U.K. PM Johnson implores Trump: please avoid the election

LONDON, Nov 29 (Reuters) - Prime Minister Boris Johnson said it was best if U.S. President Donald Trump did not get involved in Britain's upcoming election when he visits London for a NATO summit next week.

"What we don't do traditionally as loving allies and friends, what we don't do traditionally, is get involved in each other's election campaigns," said Johnson, whose Conservative Party has a commanding lead in the polls ahead of the Dec. 12.

"The best (thing) when you have close friends and allies like the U.S. and the UK is for neither side to get involved in each other's election."

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Boris Johnson at his party's annual conference
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Boris Johnson at his party's annual conference
Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson arrives for interviews at the Conservative Party Conference in Manchester, England, Tuesday, Oct. 1, 2019. Boris Johnson said Tuesday that his government prepared at last to make firm proposals for a new divorce deal with the European Union. Britain is due to leave the 28-nation bloc at the end of this month, and EU leaders are growing impatient with the U.K.'s failure to set out detailed plans for maintaining an open border between Northern Ireland and Ireland — the key sticking point to a deal. (AP Photo/Frank Augstein)
Prime Minister Boris Johnson reacts as he listens to Sajid Javid, Chancellor of the Exchequer, as he delivers his speech at the Conservative Party Conference in Manchester, England, Monday, Sept. 30, 2019. The Conservative Party is holding its annual party conference as scheduled. (AP Photo/Frank Augstein)
Prime Minister Boris Johnson applauds as he listens to Sajid Javid, Chancellor of the Exchequer, as he delivers his speech at the Conservative Party Conference in Manchester, England, Monday, Sept. 30, 2019. The Conservative Party is holding its annual party conference as scheduled. (AP Photo/Frank Augstein)
Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson and Home Secretary Priti Patel walk towards the Conservative Party Conference in Manchester, England, Monday, Sept. 30, 2019.(AP Photo/Frank Augstein)
Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson and Home Secretary Priti Patel walk towards the Conservative Party Conference in Manchester, England, Monday, Sept. 30, 2019.(AP Photo/Frank Augstein)
Prime Minister Boris Johnson gives a thumb up after Sajid Javid, Chancellor of the Exchequer, delivered his speech at the Conservative Party Conference in Manchester, England, Monday, Sept. 30, 2019.(AP Photo/Frank Augstein)
Delegates spend their lunch break outside at the Conservative Party Conference in Manchester, England, Monday, Sept. 30, 2019. U.K. Prime Minister Boris Johnson faced political opposition and personal allegations Monday as he tried to fulfil his pledge to lead Britain out of the European Union in just over a month. (AP Photo/Frank Augstein)
Prime Minister Boris Johnson enters the hall to do morning interviews at the Conservative Party Conference in Manchester. (Photo by Peter Byrne/PA Images via Getty Images)
MANCHESTER, ENGLAND - OCTOBER 01: Prime Minister Boris Johnson arrives for the third day of the Conservative Party Conference at Manchester Central on October 1, 2019 in Manchester, England. Despite Parliament voting against a government motion to award a recess, Conservative Party Conference still goes ahead. Parliament will continue with its business for the duration. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson is seen outside the venue for the Conservative Party annual conference in Manchester, Britain October 1, 2019. REUTERS/Henry Nicholls
Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson is seen outside the venue for the Conservative Party annual conference in Manchester, Britain October 1, 2019. REUTERS/Henry Nicholls
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Trump has already waded into the election, saying in October left-wing opposition leader Labour Party, Jeremy Corbyn, would be "so bad" for Britain and that Johnson should do a pact with Brexit Party leader Nigel Farage.

Corbyn has used Trump's praise of Johnson as one of his focal messages to attack the Conservatives in his campaign, saying they would sell off parts of the much-loved state-run National Health Service to the U.S. businesses after Brexit if they win the election. 

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