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Steelers QB Ben Roethlisberger underwent surgery on torn meniscus

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Ben Roethlisberger has been a stalwart at quarterback for the Pittsburgh Steelers, leading them to a handful of playoff appearances and two Super Bowl victories.

Toughness has also been a staple of his game for years as he lets defenses batter and bruise him. It often results in injuries, though, as he has has missed at least one game from 2009-12 and started 11 games in 2015.

Well, the injury bug has hit Roethlisberger again.

Roethlisberger suffered a torn meniscus in his left knee during Sunday's loss to the Miami Dolphins and underwent surgery on Monday. There isn't a known timetable for his return.

SEE MORE: Who could step in for Big Ben?

Roethlisberger was enjoying a great season, putting up 1,496 passing yards and 15 touchdowns.

32 PHOTOS
Touring all 31 NFL stadiums (Architectural Digest)
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Touring all 31 NFL stadiums (Architectural Digest)

In Charlotte, North Carolina, the Carolina Panthers play before 75,400 fans at Bank of America Stadium. Completed in 1996, the venue was designed by Populous.

(Photo via Getty)

Gillette Stadium has been the home of the New England Patriots since 2002. Situated just outside Boston, in Foxborough, Massachusetts, the Populous-designed venue can seat 68,750 fans.

(Photo via Getty)

Ford Field is where the Detroit Lions have played since 2002. Designed by the locally based firm Rossetti Architects, the hometown venue has a capacity of 65,000.

(Photo via Getty)

The Dallas Cowboys play before 80,000 in the HKS-designed AT&T Stadium. Built in 2009, the venue is located in Arlington, Texas.

(Photo via Getty)

When the Rams return to Los Angeles this year (after a ten-year run in St. Louis), they’ll take residence in the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum. Completed in 1923 by architects John and Donald Parkinson, the venue is also home to USC’s college football team. The two will only have to share the stadium until 2019, when the Rams move into their soon-to-be-built City of Champions Stadium, designed by the Dallas-based firm HKS. Estimated at $2.6 billion, the new venue would be the world’s most expensive sports complex.

(Photo via Getty)

In 1972, the Kansas City Chiefs’ new home was opened in Kansas City, Missouri. Designed by the locally based firm Kivett and Myers and renovated in 2007–10 by Populous, Arrowhead Stadium holds up to 76,400 fans.

(Photo via Getty)

Since 2002, the Seattle Seahawks have played in the 69,000-capacity CenturyLink Field. The Seattle stadium was designed by Minnesota-based firm Ellerbe Becket.

(Photo via Getty)

Located in Landover, Maryland, FedEx Field is home to the Washington Redskins. The 82,000-seat stadium was designed by the New York-based firm Populous in 1997.

(Photo via Getty)

The Mercedes-Benz Superdome in New Orleans is the home field of the Saints. Built in 1975, the 73,200-capacity stadium was designed by the locally based firm Curtis and Davis Architects.

(Photo via Getty)

Ralph Wilson Stadium is where the Buffalo Bills pack in 71,870 screaming fans. Located in Orchard Park, New York, the venue was designed by HNTB in 1973 and renovated by Populous in 2013.

(Photo via Getty)

Back in 1995, Populous completed its design of Jacksonville, Florida’s EverBank Field, home to the Jaguars. The venue can accommodate 67,245 ardent supporters.

(Photo via Getty)

Since 1992, the Atlanta Falcons have called the Georgia Dome their home. Built by the Philadelphia-based firm Heery International, the structure can seat 71,250 fans. Plans for the Falcons’ new home, the HOK-designed Mercedes-Benz Stadium, are in the works, with construction expected to be completed by 2017.

(Photo via Getty)

The Baltimore Ravens play before 71,000 exuberant fans at M&T Bank Stadium in their home city. The structure was completed in 1998 by Populous.

(Photo via Getty)

Some 70,560 spectators pack into Qualcomm Stadium to cheer on their beloved San Diego Chargers. Built in 1967, the venue was designed by the San Diego–based firm Frank L. Hope and Associates.

