football hero, but Pat Tillman turned down millions to fight for something he believed in. On the battlefield of Afghanistan he died a..., TRUE HERO (Photo by NY Daily News Archive via Getty Images)
NEW YORK CITY - APRIL 24: A memorial for former NFL defensive back Pat Tillman during the 2004 NFL Draft on April 24, 2004 at Madison Square Garden in New York City. The 27-year-old former Arizona Cardinals football player was killed in direct action during a firefight in eastern Afghanistan two days before the draft. Tillman left the NFL shortly after the September 11th attacks and enrolled in the Army to become an Army Ranger. (Photo by Chris Trotman/Getty Images)
SAN JOSE, CA - MAY 3: Darius Rucker of Hootie and the Blowfish sings at a memorial service for Pat Tillman in the Municipal Rose Garden May 3, 2004 in San Jose, California. Pat Tillman, former professional football player for the Arizona Cardinals, gave up his NFL career to enlist as an Army Ranger and was killed on patrol in Afghanistan on April 22, 2004. (Photo by Gene Lower-Pool/Getty Images)
SAN JOSE, CA - MAY 3: Memorial cards are passed out at a service held by the family of Cpl. Pat Tillman for Tillman, who was killed in action in Afghanistan April 22, 2004, at the San Jose Municipal Rose Garden May 3, 2004 in San Jose, California. (Photo by David Paul Morris/Getty Images)
NFL commissioner Paul Tagliabue speaks in front of a poster of former Arizona Cardinals Pat Tillman during a news conference before the memorial service for Tillman in San Jose, California, May 3, 2004. Tillman, who gave up his NFL career to enlist in the U.S. Army as a Ranger, was killed in battle in Afghanistan on April 22. REUTERS/Gene Lower/POOL PS/GAC
California first lady Maria Shriver speaks at a memorial service for former Arizona Cardinal Pat Tillman in San Jose, California, May 3, 2004. Tillman, who gave up his NFL career to enlist in the U.S. Army as a Ranger, was killed in Afghanistan on April 22. REUTERS/Gene Lower/POOL PS/GAC
A still image taken off a live feed of the Pentagon news conference shows a file photo of U.S. Army Ranger Cpl Pat Tillman (L), and U.S. Defense Department Acting Inspector General Thomas Gimble speaking about the circumstances surrounding Tillman's death, inside the press briefing room of the Pentagon March 26, 2007. A Pentagon watchdog on Monday found fault with nine officers for investigations and incorrect accounts of the death of U.S. Army Ranger and former professional football star Tillman in Afghanistan. REUTERS/Jason Reed (UNITED STATES)
Military personnel bow their heads in moment of silence during ceremony to open Pat Tillman United Service Organizations centre at Bagram Air Base near Kabul. Military personnel bow their heads in a moment of silence during a ceremony to open the Pat Tillman United Service Organizations (USO) centre at Bagram Air Base near Kabul, Afghanistan, April 3, 2005. The National Football League donated $250,000 to the USO in 2004, named in honour of Pat Tillman, a former player with the Arizona Cardinals and a U.S. Army Ranger who was killed in Afghanistan in 2004. REUTERS/USO photo/Mike Theiler/Handout
Marie Tillman, wife of former football star Pat Tillman, listens to Pat Tillman's brother Kevin Tillman (L), speak about Pat Tillman's death in battle, at a hearing titled "Misleading information from the battlefield" held by the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington April 24, 2007. Pat Tillman was killed by friendly fire in Afghanistan in 2004. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque (UNITED STATES)
The Pat Tillman memorial statue is unveiled before the Arizona Cardinals vs Dallas Cowboys game at University of Phoenix Stadium in Glendale, Arizona on November 12, 2006. (Photo by Gene Lower/Getty Images)
SAN JOSE, CA - MAY 3: Zack Walz, who was Arizona Cardinals' Pat Tillman's roommate and teammate, speaks to the crowd during a memorial service for Cpl Pat Tillman on May 3, 2004 at the San Jose Municipal Rose Garden in San Jose, California. Tillman turned down a lucrative NFL contract to serve as a US Army Ranger and was killed in action in Afghanistan April 22, 2004. Walz also played against Tillman in San Jose during High School. (Photo by David Paul Morris/Getty Images)
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On Facebook, his wife wrote that Trump's executive order is not representative of the country her husband dreamed of, what he served for, or what he died for.

