Maria Butina calls spy charge ‘nonsense’ in interview

Maria Butina, the Russian gun rights activist who became entwined in GOP politics during the 2016 presidential election and pleaded guilty last year to conspiring against the U.S. by acting as unregistered agent of the Kremlin, insisted in a new interview that she was not a spy and never attempted to influence American politics. 

Butina, in an interview with CBS News’ “60 Minutes” ― her first with U.S. media since she was incarcerated in a Florida federal prison — was filmed while the 31-year-old was still behind bars. She was released late last month after serving 15 months of her 18-month sentence and was immediately deported to Russia. Photographs at Moscow’s Sheremetyevo airport showed a beaming Butina clutching a bouquet of flowers, flanked by supporters and her dad. 

Butina, the first Russian national convicted for seeking to influence U.S. politics during the 2016 election, arrived in the U.S. in 2014 to attend conventions hosted by the National Rifle Association. American prosecutors claimed Butina hid her true identity as a Russian agent and attempted to infiltrate the NRA to influence the GOP. 

But Butina, speaking to “60 Minutes” host Leslie Stahl, slammed these accusations as “nonsense.” 

“I never sought to influence your policies. I came here on my own because I wanted to learn from the United States and go back to Russia to make Russia better,” she said in the interview, which aired Sunday.

As Stahl pointed out, Butina was photographed with several prominent Republicans, including Donald Trump Jr., Rick Santorum, Scott Walker and Bobby Jindal. 

But according to Butina, she was merely engaging in “social networking.” 

“Maria is not a spy. She knows of no secret codes,” Butina’s attorney Bob Driscoll told “60 Minutes” in a statement. “There were no safe houses. In other words, she was completely open and there was no espionage.”

