Food dropped from planes to feed animals amid bush fires

Thousands of pounds of food were delivered to Australia to aid animals whose homeland has been destroyed by the horrific bushfires.

The food was dropped from planes across New South Wales on Saturday to help the colonies of brush-tailed rock-wallabies that inhabit the state in southeastern Australia.

A photo of carrots being dropped — as well as another showing a wallaby eating the orange root vegetable — was posted to Twitter by the state’s minister for energy and environment, Matt Kean.

Kean dubbed the initiative #OperationRockWallaby and noted that mostly carrots and sweet potatoes were delivered for the animals.

“One happy customer,” he captioned the image of a wallaby eating a carrot.

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In this image made from video, officials block the Princes Highway as wildfires approach in South Coast, New South Wales Australia, Tuesday, Dec. 31, 2019. Wildfires burning across Australia's two most-populous states have trapped residents of a seaside town in apocalyptic conditions, destroyed many properties and caused fatalities. (Australian Broadcasting Corporation, Channel 9, Channel 7 via AP)
Kangaroos graze in a field as smoke shrouds the Australian capital of Canberra, Australia, Wednesday, Jan. 1, 2020. Australia deployed military ships and aircraft to help communities ravaged by apocalyptic wildfires that destroyed homes and sent thousands of residents and holidaymakers fleeing to the shoreline. (AP Photo/Mark Baker)
In this image dated Dec. 30, 2019, and provided by NSW Rural Fire Service via their twitter account, firefighters are seen as they try to protect homes around Charmhaven, New South Wales. Wildfires burning across Australia's two most-populous states Tuesday trapped residents of a seaside town in apocalyptic conditions, destroyed many properties and caused fatalities. (Twitter@NSWRFS via AP)
In this image made from video, officials block the Princes Highway as wildfires approach in South Coast, New South Wales Australia, Tuesday, Dec. 31, 2019. Wildfires burning across Australia's two most-populous states have trapped residents of a seaside town in apocalyptic conditions, destroyed many properties and caused fatalities. (Australian Broadcasting Corporation, Channel 9, Channel 7 via AP)
In this image made from video, vehicles are parked during a road closure as smoke rises in the rear, Tuesday, Dec. 31, 2019, in Brogo, new South Wales, Australia. Wildfires burning across Australia's two most-populous states have trapped residents of a seaside town in apocalyptic conditions, destroyed many properties and caused at least two fatalities. (Australian Broadcasting Corporation, Channel 9, Channel 7 via AP)
In this image made from video, a fire is extinguished behind a house in Mollymook, New south Wales, Australia, Tuesday, Derc. 31, 2019. Wildfires burning across Australia's two most-populous states have trapped residents of a seaside town in apocalyptic conditions, destroyed many properties and caused at least two fatalities. (Australian Broadcasting Corporation, Channel 9, Channel 7 via AP)
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Last week, Professor Chris Dickman, a scientist at the University of Sydney, estimated that more than 1 billion animals across Australia have been killed by the fires, including more than 800 million in New South Wales alone. That was a significant jump from his estimate a few weeks earlier that more than 480 million animals had died.

At least 28 people have died since the bushfires began last September.

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