Here's her full statement, from Facebook:

"In 2002 my husband enlisted in the US Army, he stood up to serve because he believed in the principles on which our country was founded and, recognizing it wasn't perfect, was passionate about what it could be. Today I am deeply saddened by the news of the executive order banning immigration. This is not the country he dreamed of, not what he served for and not what he died for. Since his death I have embarked on the most meaningful work of my life, supporting the men and women who, like Pat, fight for what this country can be. As I read posts from the community of #Tillman Scholars on my Facebook feed I am encouraged; they are exactly as I knew they would be, poised and ready to fight. I am proud of them and proud to stand with them, we've got this."

Marie Tillman is hardly the only person to decry Trump's executive order, but considering what she has been through, and all her her husband sacrificed, it is certainly one of the most powerful.

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Protesters and lawyers welcome international travelers in airports amid immigration ban
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Protesters and lawyers welcome international travelers in airports amid immigration ban
A young girl dances with an American flag in baggage claim while women pray behind her during a protest against the travel ban imposed by U.S. President Donald Trump's executive order, at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport in Dallas, Texas, U.S. January 29, 2017. REUTERS/Laura Buckman
People chant and hold signs as they protest against the travel ban imposed by U.S. President Donald Trump's executive order, at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport International Arrivals gate in Dallas, Texas, U.S. January 29, 2017. REUTERS/Laura Buckman
An international traveler smiles as she walks past the protest against the travel ban imposed by U.S. President Donald Trump's executive order, at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport in Dallas, Texas, U.S. January 29, 2017. REUTERS/Laura Buckman
Lawyers and legal assistants network and use social media in the baggage claim area, amid supplies of pizza, water and other food, at Dulles International Airport, aiding passengers who have arrived and encounter problems because of Donald Trump's travel ban to the United States, in Chantilly, Virginia, in suburban Washington, U.S., January 29, 2017. REUTERS/Mike Theiler
Volunteer lawyers work in a dining area of Terminal 4 to assist travelers detained as part of Donald Trump's travel ban in Terminal 4 at John F. Kennedy International Airport in Queens, New York, U.S., January 29, 2017. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly
Lawyer Darryl Hairston works with a team of volunteer lawyers to arrange habeus corpus petitions for travelers detained as part of Donald Trump's travel ban in Terminal 4 at John F. Kennedy International Airport in Queens, New York, U.S., January 29, 2017. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly
Demonstrators yell slogans during anti-Donald Trump travel ban protests outside Hatfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport in Atlanta, Georgia U.S., January 29, 2017. REUTERS/Chris Aluka Berry
Demonstrators sit inside LAX international terminal and yell slogans during protest against the travel ban imposed by U.S. President Donald Trump's executive order, at Los Angeles International Airport in Los Angeles, California, U.S., January 29, 2017. REUTERS/Ted Soqui
Demonstrators yell slogans during anti-Donald Trump travel ban protests outside Philadelphia International Airport in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S., January 29, 2017. REUTERS/Charles Mostoller
Women walk by a team of volunteer lawyers in their makeshift office working to assist travelers detained as part of Donald Trump's travel ban in Terminal 4 at John F. Kennedy International Airport in Queens, New York, U.S., January 29, 2017. REUTERS/Andrew Kelly
Demonstrators march and block traffic during anti-Donald Trump travel ban protests outside Philadelphia International Airport in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S., January 29, 2017. REUTERS/Charles Mostoller
An international traveler smiles as she walks past the protest against the travel ban imposed by U.S. President Donald Trump's executive order, at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport in Dallas, Texas, U.S. January 29, 2017. REUTERS/Laura Buckman
