Warren keeps pummeling Bloomberg in Nevada. But is it too late for a comeback?

NORTH LAS VEGAS, Nev. — “Obliterated him.” “Eviscerated him.” “Wiped the floor with him.”

These were some of the (less graphic) ways that the supporters of Elizabeth Warren who swarmed her campaign’s North Las Vegas field office Thursday morning described what their candidate did to Michael Bloomberg during the previous night’s debate. And when Warren herself finally arrived and bounded to the front of the bare-bones room to address the crowd, she was eager to keep piling on the multibillionaire former New York mayor.

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Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., speaks during a rally Monday, Aug. 19, 2019, at Macalaster College during a campaign appearance in St. Paul, Minn. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)
Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., speaks during a rally Monday, Aug. 19, 2019 at Macalaster College during a campaign appearance in St. Paul, Minn. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)
Supporters wave signs before Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., speaks at a rally Monday, Aug. 19, 2019, at Macalaster College during a campaign appearance in St. Paul, Minn. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)
Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., speaks during a rally Monday, Aug. 19, 2019, at Macalaster College during a campaign appearance in St. Paul, Minn. (AP Photo/Jim Mone)
Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) comes out to a standing ovation, lays out her recently release immigration plan even as immigration protesters shouted her down at the Netroots Nation 2019 Presidential candidates forum in Philadelphia, PA on July 13, 2019. (Photo by Cory Clark/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
PETERBOROUGH, NH - JULY 8: U.S. Senator and presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren appears during her town hall event at the Peterborough Town House in Peterborough, NH on July 8, 2019. (Photo by Erin Clark for The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
PETERBOROUGH, NH - JULY 8: Jo-Ann Finn pins an Elizabeth Warren pin onto her shirt before attending a town hall event held by U.S. Senator and presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren at the Peterborough Town House in Peterborough, NH on July 8, 2019. (Photo by Erin Clark for The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
PETERBOROUGH, NH - JULY 8: U.S. Senator and presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren speaks during her town hall event at the Peterborough Town House in Peterborough, NH on July 8, 2019. (Photo by Erin Clark for The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
PETERBOROUGH, NH - JULY 8: U.S. Senator and presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren appears during her town hall event at the Peterborough Town House in Peterborough, NH on July 8, 2019. (Photo by Erin Clark for The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
PETERBOROUGH, NH - JULY 8: A supporter waves her fan during a town hall event held by U.S. Senator and presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren at the Peterborough Town House in Peterborough, NH on July 8, 2019. (Photo by Erin Clark for The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
PETERBOROUGH, NH - JULY 8: Attendees hold up signs during a town hall event held by U.S. Senator and presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren at the Peterborough Town House in Peterborough, NH on July 8, 2019. (Photo by Erin Clark for The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA - JULY 06: Senator Elizabeth Warren speaks at the 25th Essence Festival at Ernest N. Morial Convention Center on July 06, 2019 in New Orleans, Louisiana. (Photo by Josh Brasted/FilmMagic)
UNITED STATES - JULY 4: Supporters of presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., chant during the Boulder City Damboree Celebration 4th of July parade in Boulder City, NV on July 4, 2019. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
UNITED STATES - JULY 4: Supporters of presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., chant before the start of the start of the Boulder City Damboree Celebration 4th of July parade in Boulder City, NV on July 4, 2019. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
LAS VEGAS, NEVADA - JULY 02: Democratic presidential candidate U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) speaks during a community conversation at the East Las Vegas Community Center on July 2, 2019 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Polls taken after last week's first Democratic presidential debates show Warren gaining ground with voters. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NEVADA - JULY 02: Marilyn Beilstein (L) of Nevada poses for a photo with Democratic presidential candidate U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) after she spoke at a community conversation at the East Las Vegas Community Center on July 2, 2019 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Polls taken after last week's first Democratic presidential debates show Warren gaining ground with voters. