Poll: Most Americans disapprove of Trump approach to Iran

 

Americans by and large do not approve of how President Trump is handling the situation with Iran, according to a new poll.

Fifty-six percent of American voters say they disapprove of how Trump has handled the situation with Iran, according to a poll conducted by Ipsos for ABC News. On top of that, 52% of Americans say the airstrike ordered by President Trump to assassinate Iranian General Qassem Soliemani has made them less safe. 

And, a net total of 94% of Democrats and 52% of Republicans said they are either somewhat concerned or very concerned about entering into another war in the Middle East. Only 43% of Americans approved how Trump is handling the situation with Iran. 

The poll was conducted between January 10 and 11 and surveyed 525 US voters over the age of 18. 

Trump ordered the drone strike that killed Soleimani on January 3. On Thursday, Trump said at a press conference he ordered the strike because he had recieved intelligence that Soleimani was plotting to bomb the US embassy in Iraq.

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Trump pulls US from Iran nuclear deal
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Trump pulls US from Iran nuclear deal
US President Donald Trump signs a document reinstating sanctions against Iran after announcing the US withdrawal from the Iran Nuclear deal, in the Diplomatic Reception Room at the White House in Washington, DC, on May 8, 2018. (Photo by SAUL LOEB / AFP) (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
U.S. President Donald Trump announces his intention to withdraw from the JCPOA Iran nuclear agreement during a statement in the Diplomatic Room at the White House in Washington, U.S., May 8, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
US President Donald Trump signs a document reinstating sanctions against Iran after announcing the US withdrawal from the Iran Nuclear deal, in the Diplomatic Reception Room at the White House in Washington, DC, on May 8, 2018. (Photo by SAUL LOEB / AFP) (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
U.S. President Donald Trump announces his intention to withdraw from the JCPOA Iran nuclear agreement during a statement in the Diplomatic Room at the White House in Washington, U.S., May 8, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. President Donald Trump reacts to a question from the media after announcing his intention to withdraw from the JCPOA Iran nuclear agreement during a statement in the Diplomatic Room at the White House in Washington, U.S., May 8, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. President Donald Trump announces his intent to withdraw from the JCPOA Iran nuclear agreement in the Diplomatic Room at the White House in Washington, U.S., May 8, 2018. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 08: U.S. President Donald Trump holds up a memorandum that re-instates sanctions on Iran after he announced his decision to withdraw the United States from the 2015 Iran nuclear deal in the Diplomatic Room at the White House May 8, 2018 in Washington, DC. After two and a half years of negotiations, Iran agreed in 2015 to end its nuclear program in exchange for Western countries, including the United States, lifting decades of economic sanctions. Since then international inspectors have not found any violations of the terms by Iran. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)
US President Donald Trump announces his decision on the Iran nuclear deal in the Diplomatic Reception Room at the White House in Washington, DC, on May 8, 2018. (Photo by SAUL LOEB / AFP) (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
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"We did it because they were looking to blow up our embassy," Trump told reporters. "We also did it for other reasons that were very obvious. Somebody died, one of our military people died, people were badly wounded just a week before."

That assertion has been called into question by congressional Democrats and other officials in recent days. 

On Sunday, Secretary of Defense Mark Esper backed up Trump's claim of an imminent threat on multiple embassies during an appearance on  CBS' "Face the Nation," but said that he hadn't directly seen evidence of potential threats on embassies, as Trump had said.

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