FBI tests find no evidence of wrongdoing in Dominican deaths

WASHINGTON (AP) — The State Department says FBI toxicology reports on the mysterious deaths of U.S. tourists in the Dominican Republic showed no evidence inconsistent with the island nation's findings of natural causes.

The department says "the results of the additional, extensive toxicology testing completed to date have been consistent with the findings of local authorities." The department says that families have been informed of the results.

The first deaths to make headlines were in May, when a couple seemingly died at the same time in the same hotel room.

The Dominican Republic's tourism minister said in June that the deaths were not part of any mysterious series of fatalities but were a statistically normal phenomenon being lumped together by the U.S. media.

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Scenes from the Dominican Republic
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Scenes from the Dominican Republic
In this April 5, 2017 photo, a bath tub stands in one of the rooms inside the Casa del Diseñador, part of the Casas del XVI boutique hotel in the Colonial Zone of Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic. According to government statistics, only 15 percent of visitors to the Dominican Republic spent time in Santo Domingo and only 3 percent slept there, drawn away by all-included packages at beach resorts and dissuaded by the lack of high-quality lodging inside Santo Domingo's walled city. (AP Photo/Tatiana Fernandez)
In this April 5, 2017 photo, a baseball player exercises while employees from the Ministry of Environment clean up the Fray Anton de Montesinos beach in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic. According to government statistics, only 15 percent of visitors to the Dominican Republic spent time in Santo Domingo and only 3 percent slept there, drawn away by all-included packages at beach resorts and dissuaded by the lack of high-quality lodging inside Santo Domingo's walled city. (AP Photo/Tatiana Fernandez)
A man walks away from Los Yayales beach after watching the sea surge due to the approach of Hurricane Irene to Nagua, in the northern coast of the Dominican Republic, Monday, Aug, 22, 2011. A strengthening Category 2 Hurricane Irene roared off the Dominican Republic's resort-dotted northern coast on Monday night, whipping up high waves and torrential downpours on a track that could slam it into the U.S. Southeast as a major storm by the end of the week. (AP Photo/Roberto Guzman)
Paralyzed constructions are seen at the Cap Cana Resort in Punta Cana, Dominican Republic, Tuesday, Nov. 18, 2008. The global financial crisis has halted work on this multimillion dollar project overlooking a turquoise sea, turning it into a ghost resort. It is among growing signs that the Caribbean is headed for tough times as construction workers and resort employees are laid off by the hundreds and anticipated peak season bookings are at a trickle. (AP Photo/Kena Betancur)
A view of the stalled construction of the Punta Palmera Condominium at the Cap Cana Resort in Punta Cana, Dominican Republic, Saturday, Nov. 15, 2008. The global financial crisis has halted work on this multimillion dollar project overlooking a turquoise sea, turning it into a ghost resort. It is among growing signs that the Caribbean is headed for tough times as construction workers and resort employees are laid off by the hundreds and anticipated peak season bookings are at a trickle. (AP Photo/Kena Betancur)
Tourists sunbathe in the Bahia Tortuga Resort in Punta Cana, Dominican Republic, Monday, Nov. 17, 2008. The global financial crisis has halted work on this multimillion dollar project overlooking a turquoise sea, turning it into a ghost resort. It is among growing signs that the Caribbean is headed for tough times as construction workers and resort employees are laid off by the hundreds and anticipated peak season bookings are at a trickle. (AP Photo/Kena Betancur)
The sun sets over the Cap Cana Resort in Punta Cana, Dominican Republic, Friday, Nov. 14, 2008. The global financial crisis has halted work on this multimillion dollar project overlooking a turquoise sea, turning it into a ghost resort. It is among growing signs that the Caribbean is headed for tough times as construction workers and resort employees are laid off by the hundreds and anticipated peak season bookings are at a trickle. (AP Photo/Kena Betancur)
** FOR USE WITH AP WEEKLY FEATURES ** American tourists sunbathe at the Casa de Campo resort in La Romana on Friday, June 2, 2006. Smooth skin with a summer glow can best be achieved by preparing the skin early. (AP Photo/Alexandre Meneghini)
PUNTA CANA, DOMINICAN REPUBLIC - JUNE 21: A sign is seen for down town Punta Cana as authorities continue to investigate the unexpected deaths of tourists in some of the area resorts on June 21, 2019 in Punta Cana, Dominican Republic. According to news reports and the United States State Department, seven Americans have become ill and died this year and two more families are reported to have come forward saying their relatives died unexpectedly last year while staying at resorts in the Dominican Republic. The FBI is assisting the Dominican authorities in the investigation into why tourists are dying. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
LA ROMANA, DOMINICAN REPUBLIC - JUNE 21: A sign is seen near the entrance to the Grand Bahia Principe La Romana on June 21, 2019 in La Romana, Dominican Republic. According to reports three American guests have died unexpectedly while visiting the resort. According to news reports and the United States State Department, seven Americans have become ill and died this year and two more families are reported to have come forward saying their relatives died unexpectedly last year while staying at resorts in the Dominican Republic. The FBI is assisting the Dominican authorities in the investigation into why tourists are dying. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
LA ROMANA, DOMINICAN REPUBLIC - JUNE 21: The beach area that abuts the Grand Bahia Principe La Romana is seen on June 21, 2019 in La Romana, Dominican Republic. According to reports, three American guests have died unexpectedly while visiting the resort. According to news reports and the United States State Department, seven Americans have become ill and died this year and two more families are reported to have come forward saying their relatives died unexpectedly last year while staying at resorts in the Dominican Republic. The FBI is assisting the Dominican authorities in the investigation into why tourists are dying. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
PUNTA CANA, DOMINICAN REPUBLIC - JUNE 21: The entrance to the Bahia Principe resort is seen on June 21, 2019 in Punta Cana, Dominican Republic. The resort is where, according to family members, a tourist died unexpectedly after getting sick. According to news reports and the United States State Department, seven Americans have become ill and died this year and two more families are reported to have come forward saying their relatives died unexpectedly last year while staying at resorts in the Dominican Republic. The FBI is assisting the Dominican authorities in the investigation into why tourists are dying. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
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