Puerto Rico to close schools as TS Karen threatens flooding

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico (AP) — Puerto Rico is canceling classes and closing public agencies as Tropical Storm Karen approaches the U.S. territory and threatens to unleash heavy flooding in the island's eastern region.

Gov. Wanda Vázquez said Monday that she has activated the National Guard and she urged people in flood-prone areas to seek shelter.

Karen was located 195 miles (310 kilometers) south of St. Croix and moving north-northwest at 12 mph (19 kph) near midday Monday with maximum sustained winds of 40 mph (65 kph). The storm is expected to hit Puerto Rico Tuesday morning.

Related: Puerto Rico braces for Hurricane Season

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Puerto Rico braces for Hurricane Season
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Puerto Rico braces for Hurricane Season
Jose Alvarez, 60, uses a head lamp while walking in the dark as the island's fragile power system is still reeling from the devastation wrought by Hurricane Maria eight months ago, in Jayuya, Puerto Rico May 10, 2018. Picture taken May 10, 2018. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
A horse eats from the hand of a young man while being illuminated by a flashlight as the island's fragile power system is still reeling from the devastation wrought by Hurricane Maria eight months ago, in Adjuntas, Puerto Rico May 12, 2018. Picture taken May 12, 2018. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
Cancer patient Israel Gonzalez, 84, poses for a photograph with the light of a solar lamp at his home as the island's fragile power system is still reeling from the devastation wrought by Hurricane Maria eight months ago, in Utuado, Puerto Rico May 11, 2018. Picture taken May 11, 2018. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
Residents of La Chorrera neighbourhood carry an electricity pole as the island's fragile power system is still reeling from the devastation wrought by Hurricane Maria eight months ago, in Utuado, Puerto Rico May 11, 2018. Picture taken May 11, 2018. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
Residents of La Central neighbourhood wash clothes in the river as the island is still reeling from the devastation wrought by Hurricane Maria eight months ago, in Adjuntas, Puerto Rico May 13, 2018. Picture taken May 13, 2018. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
Contractors of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers install an electricity pole as the island's fragile power system is still reeling from the devastation wrought by Hurricane Maria eight months ago, in Utuado, Puerto Rico May 17, 2018. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
Jannet Rodriguez, 40, stands on the porch of her house with solar lamps attached to the railings, as the island's fragile power system is still reeling from the devastation wrought by Hurricane Maria eight months ago, in Adjuntas, Puerto Rico May 11, 2018. Picture taken May 11, 2018. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
A house illuminated with the help of a generator is seen in the dark as the island's fragile power system is still reeling from the devastation wrought by Hurricane Maria eight months ago, in Jayuya, Puerto Rico May 10, 2018. Picture taken May 10, 2018. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
Food is seen on a kitchen counter in a house without electricity, as the island's fragile power system is still reeling from the devastation wrought by Hurricane Maria eight months ago, in Adjuntas, Puerto Rico May 11, 2018. Picture taken May 11, 2018. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
The license plate of a jeep of Puerto Rico's Electric Power Authority (PREPA) reads "Puerto Rico, Island of Enchantment" as the island's fragile power system is still reeling from the devastation wrought by Hurricane Maria eight months ago, in Utuado, Puerto Rico May 16, 2018. Picture taken May 16, 2018. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
A cat sits next to a generator in a house without electricity as the island's fragile power system is still reeling from the devastation wrought by Hurricane Maria eight months ago, in Adjuntas, Puerto Rico May 12, 2018. Picture taken May 12 , 2018. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
Workers of Puerto Rico's Electric Power Authority (PREPA) repair part of the electrical grid as the island's fragile power system is still reeling from the devastation wrought by Hurricane Maria eight months ago, in Utuado, Puerto Rico May 17, 2018. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
Wilson Reyes, 44, uses a solar lamp while walking in the dark as the island's fragile power system is still reeling from the devastation wrought by Hurricane Maria eight months ago, in Jayuya, Puerto Rico May 11, 2018. Picture taken May 11, 2018. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
Alexis Massol sits in a cinema that uses solar energy, as the island's fragile power system is still reeling from the devastation wrought by Hurricane Maria eight months ago, in Adjuntas, Puerto Rico May 11, 2018. The writing on the screen reads "Bankruptcy." Picture taken May 11, 2018. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
Jannet Rodriguez (R), 44, uses a solar lamp while talking to her daughter Keimiliz, as the island's fragile power system is still reeling from the devastation wrought by Hurricane Maria eight months ago, in Jayuya, Puerto Rico May 11, 2018. Picture taken May 11, 2018. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
A house illuminated with the help of a generator is seen in the dark as the island's fragile power system is still reeling from the devastation wrought by Hurricane Maria eight months ago, in Adjuntas, Puerto Rico May 11, 2018. Picture taken May 11, 2018. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
Gladys Lugo, 67, sits in a wheelchair as a solar lamp illuminates the entrance of her home as the island's fragile power system is still reeling from the devastation wrought by Hurricane Maria eight months ago, in Jayuya, Puerto Rico May 10, 2018. Picture taken May 10, 2018. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
A cat sits next to electrical cables connected to a generator, as the island's fragile power system is still reeling from the devastation wrought by Hurricane Maria eight months ago, in Utuado, Puerto Rico May 13, 2018. Picture taken May 13, 2018. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
A resident of La Chorrera neighbourhood tries to fix an electrical grid as the island's fragile power system is still reeling from the devastation wrought by Hurricane Maria eight months ago, in Utuado, Puerto Rico May 11, 2018. Picture taken May 11, 2018. REUTERS/Alvin Baez
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Forecasters say 2 to 4 inches (5-10 centimeters) of rain is expected with up to 8 inches (20 centimeters) in isolated areas.

A tropical storm warning also is in effect for the U.S. and British Virgin Islands.

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