US: Soldier talked of killing activists, bombing network

WASHINGTON (AP) — Prosecutors say a U.S. Army soldier shared bomb-making instructions online and also discussed killing activists and bombing a news network.

The Justice Department says Monday that Jarrett William Smith was charged with distributing information related to explosives and weapons of mass destruction. The 24-year-old was stationed at Fort Riley in Kansas.

Prosecutors say Smith discussed his plan to kill far-left-leaning "antifa" activists and described how to build a bomb that could be triggered by calling a cell phone. They say he also said on Facebook that he was interested in traveling to Ukraine to fight with a paramilitary group known as Azov Batallion.

Related: World War II 'bouncing bombs' recovered Loch Striven

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World War II 'bouncing bombs' recovered Loch Striven
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World War II 'bouncing bombs' recovered Loch Striven

British Sub-Aqua Club divers a Highball bouncing bomb recovered yesterday from Loch Striven on July 19, 2017 in Loch Striven,Scotland. More than two hundred of the spherical bombs were tested on the Loch on the Glenstriven Estate on the Argyll peninsula during World War Two. Highball was the military codename for the weapons, a naval version of the 'Upkeep' bouncing bombs used in the Dambusters raid in May 1943.

(Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)

Divers from the Royal Navy and the British Sub-Aqua Club are recovering two Highball bouncing bombs from Loch Striven on July 19, 2017 in Loch Striven,Scotland. More than two hundred of the spherical bombs were tested on the Loch on the Glenstriven Estate on the Argyll peninsula during World War Two. Highball was the military codename for the weapons, a naval version of the 'Upkeep' bouncing bombs used in the Dambusters raid in May 1943.

(Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)

Divers from the Royal Navy and the British Sub-Aqua Club are recovering two Highball bouncing bombs from Loch Striven on July 19, 2017 in Loch Striven,Scotland. More than two hundred of the spherical bombs were tested on the Loch on the Glenstriven Estate on the Argyll peninsula during World War Two. Highball was the military codename for the weapons, a naval version of the 'Upkeep' bouncing bombs used in the Dambusters raid in May 1943.

(Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)

Divers from the Royal Navy and the British Sub-Aqua Club are recovering two Highball bouncing bombs from Loch Striven on July 19, 2017 in Loch Striven,Scotland. More than two hundred of the spherical bombs were tested on the Loch on the Glenstriven Estate on the Argyll peninsula during World War Two. Highball was the military codename for the weapons, a naval version of the 'Upkeep' bouncing bombs used in the Dambusters raid in May 1943.

(Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)

Divers from the Royal Navy and the British Sub-Aqua Club are recovering two Highball bouncing bombs from Loch Striven on July 19, 2017 in Loch Striven,Scotland. More than two hundred of the spherical bombs were tested on the Loch on the Glenstriven Estate on the Argyll peninsula during World War Two. Highball was the military codename for the weapons, a naval version of the 'Upkeep' bouncing bombs used in the Dambusters raid in May 1943.

(Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)

Divers from the Royal Navy and the British Sub-Aqua Club are recovering two Highball bouncing bombs from Loch Striven on July 19, 2017 in Loch Striven,Scotland. More than two hundred of the spherical bombs were tested on the Loch on the Glenstriven Estate on the Argyll peninsula during World War Two. Highball was the military codename for the weapons, a naval version of the 'Upkeep' bouncing bombs used in the Dambusters raid in May 1943.

(Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)

Divers from the Royal Navy and the British Sub-Aqua Club are recovering two Highball bouncing bombs from Loch Striven on July 19, 2017 in Loch Striven,Scotland. More than two hundred of the spherical bombs were tested on the Loch on the Glenstriven Estate on the Argyll peninsula during World War Two. Highball was the military codename for the weapons, a naval version of the 'Upkeep' bouncing bombs used in the Dambusters raid in May 1943.

(Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)

British Sub-Aqua Club divers a Highball bouncing bomb recovered yesterday from Loch Striven on July 19, 2017 in Loch Striven,Scotland. More than two hundred of the spherical bombs were tested on the Loch on the Glenstriven Estate on the Argyll peninsula during World War Two. Highball was the military codename for the weapons, a naval version of the 'Upkeep' bouncing bombs used in the Dambusters raid in May 1943.

(Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)

Divers from the Royal Navy and the British Sub-Aqua Club are recovering two Highball bouncing bombs from Loch Striven on July 19, 2017 in Loch Striven,Scotland. More than two hundred of the spherical bombs were tested on the Loch on the Glenstriven Estate on the Argyll peninsula during World War Two. Highball was the military codename for the weapons, a naval version of the 'Upkeep' bouncing bombs used in the Dambusters raid in May 1943.

(Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)

British Sub-Aqua Club divers a Highball bouncing bomb recovered yesterday from Loch Striven on July 19, 2017 in Loch Striven,Scotland. More than two hundred of the spherical bombs were tested on the Loch on the Glenstriven Estate on the Argyll peninsula during World War Two. Highball was the military codename for the weapons, a naval version of the 'Upkeep' bouncing bombs used in the Dambusters raid in May 1943.

(Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)

British Sub-Aqua Club divers a Highball bouncing bomb recovered yesterday from Loch Striven on July 19, 2017 in Loch Striven,Scotland. More than two hundred of the spherical bombs were tested on the Loch on the Glenstriven Estate on the Argyll peninsula during World War Two. Highball was the military codename for the weapons, a naval version of the 'Upkeep' bouncing bombs used in the Dambusters raid in May 1943.

(Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)

British Sub-Aqua Club divers a Highball bouncing bomb recovered yesterday from Loch Striven on July 19, 2017 in Loch Striven,Scotland. More than two hundred of the spherical bombs were tested on the Loch on the Glenstriven Estate on the Argyll peninsula during World War Two. Highball was the military codename for the weapons, a naval version of the 'Upkeep' bouncing bombs used in the Dambusters raid in May 1943.

(Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)

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Court papers say Smith also suggested targeting a major news network with a car bomb. The news network was not identified.

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