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NEVADA - JULY 02: Democratic presidential candidate U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) speaks to members of the media after holding a community conversation at the East Las Vegas Community Center on July 2, 2019 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Polls taken after last week's first Democratic presidential debates show Warren gaining ground with voters. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NEVADA - JULY 02: Democratic presidential candidate U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) (C) poses with attendees after she spoke at a community conversation at the East Las Vegas Community Center on July 2, 2019 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Polls taken after last week's first Democratic presidential debates show Warren gaining ground with voters. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NEVADA - JULY 02: Democratic presidential candidate U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) hugs Clark County Democrats Chairwoman Donna West after Warren spoke at a community conversation at the East Las Vegas Community Center on July 2, 2019 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Polls taken after last week's first Democratic presidential debates show Warren gaining ground with voters. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
LAS VEGAS, NEVADA - JULY 02: Democratic presidential candidate U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) (L) talks with former Clark County Commissioner Chris Giunchigliani after Warren spoke at a community conversation at the East Las Vegas Community Center on July 2, 2019 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Polls taken after last week's first Democratic presidential debates show Warren gaining ground with voters. (Photo by Ethan Miller/Getty Images)
NBC NEWS ELECTION COVERAGE -- The First Democratic Debate -- Pictured: Elizabeth Warren at The Knight Concert Hall, Miami Florida on Wednesday, June 26,, 2019-- (Photo by: Gustavo Cabellero /NBC News/MSNBC/Telemundo/NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images)
Democratic presidential hopeful US Senator from Massachusetts Elizabeth Warren with NBC anchor Chris Matthews in the Spin Room after participating in the first Democratic primary debate of the 2020 presidential campaign season hosted by NBC News at the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts in Miami, Florida, June 26, 2019. (Photo by SAUL LOEB / AFP) (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) is seen on a television at a watch party for the first Democratic presidential primary debates for the 2020 elections in Miami on Wednesday, June 26, 2019. (John McCall/Sun Sentinel/TNS via Getty Images)
Democratic presidential hopeful US Senator from Massachusetts Elizabeth Warren speaks in the first Democratic primary debate of the 2020 presidential campaign season hosted by NBC News at the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts in Miami, Florida, June 26, 2019. (Photo by JIM WATSON / AFP) (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
MIAMI, FLORIDA - JUNE 26: Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) speaks during the first night of the Democratic presidential debate on June 26, 2019 in Miami, Florida. A field of 20 Democratic presidential candidates was split into two groups of 10 for the first debate of the 2020 election, taking place over two nights at Knight Concert Hall of the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts of Miami-Dade County, hosted by NBC News, MSNBC, and Telemundo. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
Democratic presidential hopeful US Senator from Massachusetts Elizabeth Warren is shown on a screen in the spin room during the first Democratic primary debate of the 2020 presidential campaign season hosted by NBC News at the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts in Miami, Florida, June 26, 2019. (Photo by SAUL LOEB / AFP) (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
MIAMI, FL - JUNE 26: Democratic presidential candidate and U.S. Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) is displayed on a monitor inside the spin room during the first Democratic presidential primary debate for the 2020 election at the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts, June 26, 2019 in Miami, Florida. A field of 20 Democratic presidential candidates was split into two groups of 10 for the first debate of the 2020 election, taking place over two nights at Knight Concert Hall of the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts of Miami-Dade County, hosted by NBC News, MSNBC, and Telemundo. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
MIAMI, FLORIDA - JUNE 26: Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) takes the stage during the first night of the Democratic presidential debate on June 26, 2019 in Miami, Florida. A field of 20 Democratic presidential candidates was split into two groups of 10 for the first debate of the 2020 election, taking place over two nights at Knight Concert Hall of the Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts of Miami-Dade County, hosted by NBC News, MSNBC, and Telemundo. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren is swarmed by the press while visiting at the Homestead Detention Center ahead of the first Democratic debate on June 26, 2019 in Homestead, Fla. (Daniel A Varela/Miami Herald/TNS via Getty Images)