LOS ANGELES, CA - JANUARY 29: Protesters hold signs during a demonstration against the immigration ban that was imposed by U.S. President Donald Trump at Los Angeles International Airport on January 29, 2017 in Los Angeles, California. Thousands of protesters gathered outside of the Tom Bradley International Terminal at Los Angeles International Airport to denounce the travel ban imposed by President Trump. Protests are taking place at airports across the country. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
Demonstrators hold signs outside Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) protesting against U.S. President Donald Trump's executive order blocking visitors from seven predominantly Muslim nations in Los Angeles, California, U.S., on Sunday, Jan. 29, 2017. Court decisions temporarily blocked the U.S. administration from enforcing parts of Trump's order after a day in which students, refugees and dual citizens were stuck overseas or detained and some businesses warned employees from those countries not to risk leaving the United States. Photographer: Dania Maxwell/Bloomberg via Getty Images
LOS ANGELES, CA - JANUARY 29: Protesters march during a demonstration against the immigration ban that was imposed by U.S. President Donald Trump at Los Angeles International Airport on January 29, 2017 in Los Angeles, California. Thousands of protesters gathered outside of the Tom Bradley International Terminal at Los Angeles International Airport to denounce the travel ban imposed by President Trump. Protests are taking place at airports across the country. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, UNITED STATES - JANUARY 29: Demonstrators against President Donald Trump's Muslim Ban come together at 2nd Day of protests at Los Angeles International Airport, in Los Angeles, California, United States on January 29, 2017. Lots of muslim people still under custody of US Custom and Border Patrol after Trumps's executive order. (Photo by Aydin Palabiyikoglu/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
Protesters gather at the international arrivals area of the Washington Dulles International Airport on January 29, 2017, in Sterling, Virginia. US President Donald Trump issued an executive order yesterday barring citizens of seven Muslim-majority countries from entering the United States for the next 90 days and suspends the admission of all refugees for 120 days. / AFP / Thomas WATKINS (Photo credit should read THOMAS WATKINS/AFP/Getty Images)
Protestors crowd the sidewalks at HartsfieldJackson Atlanta International Airport to denounce US President Donald Trump's executive order, which restricts refugees and travelers from seven Muslim-majority countries in Atlanta, Georgia on January 29, 2017 / AFP / TAMI CHAPPELL (Photo credit should read TAMI CHAPPELL/AFP/Getty Images)
More than 600 people holding protests signs gathered on Sunday, Jan. 29, 2017 at the Boise Airport to voice opposition to President Donald Trump's recent refugee order. The protest started with a FaceBook page asking people in the area to join a nationwide movement to gather at airports. (Darin Oswald/Idaho Statesman/TNS via Getty Images)
PHILADELPHIA, PA - JANUARY 29: Demonstrators at Philadelphia International Airport protest against the executive order that President Donald Trump signed clamping down on refugee admissions and temporarily restricting travelers from seven predominantly Muslim countries on January 29, 2017 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Demonstrators gathered at airports across the country in protest of the order. (Photo by Jessica Kourkounis/Getty Images)
PHILADELPHIA, PA - JANUARY 29: A police officer stands guard as demonstrators at Philadelphia International Airport protest against the executive order that President Donald Trump signed clamping down on refugee admissions and temporarily restricting travelers from seven predominantly Muslim countries on January 29, 2017 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Demonstrators gathered at airports across the country in protest of the order. (Photo by Jessica Kourkounis/Getty Images)
Thousands turn out for a January 29th, 2017 Immigration Ban Protest at Philadelphia International Airport, in Philadelphia Pennsylvania. (Photo by Bastiaan Slabbers/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
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