(Photo via Getty)

Lincoln Financial Field has been the Philadelphia Eagles’ home field since 2003. Located in the team’s home city, the 69,600-capacity stadium was designed by the New York-based firm NBBJ.

(Photo via Getty)

Designed by Populous in 1999, Nissan Stadium in Nashville, Tennessee, can pack in some 69,150 fans to cheer on the Tennessee Titans.

(Photo via Getty)

The 68,400 faithful that pack Heinz Field each game day come to support the Pittsburgh Steelers. Built in 2001 by Populous, the venue is located in the team’s home city.

(Photo via Getty)

In Green Bay, Wisconsin, some 81,435 fans can pack into Lambeau Field to cheer on their beloved Packers. The Green Bay–based firm Somerville built the iconic venue in 1957.

(Photo via Getty)

Completed in 2014, Levi’s Stadium is the new home of the San Francisco 49ers. Located in Santa Clara, California, the 68,500-capacity venue was designed by HNTB.

(Photo via Getty)

Sports Authority Field at Mile High is home to the Denver Broncos. Located in the team’s home city, the venue was completed in 2001 by the New York–based firm HNTB and can accommodate 76,125 spectators.

(Photo via Getty)

The Cleveland Browns have played in FirstEnergy Stadium since 1999. Designed by Populous, their hometown stadium can seat 67,430 fans each game.

(Photo via Getty)

Lucas Oil Stadium has been the home field of the Indianapolis Colts since 2008. Located in downtown Indianapolis, the HKS-designed venue was completed in 2008.

(Photo via Getty)

The Houston Texans play before 71,500 fans at NRG Stadium in their home city. The venue was completed in 2002 by Populous.

(Photo via Getty)

Raymond James Stadium has been home to the Tampa Bay Buccaneers since 1998. Some 65,890 fans can pack into the Tampa, Florida, venue, another Populous project.

(Photo via Getty)

The recently completed U.S. Bank Stadium is the new home of the Minnesota Vikings. The HKS-designed structure is located in the heart of downtown Minneapolis and can seat 66,200 fans.

(Photo via Getty)

Back in 2000, Paul Brown Stadium became the new home of the Cincinnati Bengals. Created by NBBJ, the venue can hold up to 65,515 spectators.

(Photo via Getty)

Although it’s called New Miami Stadium, the Dolphins’ homefield was actually completed in 1987, by Populous. The stadium can currently hold 65,325 people.

(Photo via Getty)

MetLife Stadium is the only NFL venue that is home to two teams. Both the New York Giants and the New York Jets play in the 82,500-seat East Rutherford, New Jersey, stadium, which was designed by the Missouri–based 360 Architecture and completed in 2010.

(Photo via Getty)

The Arizona Cardinals have been playing at the University of Phoenix Stadium, in Glendale, since 2006. Created by New York–based Eisenman Architects, the structure has seating for 63,400 fans.

(Photo via Getty)

Built in 1966, the Oakland Alameda Coliseum in California—home to the Oakland Raiders—is among the oldest operating NFL stadiums in the country. Designed by the Chicago-based firm SOM, the team’s hometown venue has a capacity for 56,055 fans.

(Photo via Getty)

The iconic Soldier Field is home to the Chicago Bears. Situated along Lake Michigan, the venue was completed in 1924 by Holabird and Roche. In 2003 the stadium underwent a renovation by Wood + Zapata, which enhanced crowd capacity to 61,500 and made it the first-ever LEED-certified NFL stadium.

(Photo via Getty)

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Landry Jones would be next in line to start at quarterback. The Oklahoma alumnus receiver starting time in 2015 when Big Ben went down, but had a 58.3-percent completion percentage.

SEE MORE: Texans coach and Brock Osweiler had heated exchange

This includes 513 yards, three touchdowns, and four interceptions. So, he probably won't be a dynamic presence for the Steelers, leaving the running game likely being used more. Le'Veon Bell and DeAngelo Williams would be set for more carries.

