More than 11,000 scientists worldwide declare climate emergency, predict ‘untold human suffering’ if we do not act now

Scientists worldwide — 11,258 of them, to be exact, from 153 countries — have endorsed a declaration of “climate emergency,” predicting “untold human suffering” if more is not done to stop human contribution to climate change.

Citing scientists’ “moral obligation to clearly warn humanity of any catastrophic threat,” the researchers endorsed an urgent call to action, pleading with humankind to stop being our own worst enemy.

“We declare, with more than 11,000 scientist signatories from around the world, clearly and unequivocally that planet Earth is facing a climate emergency,” the scientists said in a statement, adding that despite decades of warnings, “greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are still rapidly rising, with increasingly damaging effects on the Earth’s climate. An immense increase of scale in endeavors to conserve our biosphere is needed to avoid untold suffering due to the climate crisis.”

Ecology professor William Ripple and Christopher Wolf of Oregon State University led the peer-reviewed research, which was published Tuesday in the journal BioScience. Ripple founded the environmental advocacy group Alliance of World Scientists.

“Despite 40 years of major global negotiations, we have continued to conduct business as usual and have failed to address this crisis,” said Ripple, distinguished professor of ecology in the Oregon State College of Forestry, in a statement. “Climate change has arrived and is accelerating faster than many scientists expected.”