Senator of Massachusetts and Democratic presidential hopeful Elizabeth Warren stands on a ladder with an unidentified girl, and gestures to migrant children in front of a detention center in Homestead, Florida on June 26, 2019. - Democrats are in Miami, Florida for their first debate -- and first inflection point -- of the 2020 election cycle, with ex-vice president Joe Biden taking the stage as frontrunner for the first time. Ten candidates including Senator Elizabeth Warren square off Wednesday, while Thursday's 10 feature Biden and three others polling in the top five. (Photo by RHONA WISE / AFP) (Photo credit should read RHONA WISE/AFP/Getty Images)
TOPSHOT - Senator of Massachusetts (D) and Democratic Presidential hopeful Elizabeth Warren gestures as she speaks during a town hall meeting at Florida International University in Miami, Florida on June 25, 2019. (Photo by RHONA WISE / AFP) (Photo credit should read RHONA WISE/AFP/Getty Images)
Senator Elizabeth Warren addresses the crowd at the We Decide: Planned Parenthood Action Fund 2020 Election Forum to Focus on Abortion and Reproductive Rights event in Columbia, SC on June, 22 2019. - Many of the Democratic candidates running for president are in Columbia to make appearances at the South Carolina Democratic Party Convention and the Planned Parenthood Election Forum on June 22. (Photo by Logan Cyrus / AFP) (Photo credit should read LOGAN CYRUS/AFP/Getty Images)
COLUMBIA, SC - JUNE 22: Democratic presidential candidate, Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) addresses the crowd at the 2019 South Carolina Democratic Party State Convention on June 22, 2019 in Columbia, South Carolina. Democratic presidential hopefuls are converging on South Carolina this weekend for a host of events where the candidates can directly address an important voting bloc in the Democratic primary. (Photo by Sean Rayford/Getty Images)
COLUMBIA, SC - JUNE 22: Supporters of Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) rally outside of the 2019 South Carolina Democratic Party State Convention on June 22, 2019 in Columbia, South Carolina. Democratic presidential hopefuls are converging on South Carolina this weekend for a host of events where the candidates can directly address an important voting bloc in the Democratic primary. (Photo by Sean Rayford/Getty Images)
MIAMI, FL - JUNE 21: Democratic U.S. presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) speaks at the Democratic presidential candidates NALEO Candidate Forum on June 21, 2019 in Miami, Florida. At left is moderator Arturo Vargas and at right is Vanessa Hauc. (Photo by Joe Skipper/Getty Images)
CHARLESTON, SC - JUNE 15: Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) waves to the audience during the Black Economic Alliance Forum on June 15, 2019 in Charleston, South Carolina. The Black Economic Alliance, is a nonpartisan group founded by Black executives and business leaders, and is hosting the forum in order to help Black voters understand candidate's platforms. (Photo by Sean Rayford/Getty Images)
WINDHAM, NH - JUNE 14: Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., speaks during a house party in Windham, New Hampshire on June 14, 2019. (Staff Photo By Christopher Evans/MediaNews Group/Boston Herald via Getty Images)
DYERSVILLE, IOWA - JUNE 10: Democratic presidential candidate Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) speaks with Raymond Defenbaugh during a visit to the Big River United Energy ethanol facility during a campaign stop on June 10, 2019 in Dyersville, Iowa. Yesterday Warren joined 19 other candidates seeking the Democratic presidential nomination at the Democratic Party’s Hall of Fame Dinner in Cedar Rapids. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
CEDAR RAPIDS, IOWA - JUNE 09: Democratic presidential candidate Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) speaks at the Iowa Democratic Party's Hall of Fame Dinner on June 9, 2019 in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. Nearly all of the 23 Democratic candidates running for president were campaigning in Iowa this weekend. President Donald Trump has two events scheduled in the state on Tuesday. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
CEDAR RAPIDS, IOWA - JUNE 09: Supporters of Democratic presidential candidate Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) wait for her to arrive at the Iowa Democratic Party's Hall of Fame Dinner on June 9, 2019 in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. Nearly all of the 23 Democratic candidates running for president were campaigning in Iowa this weekend. President Donald Trump has two events scheduled in the state on Tuesday. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
CEDAR RAPIDS, IOWA - JUNE 09: Democratic presidential candidate Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) speaks at the Iowa Democratic Party's Hall of Fame Dinner on June 9, 2019 in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. Nearly all of the 23 Democratic candidates running for president were campaigning in Iowa this weekend. President Donald Trump has two events scheduled in the state on Tuesday. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