Now, the question becomes when the Steelers will get Roethlisberger back. Let's face it: if they want to see the postseason, the Pro Bowler will be needed.

33 PHOTOS
The highest-paid player on all 32 NFL teams 2016
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The highest-paid player on all 32 NFL teams 2016

32. Joe Haden, Cleveland Browns — $10,200,000

Position: Cornerback

2016 earnings breakdown: $10.1 million salary and $100,000 workout bonus.

One thing to know: The Browns have not had a player making more than $11 million in a season since 2013.

(Photo by Nick Cammett/Diamond Images/Getty Images)

31. Jack Conklin, Tennessee Titans — $10,211,933

Position: Right tackle

2016 earnings breakdown: $450,000 salary and a $9.8 million signing bonus.

One thing to know: Conklin, a rookie, is the only player on the roster making more than $7.5 million this season. 

(Photo by Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images)

30. Andy Dalton, Cincinnati Bengals — $10,700,000

Position: Quarterback

2016 earnings breakdown: $10.5 million salary and a $200,000 workout bonus.

One thing to know: Dalton will not make more than $13.7 million in a season until 2019 when his earnings will jump to $16.0 million.

(Photo by Joe Robbins/Getty Images)

29. Gerald McCoy, Tampa Bay Buccaneers — $12,500,000

Position: Defensive tackle

2016 earnings breakdown: $6.0 million salary and $6.5 million roster bonus.

One thing to know: The last time McCoy was not the highest-paid player on the Bucs was 2013 when the honor went to Darelle Revis.

(Photo by Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images)

28. Richard Sherman, Seattle Seahawks — $12,569,000

Position: Cornerback

2016 earnings breakdown: $12.6 million salary

One thing to know: Russell Wilson is a close second at $12.3 million.

(Photo by Jeff Gross/Getty Images)

27. Kelechi Osemele, Oakland Raiders — $13,200,000

Position: Guard

2016 earnings breakdown: $6.7 million salary and $6.5 million in bonuses.

One thing to know: Osemele signed a 5-year, $58.5 million contract with the Raiders as a free agent this past offseason. His earnings will drop next season to $6.7 million.

(Photo by Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images)

26. Ndamukong Suh, Miami Dolphins — $13,500,000

Position: Defensive tackle

2016 earnings breakdown: $3.5 million salary, $10.0 million signing.

One thing to know: Suh takes up just $12.6 million of the team's salary cap space this season. However, that number jumps to $19.1 million next season and $26.1 million the year after. It is more likely that he will restructure his contract before then.

(Photo by Ron Elkman/Sports Imagery/ Getty Images)

25. Colin Kaepernick, San Francisco 49ers — $14,300,000

Position: Quarterback

2016 earnings breakdown: $11.9 million salary and $2.4 million in bonuses.

One thing to know: Kaepernick has not started a game since Week 8 of the 2015 season.

(Photo by Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images)

24. Harrison Smith, Minnesota Vikings — $15,278,000

Position: Free safety

2016 earnings breakdown: $5.3 million salary and $10.0 million signing bonus.

One thing to know: Adrian Peterson, who will miss most of the season with a knee injury is second on the list at $12.0 million.

(Photo by Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images)

23. Matt Ryan, Atlanta Falcons — $15,750,000

Position: Quarterback

2016 earnings breakdown: $15.75 million salary

One thing to know: Ryan is in the third year of his five-year, $104 million extension. His $23.8 million salary cap figure will remain the same next year, before falling to $21.7 million in the final year of the deal.

(Photo by Jonathan Bachman/Getty Images)

22. Jay Cutler, Chicago Bears — $16,000,000

Position: Quarterback

2016 earnings breakdown: $16.0 million salary

One thing to know: At one point, Cutler's 7-year, $126.7 million contract was named the worst quarterback contract in the NFL.

(Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images)

21. David Bakhtiari, Green Bay Packers — $16,757,117

Position: Left tackle

2016 earnings breakdown: $757,117 salary, $15.0 million signing bonus, and $1.0 million roster bonus.