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Spring Creek and Lake Christine fires in Colorado
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Spring Creek and Lake Christine fires in Colorado
BASALT, CO - JULY 04: A view of the Lake Christine fire as it rises behind Elk Run on July 4, 2018 in Basalt, Colorado. (Photo by Chris Council/Getty Images)
LA VETA, CO - JULY 4: Brandon Laird holds his daughter Emmy, 4, as they watch the sun sets over the Spring Creek Fire on July 4, 2018 in La Veta, Colorado. They are evacuees who have a family cabin in Cuchara and hoping to go home soon. (Photo by Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post via Getty Images)
FT. GARLAND, CO - JULY 05: Evacuees Rudy Garcia, left, and his wife of 63-years Delores, from San Antonio Texas, look over the Spring Fire map from the American Red Cross shelter at the Ft. Garland Community Center July 05, 2018. Their summer home was spared from the flames, which has consumed over 100,000 acres and has destroyed over 130 homes. (Photo by Andy Cross/The Denver Post via Getty Images)
BASALT, CO - JULY 04: The Lake Christine fire burns the hillside at the base of Basalt Mountain behind the Basalt Middle School on July 4, 2018 in Basalt, Colorado. (Photo by Chris Council/Getty Images)
FT. GARLAND, CO - JULY 05: Wild land firefighters walk to camp at the Ft. Garland Community Center after spending a long day fighting the Spring Fire July 05, 2018. The Spring fire has consumed over 100,000 acres and has destroyed over 130 homes. (Photo by Andy Cross/The Denver Post via Getty Images)
WALSENBURG, CO - JULY 5: Mike Duran and his son Roy, load donated hay and grain into their truck outside of the Rio Cucharas Veterinary Clinic on July 5, 2018 in Walsenburg, Colorado. Due to the massive Spring Creek Fire many ranchers who own horses and cattle are scrambling trying to find hay and grain to feed their livestock. Much of the grazing area for the animals has either burned or is under evacuation which leaves the owners with no place for their animals. Many of the evacuated animals are at the Huerfano County Fairgrounds. Others have been taken to area ranches. People are worried about the long term effects of the fire for their livestock. (Photo by Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post via Getty Images)
BASALT, CO - JULY 04: The streets of downtown Basalt were deserted late Wednesday night as the Lake Christine fire burns at the base of Basalt Mountain on July 4, 2018 in Basalt, Colorado. (Photo by Chris Council/Getty Images)
LA VETA, CO - JULY 4: The sun sets over the southern portion of the Spring Creek Fire on July 4, 2018 in La Veta, Colorado. (Photo by Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post via Getty Images)
LA VETA, CO - JULY 4: A relieved Dennis Ceremuga holding his horse Cody, gets ready to let local veterinarian Dr. Romy Nicoletta, left, check him out near his house in Piney Ridge Ranch on July 4, 2018 in La Veta, Colorado. Ceremuga and his wife Kate McCabe had to evacuate the night of the Spring Creek Fire and were only able to let their horses loose from their corrals. The corrals and the woods around their house burned but their 3 horses and their home survived. Because the fire was too intense the couple were unable to get to the horses until today. The horses have been in the burn area since the beginning of the fire a week ago. They were hungry and thirsty but otherwise in generally good health. (Photo by Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post via Getty Images)
BASALT, CO - JULY 04: The streets of downtown Basalt were deserted late Wednesday night as the Lake Christine fire burns at the base of Basalt Mountain on July 4, 2018 in Basalt, Colorado. (Photo by Chris Council/Getty Images)
FT. GARLAND, CO - JULY 05: A wild land firefighter walks to camp at the Ft. Garland Community Center after spending a long day fighting the Spring Fire July 05, 2018. The Spring fire has consumed over 100,000 acres and has destroyed over 130 homes. (Photo by Andy Cross/The Denver Post via Getty Images)
LA VETA, CO - JULY 5: Veterinarian Dr. Romy Nicoletta, left, gives a hug to fire evacuee and goat owner Karen Bayci after checking on her goats at the Huerfano County Fairgrounds during the Spring Creek Fire on July 5, 2018 in La Veta, Colorado. Bayci's goat Button has been fighting an infection and has been unable to milk her 2 babies. Nicoletta has been working 24/7 to help fire displaced people and their animals all free of charge. She oversees all kinds of animals from horses and cattle to goats, dogs, cats, chickens and any other small animals. Many of the evacuated animals are at the Huerfano County Fairgrounds. She owns the Rio Cucharas Veterinary Clinic and is the first woman vet in the area ever. The clinic is taking any kinds of donations as currently Nicoletta is paying for all her medical supplies and services out of her own pocket. Bayci had to evacuate her house because of the Spring Creek Fire and took with her 14 goats, 2 mules, 6 birds, 2 cats and a chicken. (Photo by Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post via Getty Images)