MSNBC - Election Coverage "All In With Chris Hayes Town Hall with Elizabeth Warren" Pictured: (l-r) Chris Hayes, Elizabeth Warren (Photo by: Michael HickeyMSNBC/NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images)
SAN FRANCISCO, CA - June 1: Supporters scream as Senator Elizabeth Warren speaks to thousands of CA delegates at the 2019 California Democratic Party State Organizing Convention at the Moscone Center in San Francisco, California Saturday June 1, 2019. (Photo by Melina Mara/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
THE VIEW - Senator Elizabeth Warren is the guest today, Thursday, May 30, 2019 on Walt Disney Television via Getty Images's "The View." "The View" airs Monday-Friday, 11am-12pm, ET on Walt Disney Television via Getty Images. (Photo by Jeff Neira/Walt Disney Television via Getty Images) ELIZABETH WARREN, SUNNY HOSTIN, MEGHAN MCCAIN
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA - MAY 30: A billboard with an image of Democratic presidential hopeful U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) on May 30, 2019 in San Francisco, California. The presidential campaign for U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren posted a billboard in the South of Market Area of San Francisco that calls for breaking up big tech. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
FAIRFAX, VIRGINIA - MAY 16: Voters listen during a campaign town hall of Democratic U.S. presidential hopeful Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) at George Mason University May 16, 2019 in Fairfax, Virginia. Sen. Warren held a town hall to tell her plans for Americans and answer questions from voters. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
FAIRFAX, VIRGINIA - MAY 16: Democratic U.S. presidential hopeful Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) speaks during a campaign town hall at George Mason University May 16, 2019 in Fairfax, Virginia. Sen. Warren held a town hall to tell her plans for Americans and answer questions from voters. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren gestures as she speaks during a campaign stop at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia on May 16, 2019. (Photo by MANDEL NGAN / AFP) (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)
Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren gestures as she speaks during a campaign stop at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia on May 16, 2019. (Photo by MANDEL NGAN / AFP) (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)
People hold signs as they attend a campaign stop held by Democratic presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia on May 16, 2019. (Photo by MANDEL NGAN / AFP) (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)
PHILADELPHIA, PA - MAY 13: Democratic presidential hopeful, U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) holds Francina Seedman-Stout, 8 months, after a teacher's union townhall on May 13, 2019 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. At the event hosted by the American Federation of Teachers, Warren spoke to about 200 educators, according to published reports. (Photo by Mark Makela/Getty Images)
IOWA FALLS, IA - MAY 3: An image of 2020 presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) is seen on a book held by an attendee during a campaign event at Rivers Bend Bed & Breakfast in Iowa Falls, Iowa on May 3, 2019. (Photo by Daniel Acker for The Washington Post via Getty Images)
HOUSTON, TX - APRIL 24: Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) waves to a crowd at the She The People Presidential Forum at Texas Southern University on April 24, 2019 in Houston, Texas. Many of the Democrat presidential candidates are attending the forum to focus on issues important to women of color. (Photo by Sergio Flores/Getty Images)
HOUSTON, TX - APRIL 24: Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) speaks to a crowd at the She The People Presidential Forum at Texas Southern University on April 24, 2019 in Houston, Texas. Many of the Democrat presidential candidates are attending the forum to focus on issues important to women of color. (Photo by Sergio Flores/Getty Images)
SOMERVILLE, MA - APRIL 12: US Senator Elizabeth Warren addresses the media and Stop & Shop workers on the picket line at the Stop & Shop in Somerville, MA on April 12, 2019. US Senator Elizabeth Warren joined Stop & Shop workers on a picket line outside a Somerville store as the strike against New Englands largest supermarket chain enters its first full day Friday. Stop & Shop workers in southern New England walked off the job on Thursday, April 11, after more than 31,000 employees last month authorized their labor leaders to call for a work stoppage amid increasingly strained contract negotiations. (Photo by Craig F. Walker/The Boston Globe via Getty Images)
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“For me it’s about accountability,” she began. “I have really had it with billionaires, regardless of party, who think that the rules don’t apply to them. I’ve had it with billionaires who think their money buys them something special, so they can call women ‘fat broads’ and ‘horse-faced lesbians’ and, when someone complains about it, throw a little money on it and put a gag in the woman’s mouth. That’s not right — and that’s not going to be our candidate for president.” 