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Maria Butina appears in a police booking photograph released by the Alexandria Sheriff's Office in Alexandria, Virginia, U.S. August 18, 2018. Alexandria Sheriff's Office/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY. THIS PICTURE WAS PROCESSED BY REUTERS TO ENHANCE QUALITY. AN UNPROCESSED VERSION HAS BEEN PROVIDED SEPARATELY
This courtroom sketch depicts Maria Butina, a 29-year-old gun-rights activist suspected of being a covert Russian agent, listening to Assistant U.S. Attorney Erik Kenerson as he speaks to Judge Deborah Robinson, left, during a hearing in federal court in Washington, Wednesday, July 18, 2018. Prosecutors say Butina was likely in contact with Kremlin operatives while living in the United States. And prosecutors also are accusing her of using sex and deception to forge influential connections. (Dana Verkouteren via AP)
Mariia Butina, leader of a pro-gun organization, speaks on October 8, 2013 during a press conference in Moscow. - A 29-year-old Russian woman has been arrested for conspiring to influence US politics by cultivating ties with political groups including the National Rifle Association, the powerful gun rights lobby. Mariia Butina, whose name is sometimes spelled Maria, was arrested in Washington on July 15, 2018 and appeared in court on July 16, the Justice Department said. (Photo by STR / AFP) (Photo credit should read STR/AFP/Getty Images)
FILE - In this April 21, 2013 file photo, Maria Butina, leader of a pro-gun organization in Russia, speaks to a crowd during a rally in support of legalizing the possession of handguns in Moscow, Russia. Prosecutors say they have “resolved” a case against Butina accused of being a secret agent for the Russian government, a sign that she likely has taken a plea deal. The information was included in a court filing Monday. (AP Photo/File)
Accused Russian agent Maria Butina is shown sitting at a table with a suspected Russian Intel Operative in a restaurant, according to court documents, in a FBI surveillance photo provided July 18, 2018. FBI/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. PICTURE OBSCURED AT SOURCE.
A note by accused Russian agent Maria Butina, according to court documents, is shown in this photo provided July 18, 2018. U.S. Government Exhibit/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. PICTURE REDACTED AT SOURCE.
US Marshals check their truck as they wait outside the US District Courthouse in Washington, DC on July 18, 2018. - Maria Butina was scheduled to appear at the court on July 18, 2018, to face charges that she sought to 'infiltrate' the US government. According to a federal indictment, Butina's very public activities masked the work of a 'covert Russian agent' with a plan to spearhead Moscow's influence in President Trump's Republican Party. (Photo by Andrew CABALLERO-REYNOLDS / AFP) (Photo credit should read ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP/Getty Images)
A US Marshals van leaves the garage of the Federal Courthouse in Washington, DC on July 18, 2018. - Maria Butina was scheduled to appear at the court on July 18, 2018, to face charges that she sought to 'infiltrate' the US government. According to a federal indictment, Butina's very public activities masked the work of a 'covert Russian agent' with a plan to spearhead Moscow's influence in President Trump's Republican Party. (Photo by Andrew CABALLERO-REYNOLDS / AFP) (Photo credit should read ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP/Getty Images)
Maria Butina, Russian gun rights activist linked to NRA, charged as Kremlin agent. https://t.co/xMMeLvI2UT https://t.co/u3PnALiqx3
Mariia Butina, leader of a pro-gun organization, speaks on October 8, 2013 during a press conference in Moscow. - A 29-year-old Russian woman has been arrested for conspiring to influence US politics by cultivating ties with political groups including the National Rifle Association, the powerful gun rights lobby. Mariia Butina, whose name is sometimes spelled Maria, was arrested in Washington on July 15, 2018 and appeared in court on July 16, the Justice Department said. (Photo by STR / AFP) (Photo credit should read STR/AFP/Getty Images)
Per sources: accused Russian agent Maria Butina was arrested on Sunday because law enforcement feared she was about… https://t.co/0ApzTGcE0z
Russian national Maria Butina has been indicted on two charges, including acting as a foreign agent… https://t.co/Opgf80Mem8
ALEXANDRIA, VA: In this undated handout photo provided by the Alexandria Sheriff's Office, Russian national Maria Butina is seen in a booking photo in Alexandria, Virginia. Butina is awaiting trial on spying charges. (Photo by Alexandria Sheriff's Office via Getty Images)
This courtroom sketch depicts Maria Butina, in orange suit, a 29-year-old gun-rights activist suspected of being a covert Russian agent, listening to her attorney Robert Driscoll, standing, as he speaks to Judge Deborah Robinson, left, during a hearing in federal court in Washington, Wednesday, July 18, 2018. Assistant U.S. Attorney Erik Kenerson, bottom left, and co-defense attorney's Alfred Carry, second from right, and Dansel Plunkett, listen. Prosecutors say Butina was likely in contact with Kremlin operatives while living in the United States. And prosecutors also are accusing her of using sex and deception to forge influential connections. (Dana Verkouteren via AP)
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When questioned about a message she’d sent to Russian official Alexander Torshin ― who Butina has previously admitted to working for ― about allegedly having influence over at least one of President Donald Trump’s Cabinet choices, Butina deflected blame.

“John Bolton will be secretary of state, 90%,” Butina wrote to Torshin in the weeks after Trump was elected. “Ask our people if they’re happy with that. Our opinion will be taken into account.” 

Butina told Stahl that her former boyfriend and Republican operative Paul Erickson had directed her to write that message.

“I hesitated to write that, but I thought it might — you know, it was a certain way to show off to Torshin and say, ‘Well, maybe I have high-level contacts here,’” she said.

Erickson was reportedly a target of federal investigators in the Butina case, but was never charged. He was charged with 11 counts of fraud and money laundering in a separate federal indictment earlier this year related to three of his business ventures. He pleaded not guilty.

John Demers, the assistant attorney general for national security, told Stahl that Butina’s interview with “60 Minutes” ― which the Justice Department recorded and reviewed ― was a “masterpiece of disinformation.” 

“When she was talking to you in your interview, her audience wasn’t the American people. It was Vladimir Putin and all the people in Russia who are going to decide her fate when she goes back there,” Demers said. 

He added: “I have very little doubt that the Russian government will leverage [Butina] as an instrument of propaganda to say: ‘Here was this poor, young, idealistic Russian student and look what happened to her. They threw her in jail for 18 months.’” 

As “60 Minutes” noted, Butina has already spoken with several Russian news outlets since her return to Russia about her ordeal in America, including over 100 days in solitary confinement. 

“I don’t know why they had to be so cruel,” she told Russia’s state-owned media outlet RT of her time in solitary confinement. “I tend to think – this is just conjecture – that maybe they were trying to break my will or something like that, learn some secrets. But I didn’t have any secrets.”

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