BASALT, CO - JULY 04: The Lake Christine fire burns at the base of Basalt Mountain behind the town late on the night of July 4, 2018 in Basalt, Colorado.
FT. GARLAND, CO - JULY 05: South Metro wild land firefighters Dustin Searle, left, and Wes Polk, right, unload gear after arriving back to camp at the Ft. Garland Community Center after spending a long day fighting the Spring Fire July 05, 2018. The Spring fire has consumed over 100,000 acres and has destroyed over 130 homes. (Photo by Andy Cross/The Denver Post via Getty Images)
FT. GARLAND, CO - JULY 05: A thank you card poster awaits firefighters inside the American Red Cross shelter at the Ft. Garland Community Center July 05, 2018. The Spring fire has consumed over 100,000 acres and has destroyed over 130 homes. (Photo by Andy Cross/The Denver Post via Getty Images)
BASALT, CO - JULY 05: The Lake Christine fire lights up the night sky with Highway 82 in the foreground, as viewed from the trestle bridge on the Rio Grande trail near the Roaring Fork Club on July 5, 2018 in Basalt, Colorado.
LA VETA, CO - JULY 5: Veterinarian Dr. Romy Nicoletta gives Prince, a baby goat, a hug after checking on goats at Huerfano County Fairgrounds during the Spring Creek Fire on July 5, 2018 in La Veta, Colorado. Nicoletta has been working 24/7 to help fire displaced people and their animals all free of charge. She oversees all kinds of animals from horses and cattle to goats, dogs, cats, chickens and any other small animals. Many of the evacuated animals are at the Huerfano County Fairgrounds. She owns the Rio Cucharas Veterinary Clinic and is the first woman vet in the area ever. The clinic is taking any kinds of donations as currently Nicoletta is paying for all her medical supplies and services out of her own pocket. Behind her is goat owner Karen Bayci. (Photo by Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post via Getty Images)
LA VETA, CO - JULY 4: Two baby Mule deer fawns hide out in the shade near the spike camp for firefighters of the Spring Creek Fire on July 4, 2018 in La Veta, Colorado. The fire has now burned 94,125 acres and crews have only 5% containment. (Photo by Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post via Getty Images)
LA VETA, CO - JULY 3: Ty Warren leaves a pen where his father's cattle are being kept at the Huerfano County Fairgrounds where displaced people have brought their pets for safe keeping as the Spring Creek Fire continues to burn on July 3, 2018 in La Veta, Colorado. The Spring Creek Fire in Costilla county has so far burned 78,941 acres and is 5% contained. Over 100 structures have burned in the fast moving fire. All kinds of animals have been brought to the site including horses, cows, pigs, goats, dogs, ducks, and chickens. (Photo by Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post via Getty Images)
LA VETA, CO - JULY 3: La Veta homeowners Calvin Hopkins, left, and Cheryl Willburn watch the movement of the Spring Creek Fire as it continues to burn in Costilla county on July 3, 2018 in La Veta, Colorado. The Spring Creek Fire in Costilla county has so far burned 78,941 acres and is 5% contained. Over 100 structures have burned in the fast moving fire. (Photo by Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post via Getty Images)
LA VETA, CO - JULY 3: La Veta Marshall Harold Willburn watches the movement of Tthe Spring Creek Fire as it continues to burn in Costilla county on July 3, 2018 in La Veta, Colorado. The Spring Creek Fire in Costilla county has so far burned 78,941 acres and is 5% contained. Over 100 structures have burned in the fast moving fire. (Photo by Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post via Getty Images)
LA VETA, CO - JULY 4: Rosebud Sioux firefighter Chance Wooden Knife, left, throws a bad of ice to firefighter Smokey Kills Smart, right, at the spike camp as their Type II initial attack hand crew gets ready to head out on the Spring Creek Fire on July 4, 2018 in La Veta, Colorado. The fire has now burned 94,125 acres and crews have only 5% containment. (Photo by Helen H. Richardson/The Denver Post via Getty Images)
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While scientists have been sounding the alarm for decades, this is the first time they have stepped into the political arena by recommending policy, The Washington Post noted. That and the lack of uncertainty in the language makes this document a “stark departure” from previous assessments, the Post said.