The question for Warren, however, is whether she still has a chance to be that candidate.

For months now — ever since plummeting from first place in the polls last fall — the Massachusetts senator has been searching for a comeback. But she didn’t get the boost she needed in Iowa, where she placed third, or in New Hampshire, where she finished fourth — a disappointing showing for a former frontrunner from a neighboring state that she blamed, in part, on her wan debate performance a few days earlier.

“I just didn’t say enough, didn’t fight hard enough, didn’t tell you how bad I want this and how good we could make it if we just come together,” Warren admitted at the time

It was a shortfall that Warren more than made up for Wednesday night. Every time Bloomberg tried to defend himself, she shivved him with a rhetorical razor blade. “This isn’t about how it turned out,” she said about the former mayor’s stop-and-frisk apology. “This is about what it was designed to do to begin with.” When the media mogul pushed back against allegations that his firm was rife with sexism by noting that he has, in fact, hired and promoted members of the opposite sex, Warren’s response was even more withering. “I hope you heard his defense: ‘I’ve been nice to some women,’” she said to laughter and applause. “That just doesn’t cut it.” And Warren didn’t spare her other rivals, either; often she lobbed so many haymakers in a single 75-second answer that the moderators struggled to give everyone an opportunity to respond. 

Warren’s goal, she told reporters here Thursday, was to show that Bloomberg was “actually the riskiest candidate” Democrats could nominate and to give voters a “preview” of how she might eventually dismantle the other billionaire standing between her and the White House — thus making her own candidacy seem less risky in the process. 

Will it work? It’s hard to say. But there are at least a few reasons to believe that Warren still has some fight left in her. For starters, she remains extremely popular with Democrats despite her overall polling slump. An Economist/YouGov survey released this week found her with the highest approval rating among Democrats (73 percent); more voters named her as their second choice in the latest ABC News/Washington Post poll than any other candidate. That goodwill means she has a higher “ceiling” of support than her rivals; if the tide turns and other candidates begin to falter, she could gain ground fast. 

Nevada is the place to start playing catch-up. Right now, the FiveThirtyEight polling average shows Warren in third place at 11.6 percent — more than 15 percent behind the odds-on favorite, Bernie Sanders, but only 3.5 percent behind Joe Biden. Given the challenges of polling Nevada, the strength of Warren’s Silver State organization and the complications of the caucus system, in which supporters of candidates who don’t initially clear 15 percent can “realign” with their second choice, it’s entirely plausible that Warren will beat expectations on Saturday and outpace Biden, whose campaign here is anemic. Conceivably, her blockbuster debate performance could make the difference: she raised more money Wednesday ($2.8 million) than any other candidate has raised on a debate day, and exit polling in New Hampshire showed that the debate there helped third-place finisher Amy Klobuchar leapfrog both Warren and Biden at the last minute.

Whatever happens next, the road ahead will be rocky for Warren. Sanders’s strength with Latino voters gives him an edge in delegate-rich California and Texas on Super Tuesday; Bloomberg still has unlimited funds. Early voting is also a challenge. In Nevada, an estimated 75,000 Democrats have already logged their preference, which nearly matches the total turnout from 2016, when there was no option to vote ahead of time. That could limit the impact of Warren’s debate performance. In California, Democrats have been voting since Feb. 3, with hundreds of thousands of ballots already in, and Texas began early voting on Tuesday.

Even so, the hope for Warren is that voters who flirted with Bloomberg may flee after his debate performance, and that voters previously drawn to Biden, Buttigieg or Klobuchar — black voters, college-educated white voters, women voters — will gravitate toward her now that they’ve seen how she can handle an “arrogant” New York billionaire on the debate stage. According to a Yahoo News/YouGov poll published last week, Warren performs better in one-on-one matchups against her Democratic rivals than any candidate except Sanders. She is also the only candidate who comes within the margin of error against the senator from Vermont, suggesting that she would have the best chance of beating him if and when only two candidates are left standing.

Warren hinted Thursday that that may be her plan. Speaking to reporters, she pointed out that 98 percent of the primary electorate had yet to cast a ballot; she also declined to disavow a new super-PAC that is unleashing a $1 million ad campaign on her behalf ahead of the caucuses, even though she has long criticized the practice.

“If all the candidates want to get rid of super-PACs, count me in,” she said. “I’ll lead the charge. But that’s how it has to be. It can’t be the case that a bunch of people keep them and only one or two don’t.” 

All in all, Warren’s brass-tacks approach in Nevada suggests that she knows how much is at stake — and that it will take more to win the Democratic nomination than “having a plan” for every policy issue.  

“The Democrats are getting down to the short strokes on how we’re going to pick a nominee,” she told the crowd at her North Las Vegas field office. “Now, we all know Mayor Bloomberg’s view on this: that everyone else should drop out and he’ll stay. He says Bernie can stay and he’ll take out Bernie. … Well, I’m not ready to go away.”

As the room erupted in applause, Warren waved her hand for silence. “Hey, Mayor Bloomberg,” she continued. “Before you put something out like that, give Mitch McConnell a call and see how telling that woman to sit down and shut up worked for him.” 

A chant broke out — “Persist! Persist! Persist!” — and Warren smiled.

“All I can say,” she replied, “is that we’re just getting started.” 

Nearby, a new volunteer named Andy Lane nodded his head. “The debate last night was amazing,” the 38-year-old salesman told Yahoo News. “It was the kind of fire and fury that I was hoping she would have had these last couple of months. But better late than never. I’m here to fight for her — even if it’s more of an uphill battle than I thought it would be.” 

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