One thing to know: Aaron Rodgers, at $12.6 million, is the only other player on the roster making at least $10 million this season.

(Photo by Mike Zarrilli/Getty Images)

20. Ezekiel Elliott, Dallas Cowboys — $16,800,066

Position: Running Back

2016 earnings breakdown: $450,000 salary, $16.4 million signing bonus 

One thing to know: Only seven running backs have larger contracts than the 4-year, $25.0 million rookie contract Elliot signed after being drafted fourth overall in this year's draft.

(Photo by Tom Pennington/Getty Images)

19. Matthew Stafford, Detroit Lions — $17,000,000

Position: Quarterback

2016 earnings breakdown: $17.0 million salary

One thing to know: Stafford has thrown 22 touchdowns and just 2 interceptions under new offensive coordinator Jim Bob Cooter.

(Photo by Stacy Revere/Getty Images)

18. Malik Jackson, Jacksonville Jaguars — $18,000,000

Position: Defensive Tackle

2016 earnings breakdown: $8.0 million salary, $10.0 million signing bonus

One thing to know: Jackson just sneaks into the list this year with a $10.0 million signing bonus. His total earnings in Year 2 of his 6-year, $85.5 million contract will fall to $13.5 million.

(Photo by Sean M. Haffey/Getty Images)

17. David DeCastro, Pittsburgh Steelers — $18,100,000

Position: Guard

2016 earnings breakdown: $2.1 million salary, $16.0 million bonus

One thing to know: DeCastro was originally scheduled to make $8.1 million this season, the final year of his rookie contract. Instead he signed a 5-year, $50 million contract extension, just three months after responding to a question about his future by saying, "I’m making a lot of money this year. What am I worried about?"

(Photo by George Gojkovich/Getty Images)

16. Jared Goff, Los Angeles Rams — $18,968,308

Position: Quarterback

2016 earnings breakdown: $450,000 salary, $18.5 million signing bonus

One thing to know: The gave up six draft picks for the right to draft Goff, including their first-round pick next season. Based on how the Rams played in Week 1, that could be a top-3 pick

(Photo by Don Juan Moore/Getty Images)

15. Cordy Glenn, Buffalo Bills — $19,000,000

Position: Left Tackle

2016 earnings breakdown: $3.0 million salary, $16.0 million bonus

One thing to know: Glenn makes the list this year thanks to his new $60.0 million contract and $16.0 million signing bonus. His total earnings next year will fall to $11.0 million.

(Photo by Joe Robbins/Getty Images)

14. Kirk Cousins, Washington Redskins — $19,953,000

Position: Quarterback

2016 earnings breakdown: $19.95 million salary

One thing to know: Cousins received the franchise tag from the Redskins, giving him a 1-year, $19.95 million contract with no bonuses. That base salary is the largest in the NFL this season.  If he receives the franchise tag again next year, his salary is expected to jump to something in the neighborhood of $24.0 million.

(Photo by Toni L. Sandys/The Washington Post via Getty Images)

13. Cam Newton, Carolina Panthers — $20,000,000

Position: Quarterback

2016 earnings breakdown: $13.0 million salary, $7.0 million signing bonus

One thing to know: Newton's $103.8 million contract and $60 million guaranteed both rank sixth among quarterbacks. 

(Photo by Grant Halverson/Getty Images)

12. Carson Palmer, Arizona Cardinals — $20,250,000

Position: Quarterback

2016 earnings breakdown: $7.2 million salary, $6.8 million signing bonus, $6.4 million roster bonus

One thing to know: Palmer's $158.4 million in career earnings ranks fifth among active players.

(Photo by Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images)

11. Brock Osweiler, Houston Texans — $21,000,000

Position: Quarterback

2016 earnings breakdown: $4.0 million salary, $12.0 million signing bonus, $5.0 million roster bonus

One thing to know: Osweiler had started just seven games in his four-year career before signing a 4-year, $72.0 million contract as a free agent with the Houston Texans.