It is the first time this many scientists have spoken directly to the public that there’s a crisis, “rather than letting their data speak for itself,” reported Grist, the environmental news site.

“Phrases like ‘climate change’ sound a little bit mild, in terms of how severe the problem is,” Ripple told Grist. “So, we wanted to publish language that is consistent with the data and the trends that we’re seeing.”

The warning comes a day after President Trump’s administration submitted formal notice that the U.S. is pulling out of the Paris Climate Agreement, as the Associated Press and The New Republic reported. And, as Phys.org reported, the European Union confirmed that last month was the warmest October ever registered.

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Drone photos of glacier show impact of climate change
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Drone photos of glacier show impact of climate change
An iceberg floats in a fjord near the town of Tasiilaq, Greenland, June 24, 2018. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson SEARCH "JACKSON GREENLAND" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Principal Investigator Josh Willis looks out at the Greenland ice sheet from inside of a NASA Gulfstream III flying above Greenland to measure loss to the country's ice sheet as part of the Oceans Melting Greenland (OMG) research mission, March 13, 2018. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson
Glacial flow is seen out the window of a NASA Gulfstream III flight to support the Oceans Melting Greenland (OMG) research mission above the east coast of Greenland, March 13, 2018. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson SEARCH "JACKSON GREENLAND" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Safety officer Brian Rougeux works with student Febin Magar to assemble a radar dome while working in a science camp on the side of the Helheim glacier near Tasiilaq, Greenland, June 20, 2018. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson SEARCH "JACKSON GREENLAND" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Meltwater pools are seen on top of the Helheim glacier near Tasiilaq, Greenland, June 19, 2018. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson SEARCH "JACKSON GREENLAND" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Radar Engineer, Ron Muellerschoen, monitors data collection inside a NASA Gulfstream III flying above Greenland to measure loss to the country's ice sheet as part of the Oceans Melting Greenland (OMG) research mission, March 12, 2018. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson SEARCH "JACKSON GREENLAND" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
A glacial terminus is seen from the window during a NASA flight to support the Oceans Melting Greenland (OMG) research mission above the east coast of Greenland, March 13, 2018. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson SEARCH "JACKSON GREENLAND" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY.
Student Febin Magar watches as leftover wood burns in a research camp on the side of the Helheim glacier near Tasiilaq, Greenland, June 20, 2018. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson SEARCH "JACKSON GREENLAND" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Safety officer Brian Rougeux uses a drill to install antennas for scientific instruments that will be left on top of the Helheim glacier near Tasiilaq, Greenland, June 19, 2018. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson SEARCH "JACKSON GREENLAND" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Oceanographer David Holland works with student Febin Magar to inspect a seismograph in their science camp on the side of the Helheim glacier near Tasiilaq, Greenland, June 20, 2018. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson SEARCH "JACKSON GREENLAND" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Tabular icebergs float in the Sermilik Fjord after a large calving event at the Helheim glacier near Tasiilaq, Greenland, June 23, 2018. This portion between the glacier front and the open ocean is known as the "melange" and is filled with ice, snow and icebergs packed together on their way to a fjord and later the ocean. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson SEARCH "JACKSON GREENLAND" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES. TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
An iceberg floats in a fjord near the town of Tasiilaq, Greenland, June 18, 2018. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson SEARCH "JACKSON GREENLAND" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Meltwater pools are seen on top of the Helheim glacier near Tasiilaq, Greenland, June 19, 2018. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson SEARCH "JACKSON GREENLAND" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Oceanographer David Holland (C) eats with Denise Holland (L), safety officer Brian Rougeux and student Febin Magar (R) in their science camp on the side of the Helheim glacier near Tasiilaq, Greenland, June 19, 2018. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson SEARCH "JACKSON GREENLAND" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Safety officer Brian Rougeux carries a piece of a radar dome while working in a science camp on the side of the Helheim glacier near Tasiilaq, Greenland, June 20, 2018. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson SEARCH "JACKSON GREENLAND" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Oceanographer David Holland repairs a broken GPS module at his research camp above the Helheim glacier near Tasiilaq, Greenland, June 20, 2018. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson SEARCH "JACKSON GREENLAND" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Glacial ice is seen from the window during a NASA flight to support the Oceans Melting Greenland (OMG) research mission above the east coast of Greenland, March 13, 2018. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson SEARCH "JACKSON GREENLAND" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Sunshine lights up the Helheim glacier near Tasiilaq, Greenland, June 22, 2018. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson SEARCH "JACKSON GREENLAND" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
An aerial photograph of Oceanographer David Holland's science camp on the side of the Helheim glacier near Tasiilaq, Greenland, June 20, 2018. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson SEARCH "JACKSON GREENLAND" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Airplane Mechanic, David Fuller (L), works with a local worker to move a NASA Gulfstream III during a pre-flight inspection before a flight to support the Oceans Melting Greenland (OMG) research mission, March 12, 2018. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson SEARCH "JACKSON GREENLAND" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Airplane Mechanic, David Fuller, inspects a NASA Gulfstream III during a pre-flight inspection before a flight to support the Oceans Melting Greenland (OMG) research mission, March 12, 2018. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson SEARCH "JACKSON GREENLAND" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Radar Engineer Ron Muellerschoen (L), Radar Engineer Tim Miller (C) and Pilot in Command Tom Parent discuss issues with an autopilot system while flying inside a NASA Gulfstream III above Greenland to measure loss to the country's ice sheet as part of the Oceans Melting Greenland (OMG) research mission, March 13, 2018. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson SEARCH "JACKSON GREENLAND" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
An iceberg floats in a fjord near the town of Tasiilaq, Greenland, June 24, 2018. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson SEARCH "JACKSON GREENLAND" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
An iceberg floats in a fjord near the town of Tasiilaq, Greenland, June 24, 2018. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson SEARCH "JACKSON GREENLAND" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
An iceberg floats in a fjord near the town of Tasiilaq, Greenland, June 24, 2018. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson SEARCH "JACKSON GREENLAND" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
An iceberg floats in a fjord near the town of Tasiilaq, Greenland, June 24, 2018. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson SEARCH "JACKSON GREENLAND" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Pilot in Command Tom Parent inspects the exterior of a NASA Gulfstream III during a pre-flight inspection of the aircraft before a flight to support the Oceans Melting Greenland (OMG) research mission, March 12, 2018. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson SEARCH "JACKSON GREENLAND" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Student Febin Magar watches as safety officer Brian Rougeux burns leftover wood while working in a science camp on the side of the Helheim glacier near Tasiilaq, Greenland, June 20, 2018. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson SEARCH "JACKSON GREENLAND" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Safety officer Brian Rougeux unfastens equipment to inspect it while working in a science camp on the side of the Helheim glacier near Tasiilaq, Greenland, June 22, 2018. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson SEARCH "JACKSON GREENLAND" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Safety officer Brian Rougeux works to build a semi-permanent structure in a science camp on the side of the Helheim glacier near Tasiilaq, Greenland, June 20, 2018. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson SEARCH "JACKSON GREENLAND" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
A large crevasse forms near the calving front of the Helheim glacier near Tasiilaq, Greenland, June 22, 2018. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson SEARCH "JACKSON GREENLAND" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Denise Holland prepares a meal at a science camp on the side of the Helheim glacier near Tasiilaq, Greenland, June 22, 2018. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson SEARCH "JACKSON GREENLAND" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Safety officer Brian Rougeux works to build a semi-permanent structure in a science camp on the side of the Helheim glacier near Tasiilaq, Greenland, June 20, 2018. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson SEARCH "JACKSON GREENLAND" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
Tabular icebergs float in the Sermilik Fjord after a large calving event at the Helheim glacier near Tasiilaq, Greenland, June 23, 2018. REUTERS/Lucas Jackson SEARCH "JACKSON GREENLAND" FOR THIS STORY. SEARCH "WIDER IMAGE" FOR ALL STORIES.
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Researchers at The University of Sydney and the African Climate and Development Initiative at the University of Cape Town in South Africa, as well as Tufts University, also authored the study.

