Trump takes shot at Romney at National Prayer Breakfast

At the National Prayer Breakfast on Thursday, President Trump celebrated his acquittal in the Senate impeachment trial, attacking Democrats and taking an apparent shot at Republican Sen. Mitt Romney, who crossed party lines in voting to remove him from office.

“As you know, our great country, and your president, have been put through a terrible ordeal by some very dishonest and corrupt people, and by so doing, very badly hurt our nation,” Trump said, reading from a teleprompter. “Yesterday, courageous Republican politicians and leaders had the wisdom, fortitude and strength to do what everyone knows was right.”

It was the president’s first public appearance since the Senate voted to acquit him of the charges contained in two articles of impeachment — abuse of power and obstruction of Congress — that had been endorsed by the House of Representatives in December.

Before the vote, Romney announced he would vote to convict Trump for abuse of power.

“Corrupting an election to keep oneself in office is perhaps the most abusive and destructive violation of one’s oath of office that I can imagine,” Romney said, adding: “I swore an oath before God to exercise impartial justice. I am profoundly religious. My faith is at the heart of who I am.”

At the prayer breakfast, Trump said, “I don’t like people who use their faith as justification for doing what they know is wrong.”

The president was scheduled to deliver a statement related to his impeachment “victory” at the White House later Thursday.

Related: Senate acquits Trump in impeachment trial

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Senate acquits Trump in impeachment trail
Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer of N.Y., right, arrives on Capitol Hill, Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky., walks towards the Senate floor on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2020. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., pauses as he speaks with reporters during the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump on charges of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2020. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, looks out from an elevator on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2020. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., left, walks on Capitol Hill in Washington during the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump on charges of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress, Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2020. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., stands at the top of an escalator on Capitol Hill in Washington during the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump on charges of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress, Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2020. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
Sen. Doug Jones, D-Ala., center, walks on Capitol Hill in Washington during the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump on charges of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress, Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2020. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
Trump legal team members Jane Raskin, left, and White House adviser and former Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi arrive on Capitol Hill, Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2020 in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., speaks with reporters during the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump on charges of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2020. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., right, arrives on Capitol Hill, Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2020 in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
Presiding officer Chief Justice of the United States John Roberts, right, arrives on Capitol Hill, Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2020 in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer of N.Y., right, arrives on Capitol Hill, Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
Sen. Kyrsten Sinema, D-Ariz., arrives on Capitol Hill, Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2020 in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
Sen. Todd Young, R-Ind., center, speaks with reporters during the impeachment trial of President Donald Trump on charges of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2020. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
In this image from video, Chief Justice of the United States John Roberts speaks before the vote in the impeachment trial against President Donald Trump in the Senate at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2020. (Senate Television via AP)
In this image from video, presiding officer Chief Justice of the United States John Roberts reads the results of the vote on the first article of impeachment, abuse of power, during the impeachment trial against President Donald Trump in the Senate at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2020. The Senate vote for not guilty was 52-48. (Senate Television via AP)
In this image from video, Chief Justice of the United States John Roberts arrives for the vote in the impeachment trial against President Donald Trump in the Senate at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, Feb. 5, 2020. (Senate Television via AP)
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Earlier, before taking his seat, the president held up a copy of the USA Today, with the headline “ACQUITTED” splashed across the top of its front page. The crowd inside the Washington Hilton applauded.

Trump did the same with a copy of the Washington Post and its headline: “Trump Acquitted.”

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, who signed off on inquiry that led to Trump’s impeachment, was the first speaker at the annual event, saying a prayer for the “poor and persecuted.”

As Pelosi was introduced, the president, visibly annoyed, folded his arms and looked away. In his own remarks, Trump also appeared to take a shot at Pelosi, who has repeatedly said she prays for Trump when asked about him.

"Nor do I like people who say 'I pray for you' when they know that that's not so," he said. "So many people have been hurt. We can't let that go on. And I'll be discussing that a little bit later at the White House."

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