(Photo by Adam Glanzman/Getty Images)

9t. Philip Rivers, San Diego Chargers — $22,000,000

Position: Quarterback

2016 earnings breakdown: $10.5 million salary, $5.5 million signing bonus, and $6.0 million in other bonuses.

One thing to know: Rivers has already made $173.9 million in his career and still has $45.0 million left on his 4-year, $83.3 million contract.

(Photo by Stacy Revere/Getty Images)

9t. Muhammad Wilkerson, New York Jets — $22,000,000

Position: Defensive End

2016 earnings breakdown: $7.0 million salary, $15.0 million bonus

One thing to know: Wilkerson's $86.0 million contract is second only to J.J. Watt among defensive ends. 

(Photo by Tom Szczerbowski/Getty Images)

8. Justin Houston, Kansas City Chiefs — $23,500,000

Position: Outside Linebacker

2016 earnings breakdown: $7.4 million salary, $8.5 million signing bonus. and $7.6 million in other bonuses.

One thing to know: In a perfect example of how quickly large contracts change, Houston signed a 6-year, $101.0 million contract prior to the 2015 season and then had that deal restructured prior to the 2016 season. 

(Photo by Justin Edmonds/Getty Images)

7. Von Miller, Denver Broncos — $25,100,000

Position: Outside Linebacker

2016 earnings breakdown: $2.0 million salary, $17.0 million signing bonus, and $6.1 million other bonuses.

One thing to know: Miller signed a 6-year, $114.5 million contract just months after being named the Super Bowl MVP. The total value surpasses Ndamukong Suh's deal as the largest among defensive players.

(Photo by Joe Amon/The Denver Post via Getty Images)

6. Fletcher Cox, Philadelphia Eagles — $27,299,000

Position: Defensive Tackle

2016 earnings breakdown: $1.3 million salary, $26.0 million signing bonus

One thing to know: Cox makes this list thanks to his huge $26.0 million signing bonus. Next year, his earnings drop to $4.2 million, before going back up to $12.7 million in 2018. With his contract counting $22.0 million against the cap in 2019, look for Cox to rework his contract in the next two years.

(Photo by Mitchell Leff/Getty Images)

5. Tom Brady, New England Patriots — $28,764,705

Position: Quarterback

2016 earnings breakdown: $764,705 salary, $28.0 million signing bonus

One thing to know: Brady has said that he wants to play until he is 45 (through the 2022 season) and that he wants to play 10 more seasons (through the 2025 season).

(Photo by Barry Chin/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)

3t. Joe Flacco, Baltimore Ravens — $29,000,000

Position: Quarterback

2016 earnings breakdown: $4.0 million salary, $25.0 million signing bonus

One thing to know: Flacco restructured his last contract, basically turning his 2013 contract into a nine-year, $187 million deal with six years remaining.

(Photo by Nick Cammett/Diamond Images/Getty Images)

3t. Olivier Vernon, New York Giants — $29,000,000

Position: Defensive End

2016 earnings breakdown: $1.8 million salary, $20.0 million signing bonus, and 7.3 million in other bonuses.

One thing to know: Vernon's $20 million signing bonus was the second-largest among defensive players, behind only Fletcher Cox's $26.0 million signing bonus.

(Photo by Rich Barnes/Getty Images)

2. Andrew Luck, Indianapolis Colts — $30,000,000

Position: Quarterback

2016 earnings breakdown: $12.0 million salary, $18.0 million signing bonus

One thing to know: Andrew Luck's new 5-year contract is thelargest in NFL historyin terms of total value ($140.0 million) and guaranteed value ($89.0 million).

(Photo by Stacy Revere/Getty Images)

1. Drew Brees, New Orleans Saints — $31,250,000

Position: Quarterback

2016 earnings breakdown: $1.0 million salary, $30.0 million signing bonus, and $250,000 workout bonus.

One thing to know: Brees was in the last year of his contract and was set to take up an enormous $30 million in salary cap space. He recently extended his contract, lowering his salary-cap hit to $17.3 million, thanks to a $30 million signing bonus.

(Photo by Jonathan Bachman/Getty Images)
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