The scope of the problem goes far beyond temperature, the researchers said. Describing climate change solely in terms of global surface temperature does not “capture the breadth of human activities and the real dangers stemming from a warming planet,” the scientists said. “Policymakers and the public now urgently need access to a set of indicators that convey the effects of human activities on GHG emissions and the consequent impacts on climate, our environment, and society.”

To illustrate the true scope of the issue, the declaration included graphic “vital signs” illustrating changes since 1979 that indicate environmental degradation: Lines delineating global tree cover loss, in millions of hectares per year, shoot straight up; Brazilian Amazon forest loss in millions of hectares per year shoots straight down; lines for energy consumption — oil, coal and natural gas — flow in an inexorable upward slope, while solar remains virtually flat. Likewise air traffic, GHG emissions covered by carbon pricing, carbon dioxide emissions, human population and per capita meat production also jet vertically skyward.

“Despite 40 years of global climate negotiations, with few exceptions, we have generally conducted business as usual and have largely failed to address this predicament,” the declaration said. “The climate crisis has arrived and is accelerating faster than most scientists expected. It is more severe than anticipated, threatening natural ecosystems and the fate of humanity. Especially worrisome are potential irreversible climate tipping points and nature’s reinforcing feedbacks (atmospheric, marine, and terrestrial) that could lead to a catastrophic ‘hothouse Earth,’ well beyond the control of humans. These climate chain reactions could cause significant disruptions to ecosystems, society, and economies, potentially making large areas of Earth uninhabitable.”

On the upside, the scientists suggested measures that could mitigate or even reverse some of the worst effects. Replacing fossil fuels with cleaner sources of energy and increasing energy efficiency are necessary first steps, the scientists said. Reducing emissions of short-lived climate pollutants such as methane, soot and hydrofluorocarbons is also doable.

Equally important is preserving, protecting and restoring the planet’s rapidly decaying ecosystems, especially forests, grasslands, peatlands, wetlands and mangroves, the researchers said. When it comes to food, eating more plants and consuming fewer animal products is key, they said.

“The dietary shift would significantly reduce emissions of methane and other greenhouse gases and free up agricultural lands for growing human food rather than livestock feed,” they said in their statement, also alluding to the need to reduce food waste, given that a third of all food produced gets thrown out.

Economically speaking, we must operate carbon-free, shifting goals away from GDP growth and “the pursuit of affluence,” they said. It’s also essential to “curb exploitation of ecosystems” to a sustainable level, they said.

