Pastor who says Jews are going to hell speaks at Trump's Hanukkah party

President Donald Trump signed an executive order aimed at tackling anti-Semitism on college campuses on Wednesday ― but one of the speakers at the event has said that Jews are going to hell. 

Trump signed the order at a White House Hanukkah reception, with several prominent Jewish Americans in attendance, including New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft and Harvard law professor Alan Dershowitz

But the president also called upon evangelical Christian leader Robert Jeffress to speak, claiming he’s a “tremendous faith leader.”

Jeffress, in turn, called Trump “the most pro-faith president in history.” 

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Pastor Robert Jeffress speaks before U.S. President Donald Trump at the Celebrate Freedom Rally in Washington, U.S. July 1, 2017. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas
Pastor Robert Jeffress, pastor of the First Baptist Church in Dallas, introduces US President Donald Trump at the Celebrate Freedom concert at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, DC on July 1, 2017. / AFP PHOTO / MANDEL NGAN (Photo credit should read MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)
U.S. President Donald Trump, left, speaks with pastor Robert Jeffress during the 'Celebrate Freedom' event at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Saturday, July 1, 2017. Trump�returned to the relatively calm waters of patriotism and supporting American troops in a speech on Saturday night that followed several outbursts against the media and others on social media earlier in the day. Photographer: Olivier Douliery/Bloomberg via Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - JULY 01: (AFP OUT) US President Donald Trump is greeting by Pastor Robert Jeffress during the Celebrate Freedom Rally at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts on July 1, 2017 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Olivier Douliery-Pool via Getty Images)
U.S. President Donald Trump, right, applauds as pastor Robert Jeffress waves during the 'Celebrate Freedom' event at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Saturday, July 1, 2017. Trump returned to the relatively calm waters of patriotism and supporting American troops in a speech on Saturday night that followed several outbursts against the media and others on social media earlier in the day. Photographer: Olivier Douliery/Bloomberg via Getty Images
AUSTIN, TX - JULY 08: The Rev. Robert Jeffress, the controversial pastor of First Baptist Church in Dallas, energized the crowd by describing the debate over abortion as a fight 'between the kingdom of God and the kingdom of Satan,' as pro-life supporters and pro-choice protesters rally at the Texas state capitol in favor and against the new controversial abortion legislation up for a vote in the state legislature on July 8, 2013 in Austin Texas. Texas Gov. Rick Perry called on a second legislative special session to pass an restrictive abortion law through the Texas legislature. The first attempt was defeated after opponents of the law were able to stall the vote until after first special session had ended. (Photo by Erich Schlegel/Getty Images)
Pastor Robert Jeffress arrives in the lobby of Trump Tower in New York, U.S., on Tuesday, Jan. 3, 2016. President-elect Donald Trump threatened to punish General Motors Co. for building a version of its fading compact car in Mexico, rekindling a months-old feud with the auto industry and earning a terse response from the company challenging his assertions. Photographer: Albin Lohr-Jones/Pool via Bloomberg
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But Jeffress has a long history of hateful comments toward other faiths.

In 2010, he called both Islam and Mormonism “a heresy from the pit of hell,” then issued a warning to Jews. 

Judaism ― you can’t be saved being a Jew,” he declared on the Trinity Broadcasting Network. 

In a 2009 sermon, he said: 

“Not only do religions like Mormonism, Islam, Judaism, Hinduism, not only do they lead people away from the true God, they lead people to an eternity of separation from God in hell. You know, Jesus was very clear. Hell is not only going to be populated by murderers and drug dealers and child abusers. Hell is going to be filled with good religious people who have rejected the truth of Christ.”

Jeffress often speaks in support of Trump on cable networks and radio, and earlier this year he said evangelicals who don’t support the president are “spineless morons.” 

He predicted in September that removing Trump via impeachment would lead to a “Civil War-like fracture.”  

Trump has noticed ― and appreciated ― the stream of praise. 

“I’d watch him on different shows, and I’d say, ‘I like that guy. Man, he talks really great about me,’” Trump said at the Hanukkah event on Wednesday. “And I like people that talk well about me.”

Hanukkah begins Dec. 22.

  • This article originally appeared on HuffPost.
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