After Trent Williams reveals he had cancer, Redskins have a lot of questions to answer

Trent Williams’ holdout and trade request make a lot more sense now that he revealed what happened. And it’s impossible to side with the Washington Redskins.

Williams revealed he had cancer in an interview with Washington media, via JP Finlay of NBC Sports Washington. He said it was a rare tissue cancer DSFP, according to NBC Sports Washington. It started with a growth on his head six years ago, and the team said at that time that the growth was minor.

Williams said when the growth was removed, the cancer was weeks away from reaching his brain.

There had been stories that Williams’ distrust of the Washington medical staff was a big part of his holdout, which ended just this week. It was unusual when Williams didn’t practice Wednesday and it was reported that his helmet didn’t fit comfortably.

Now it all makes sense. It’s a frightening story. And another horrible look for the Redskins.

Trent Williams: ‘There’s no trust’

If you blamed Williams for holding out until after the trade deadline had passed, you might want to rethink that.

Williams wants more guaranteed money. He said in the meeting with the Washington media, via Finlay, that it would be crazy for him to play without guaranteed money on his deal. He also said that seeing Alex Smith suffer a devastating injury affected him. As does his distrust of the medical staff, adding “we haven’t had the best history here with medical stuff,” via Finlay. Smith and running back Derrius Guice dealt with setbacks after surgery due to infections in the past year.

It’s understandable why Williams is wary of the organization.

“There’s no trust,” Williams said, via Finlay.

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Trent Williams throughout his career
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Trent Williams throughout his career
Washington Redskins first-round draft pick Trent Williams laughs during an NFL football news conference at Redskins Park, Friday, April 23, 2010, in Ashburn, Va.(AP Photo/Luis M. Alvarez)
Washington Redskins offensive tackle Trent Wiliams throws the football around at the NFL football team's training camp, Saturday, July 31, 2010, at Redskins Park in Ashburn, Va. (AP Photo/Nick Wass)
Washington Redskins offensive tackle Trent Williams, right, meets with fans after practice at the NFL football team's training camp, Sunday, Aug. 15, 2010, at Redskins Park in Ashburn, Va. (AP Photo/Nick Wass)
Washington Redskins quarterback Rex Grossman (8) scrambles to get away from Jacksonville Jaguars defensive end Larry Hart (59) as Washington Redskins' Trent Williams (71) tries to block during the second half of an NFL football game in Jacksonville, Fla., Sunday, Dec. 26, 2010. Washington won 20-17 in overtime.(AP Photo/John Raoux)
FILE - This Nov. 27, 2011 file photo shows Washington Redskins' Trent Williams celebrating the Redskins' 23-17 win over the Seattle Seahawks in an NFL football game, in Seattle. It's something that's "added to the Redskins drama." That's the reaction Monday, Dec. 5, 2011 from linebacker Lorenzo Alexander to the news that teammates Fred Davis and Trent Williams are expected to be suspended for the rest of the season for violating the NFL's substance abuse policy.(AP Photo/Ted S. Warren, File)
Washington Redskins tight end Fred Davis (83) and offensive tackle Trent Williams (71) horse around as they walk to the team's NFL football training camp practice at Redskins Park, Wednesday, Aug. 1, 2012 in Ashburn, Va. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
Washington Redskins offensive tackle Trent Williams (71), inside linebacker London Fletcher (59), special teamer Lorenzo Alexander (97) and outside linebacker Ryan Kerrigan (91) pose witmodels during NFC team photos at the NFL Football Pro Bowl in Kapolei, Hawaii, Friday, Jan. 25, 2013. (AP Photo/Marco Garcia)
Washington Redskins NFL football offensive tackle Trent Williams speaks to reporters during a news conference at Redskins Park in Ashburn, Va., Wednesday, Jan. 6, 2016. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)
Washington Redskins offensive tackle Trent Williams, 71, who is recovering from an injury, watches his teammates practice as he stands on his own during a training session at Wasps rugby union team training ground in west London, Friday, Oct. 28, 2016. The Washington Redskins are due to play the Cincinnati Bengals at Wembley stadium in London on Sunday in a regular season NFL game. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham)
Washington Redskins offensive tackle Trent Williams (71) jogs to the field during the NFL football team's minicamp at the Redskins Park in Ashburn, Va., Wednesday, June 15, 2016. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)
FILE - In this Oct. 2, 2017, file photo, Washington Redskins offensive tackle Trent Williams (71) is treated during the first half of an NFL football game in Kansas City, Mo. Williams continues to play through a knee injury that will likely require surgery at some point (AP Photo/Reed Hoffmann, File)
FILE - In this Aug. 1, 2018, file photo, Washington Redskins offensive tackle Trent Williams (71) talks with a trainer during the morning session of the Redskins NFL football training camp in Richmond, Va. The first surgery of Trent Williams’ life put more fear into him than any pass-rusher on a football field. “I was scared,” Williams said. “I was terrified.” Not much terrifies the Redskins’ star left tackle, though this was different. Now eight months removed from major surgery on his right knee, Williams is ready to get back on the field when the Redskins open the season at the Arizona Cardinals and already looks like the player he was before the debilitating injury.(AP Photo/Steve Helber, File)
FILE - In this Nov. 11, 2018, file photo, Washington Redskins offensive tackle Trent Williams stands on the sideline during the second half of an NFL football game against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers in Tampa, Fla. A person with knowledge of the situation says Williams has reported to the Redskins, ending his holdout. The person spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity on Tuesday, Oct. 29, 2019, because the team had not announced Williams’ return. He can be kept off the 53-man roster for up to three weeks after reporting.(AP Photo/Phelan M. Ebenhack, File)
NASHVILLE, TN - DECEMBER 22: Trent Williams #71 of the Washington Redskins plays against the Tennessee Titans at Nissan Stadium on December 22, 2018 in Nashville, Tennessee. (Photo by Frederick Breedon/Getty Images)
ASHBURN, VA- DECEMBER 31: Washington Redskins offensive tackle Trent Williams (71) walks through the locker room as the Redskins clean out lockers after last game of season at Redskins Park in Ashburn, VA on December 31, 2018. (Photo by John McDonnell/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
LANDOVER, MD - DECEMBER 30: Washington Redskins offensive tackle Trent Williams (71) looks at the scoreboard as time ticks off the clock during the final minutes of the season against the Philadelphia Eagles at FedEx Field. (Photo by Jonathan Newton / The Washington Post via Getty Images)
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Williams had cancer removed

Williams thought it was a cyst, and when he went to get it removed he found out it was much more serious. Williams said after the initial diagnosis he hadn’t worried about it.

“I was told it was something minor, so I didn't really question it,” Williams said, via NBC Sports Washington. "The lump continued to grow over the years, and it was concerning. But there was no pain involved.

"If I'm getting told by various people who I put my career in the hands of telling me that I'm fine, then I'm fine. That's how I looked at it."

Williams said in the two weeks he was in a Chicago hospital for surgery, none of his teammates visited him.

Williams said he didn’t blame Daniel Snyder, the team’s owner. But this latest story is another bad look for a Redskins franchise that has had its share of negative stories lately.

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Frank Schwab is a writer for Yahoo Sports. Have a tip? Email him at shutdown.corner@yahoo.com or follow him on Twitter! Follow @YahooSchwab

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