University of Florida student accused of sexual assault deemed 'high achieving' by judge

A college student who was being held in jail on sexual assault charges has been released on his own recognizance after a judge deemed him "high achieving."

Ian Milaski, a senior at the University of Florida, was released Friday after an appeal to reduce his $125,000 bond was granted, according to WCJB-TV

The 21-year-old was arrested late last month after a female student told campus police that Milaski had tried to assault her on Aug. 25. The victim, identified as a sophomore at the university, said Milaski called her and asked her to bring him water because he was drunk. 

She then walked Milaski, who is a resident hall assistant, back to his dorm room, where he continuously tried to kiss her — eventually grabbing her by the wrists and saying, "I want to sleep with you." When the victim tried to leave, Milaski grabbed her, pinned her to his bed and began sticking his fingers into her underwear. 

The woman eventually escaped, but later woke up in the middle of the night to find Milaski lying in her bed next to her. A friend who overheard the commotion reportedly scared him off. 

After his arrest, Milaski was charged with battery and false imprisonment, and was being held in jail as he awaited trial. He then submitted a motion to reduce his bond, with his attorney claiming the incident was a "misunderstanding among platonic friends fueled by alcohol."

The motion noted Milaski's status as a leader on campus, including his role as a teaching assistant and the fact that he had served 210 hours of community service over the past two years. The lawyer added that his client was a "high-achieving student" who needed to be released in order to focus on his studies.

The judge approved Milaski's motion, ordering him to avoid any contact with the victim and banning him from returning to areas near the university — except for classes and school-related events. He is also required to wear a GPS tracker while he awaits his court date, which has not yet been set. 

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.