25 PHOTOS
Jane Fonda and Ted Danson arrested during Climate Change Protest
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Jane Fonda and Ted Danson arrested during Climate Change Protest
WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 25: Actor Jane Fonda and Ted Danson speak during "Fire Drill Friday" Climate Change Protest on October 25, 2019 in Washington, DC .Protesters demand Immediate Action for a Green New Deal. Clean renewable energy by 2030, and no new exploration or drilling for Fossil Fuels. (Photo by John Lamparski/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - OCTOBER 25: Actress Jane Fonda is arrested by U.S. Capitol Police along with Ted Danson and other climate activists after blocking 1st Street in front of the Capitol on Friday, Oct. 25, 2019. The weekly Friday protest calls for action on the Green New Deal. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 25: Actor Ted Danson is arrested during the "Fire Drill Friday" Climate Change Protest on October 25, 2019 in Washington, DC . Protesters demand Immediate Action for a Green New Deal. Clean renewable energy by 2030, and no new exploration or drilling for Fossil Fuels. (Photo by John Lamparski/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 25: Actor Jane Fonda speaks during "Fire Drill Friday" Climate Change Protest on October 25, 2019 in Washington, DC .Protesters demand Immediate Action for a Green New Deal. Clean renewable energy by 2030, and no new exploration or drilling for Fossil Fuels. (Photo by John Lamparski/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 25: Actor Jane Fonda speaks during "Fire Drill Friday" Climate Change Protest on October 25, 2019 in Washington, DC .Protesters demand Immediate Action for a Green New Deal. Clean renewable energy by 2030, and no new exploration or drilling for Fossil Fuels. (Photo by John Lamparski/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 25: Actor Ted Danson and Jane Fonda partecipate in "Fire Drill Friday" Climate Change Protest on October 25, 2019 in Washington, DC .Protesters demand Immediate Action for a Green New Deal. Clean renewable energy by 2030, and no new exploration or drilling for Fossil Fuels. (Photo by John Lamparski/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 25: Actress Jane Fonda is arrested during the "Fire Drill Friday" Climate Change Protest on October 25, 2019 in Washington, DC . Protesters demand Immediate Action for a Green New Deal. Clean renewable energy by 2030, and no new exploration or drilling for Fossil Fuels. (Photo by John Lamparski/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 25: Actress Jane Fonda is arrested during the "Fire Drill Friday" Climate Change Protest on October 25, 2019 in Washington, DC . Protesters demand Immediate Action for a Green New Deal. Clean renewable energy by 2030, and no new exploration or drilling for Fossil Fuels. (Photo by John Lamparski/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 25: Actor Jane Fonda speaks during "Fire Drill Friday" Climate Change Protest on October 25, 2019 in Washington, DC .Protesters demand Immediate Action for a Green New Deal. Clean renewable energy by 2030, and no new exploration or drilling for Fossil Fuels. (Photo by John Lamparski/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 25: Actress Jane Fonda is arrested during the "Fire Drill Friday" Climate Change Protest on October 25, 2019 in Washington, DC . Protesters demand Immediate Action for a Green New Deal. Clean renewable energy by 2030, and no new exploration or drilling for Fossil Fuels. (Photo by John Lamparski/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 25: Actress Jane Fonda is arrested during the "Fire Drill Friday" Climate Change Protest on October 25, 2019 in Washington, DC . Protesters demand Immediate Action for a Green New Deal. Clean renewable energy by 2030, and no new exploration or drilling for Fossil Fuels. (Photo by John Lamparski/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 25: Actress Jane Fonda is arrested during the "Fire Drill Friday" Climate Change Protest on October 25, 2019 in Washington, DC . Protesters demand Immediate Action for a Green New Deal. Clean renewable energy by 2030, and no new exploration or drilling for Fossil Fuels. (Photo by John Lamparski/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 25: Actress Jane Fonda is arrested during the "Fire Drill Friday" Climate Change Protest on October 25, 2019 in Washington, DC . Protesters demand Immediate Action for a Green New Deal. Clean renewable energy by 2030, and no new exploration or drilling for Fossil Fuels. (Photo by John Lamparski/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 25: Actor Ted Danson speaks during "Fire Drill Friday" Climate Change Protest on October 25, 2019 in Washington, DC .Protesters demand Immediate Action for a Green New Deal. Clean renewable energy by 2030, and no new exploration or drilling for Fossil Fuels. (Photo by John Lamparski/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 18: Actress Jane Fonda is arrested for blocking a street in front of the U.S. Capitol during a “Fire Drill Fridays” climate change protest and rally on Capitol Hill, October 18, 2019 in Washington, DC. Protesters are demanding urgent action on adapting the Green New Deal, clean, renewable energy, and an end to all new fossil fuel exploration and drilling. