High school player collapses, dies in twin brother's arms: 'I'm about to pass out'

A Texas high school is struggling to come to terms with the death of a 16-year-old football player after he suddenly collapsed last Friday and died in his twin brother's arms, KXAS reports. 

Deshaud Williams, a sophomore who played defensive tackle at Lewisville High School, died last week after running and playing tag at a parking lot with his brother Dashaud. 

"We started jogging a little bit more, and he was like, 'Da, I can’t breathe,'" Dashaud recalled. "I was like, 'You good? Come on, we're going to get home.' And he was like, 'I can't breathe. I'm about to pass out.' And I ran to him, and he fell to his knees and fell on his back."

Dashaud told the station that he then called 911 and stayed with his brother until an ambulance came. The football player's family said that he had gotten a physical exam during the school year and appeared fine.

"Yes, a big mystery," said his mother, Razel Sheppard. "He's never been sick. He was a healthy all-around kid. Hopefully (we'll) get answers."

The family said they are still waiting for results of Deshaud's autopsy but suspect he may have died of cardiac arrest. On Sunday, they, along with his friends from school, came together at a local park to remember him.

"His heart couldn't take no more, and he died in his brother's hands," Sheppard tearfully told KXAS. "I appreciate everyone coming out here."

Since the 16-year-old's death, his relatives have set up a GoFundMe to cover his funeral expenses. As of Monday, it has raised more than $6,000 of its $5,000 goal.

"We appreciate the monetary support and ask that you please keep our family in your prayers during this challenging time," the fundraiser's page reads. "Deshaud leaves behind his mother (Razel Sheppard), older brother (Dameon Stewart), twin brother (Dashaud Williams), father (Prentice Williams), step-mother (Ms. Ceni), little sister (Jada William), and little brother (Jayce William). He also leaves behind a host of cousins, aunties, uncles, grandparents and great-great-grandparent."

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