Attorney General William Barr reportedly told people that he is considering quitting over Trump interference in DOJ cases

  • Attorney General William Barr reportedly told people he is considering quitting over President Donald Trump's interference in DOJ investigations.
  • The rumors of his resignation come after Barr issued a rare rebuke of the president, following Trump's tweets, saying they made it "impossible for me to do my job."
  • Justice Department spokeswoman Kerri Kupec denied the rumors of Barr's intention to resign in a tweet, saying Barr "has no plans to resign."
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

Attorney General William Barr reportedly told people he is considering resigning, The Washington Post Reported, following a day of President Donald Trump's tweets and comments about the Department of Justice.

Last week, Trump tweeted complaints about the DOJ's handling of Roger Stone's case. Stone, a longtime Trump confidant, was found guilty on seven counts, including obstruction of justice, false statements, and witness tampering related to the special counsel Robert Mueller's Russia investigation.

In an ABC News interview Barr issued a rare rebuke of the president following Trump's tweets, saying it made it "impossible for me to do my job."

In the face of Barr's request, Trump has continued to tweet. On Tuesday, he tweeted about the judge overseeing Stone's trial, and he also tweeted about federal prosecutors and former special counsel Robert Mueller who oversaw the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election.

"If I wasn't President, I'd be suing everyone all over the place," he tweeted in a missive about the Russia investigation. "BUT MAYBE I STILL WILL. WITCH HUNT."

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William Barr through the years
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William Barr through the years
FILE - In this Nov. 12, 1991 file photo, then Attorney General nominee William Barr is shown on Capitol Hill in Washington. Barr once advised the U.S. government that it could attack Iraq without Congressional approval, arrest a deposed foreign dictator and capture suspects abroad without that country’s permission. Those decisions reflect a broad view of presidential power that Barr, President Donald Trump's pick to reclaim his old attorney general job, demonstrated at the Justice Department and in the years since. (AP Photo/John Duricka)
U.S. President George H. Bush signs into law new civil rights guarantees for women and minorities at a Rose Garden ceremony, Thursday, Nov. 21, 1991 in Washington, as Vice President Dan Quayle, left, and Acting Attorney General William Barr look on. The bill signing capped a two-year struggle with congress over whether the legislation encouraged job quotas. (AP Photo/Marcy Nighswander)
U.S. President George H. Bush, right, and William Barr wave after Barr was sworn in as the new Attorney General of the United States, Tuesday, Nov. 26, 1991 at a Justice Department ceremony in Washington. (AP Photo/Scott Applewhite)
U.S. President George H. Bush gestures while talking to Attorney General William Barr in the Oval Office of the White House, Monday, May 4, 1992 in Washington. The President met with top domestic Cabinet officers to tackle long-range problems pushed to the forefront by last week's deadly riots in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Marcy Nighswander)
Board member of MCI Telecommunications, Nicholas Katzenbach, second left, speaks at hearing before the Senate Committee on the Judiciary on "The WorldCom Case: Looking at Bankruptcy and Competition Issues" on Capitol Hill in Washington Tuesday, July 22, 2003. Witnesses are, from left, Executive Vice President and General Counsel of Verizon Communications William Barr, Katzenbach, Weil Gotshal & Manges LLP's Marcia Goldstein, Communications Workers of America President Morton Bahr, National Bankruptcy Conference Vice-Chair Douglas Baird, Cerberus Capital Management Chief Operation Officer Mark Neporent. (AP Photo/Akira Ono)
Former Georgia Congressman Bob Barr, left, listens as William Redpath, Libertarian Party national chairman, answers a question at a news conference in Oklahoma City, Tuesday, Oct. 23, 2007. (AP Photo)
President Donald Trump's attorney general nominee, William Barr, meets with Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2019. Barr, who served in the position in the early 1990s, has a confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee next week and could be in place at the Justice Department as soon as February when Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein leaves after Barr is confirmed. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
President Donald Trump's attorney general nominee, William Barr, left, meets with Senate Judiciary Committee member and Trump confidant Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2019. Barr, who served in the position in the early 1990s, has a confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee next week and could be in place at the Justice Department as soon as February when Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein leaves after Barr is confirmed. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
President Donald Trump's attorney general nominee, William Barr, arrives to meet with Senate Judiciary Committee member and Trump confidant Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2019. Barr, who served in the position in the early 1990s, has a confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee next week and could be in place at the Justice Department as soon as February when Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein leaves after Barr is confirmed. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
President Donald Trump's attorney general nominee, William Barr, right, meets with Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2019. Barr, who served in the position in the early 1990s, has a confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee next week and could be in place at the Justice Department as soon as February when Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein leaves after Barr is confirmed. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
Attorney General nominee William Barr , left, turns to answer a reporter's question as he arrives to meet with Sen. Ben Sasse, R-Neb., on Capitol Hill, Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2019 in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
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Trump continued his remarks about the DOJ, telling reporters on Tuesday that he was the "chief law-enforcement officer of the United States" and admitting that he does make Barr's job more difficult.

Sources close to the attorney general and the president told The Post that the tensions between Barr and Trump have pushed him near his "limits," thus putting thoughts of resignation on his radar.

However, Justice Department spokeswoman Kerri Kupec denied the rumors of Barr's intention to resign in a tweet.

The New York Times reported that the resignation rumors could have been sparked by Barr expressing dissatisfaction and irritation at the president's constant assertions over the Justice Department.

 

 

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