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 18: Actress Jane Fonda is arrested for blocking a street in front of the U.S. Capitol during a “Fire Drill Fridays” climate change protest and rally on Capitol Hill, October 18, 2019 in Washington, DC. Protesters are demanding urgent action on adapting the Green New Deal, clean, renewable energy, and an end to all new fossil fuel exploration and drilling. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 18: Actress Jane Fonda is arrested for blocking a street in front of the U.S. Capitol during a “Fire Drill Fridays” climate change protest and rally on Capitol Hill, October 18, 2019 in Washington, DC. Protesters are demanding urgent action on adapting the Green New Deal, clean, renewable energy, and an end to all new fossil fuel exploration and drilling. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 25: Actors Jane Fonda and Ted Danson are arrested during the "Fire Drill Friday" Climate Change Protest on October 25, 2019 in Washington, DC . Protesters demand Immediate Action for a Green New Deal. Clean renewable energy by 2030, and no new exploration or drilling for Fossil Fuels. (Photo by John Lamparski/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 25: Actor Ted Danson is arrested during the "Fire Drill Friday" Climate Change Protest on October 25, 2019 in Washington, DC . Protesters demand Immediate Action for a Green New Deal. Clean renewable energy by 2030, and no new exploration or drilling for Fossil Fuels. (Photo by John Lamparski/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 18: Actress Jane Fonda is arrested for blocking a street in front of the U.S. Capitol during a “Fire Drill Fridays” climate change protest and rally on Capitol Hill, October 18, 2019 in Washington, DC. Protesters are demanding urgent action on adapting the Green New Deal, clean, renewable energy, and an end to all new fossil fuel exploration and drilling. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 18: Actress Jane Fonda participates in a protest in front of the U.S. Capitol during a “Fire Drill Fridays” climate change protest and rally on Capitol Hill, October 18, 2019 in Washington, DC. Protesters are demanding urgent action on adapting the Green New Deal, clean, renewable energy, and an end to all new fossil fuel exploration and drilling. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 25: Actor Ted Danson partecipates in the "Fire Drill Friday" Climate Change Protest on October 25, 2019 in Washington, DC .Protesters demand Immediate Action for a Green New Deal. Clean renewable energy by 2030, and no new exploration or drilling for Fossil Fuels. (Photo by John Lamparski/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 25: Actor Ted Danson demonstrates during "Fire Drill Friday" Climate Change Protest on October 25, 2019 in Washington, DC .Protesters demand Immediate Action for a Green New Deal. Clean renewable energy by 2030, and no new exploration or drilling for Fossil Fuels. (Photo by John Lamparski/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 25: Actors Ted Danson and Jane Fonda demonstrate during "Fire Drill Friday" Climate Change Protest on October 25, 2019 in Washington, DC .Protesters demand Immediate Action for a Green New Deal. Clean renewable energy by 2030, and no new exploration or drilling for Fossil Fuels. (Photo by John Lamparski/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - OCTOBER 25: Actress Jane Fonda is arrested by U.S. Capitol Police along with Ted Danson and other climate activists after blocking 1st Street in front of the Capitol on Friday, Oct. 25, 2019. The weekly Friday protest calls for action on the Green New Deal. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images)
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Lastly, they tackle the issue of population, which must be stabilized with an approach that ensures social and economic justice, they said.

The breadth of specialties of the signatories speaks to the depth and scope of the crisis, Ripple told The Washington Post. They are biologists, ecologists and experts in other fields, the Post noted.

“We’re asking for a transformative change for humanity,” Ripple told The Washington Post. “The situation we’re in today with climate change shows that this is an issue that needs to move beyond climate scientists only.”

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