More remains found of FDNY firefighter killed on 9/11

A second wake and memorial service were set for an FDNY firefighter killed on 9/11 after the medical examiner recently identified additional Ground Zero remains as belonging to the hero victim, authorities confirmed Thursday.

The event once again honoring Firefighter Michael Haub, 34, was set for Sept. 10 — one day before the 18th anniversary of his death inside the south tower of the World Trade Center. Haub will be remembered again at the Krauss Funeral Home in Franklin Square, L.I., where Mayor Bloomberg and FDNY Commissioner Nicholas Scoppetta were among the mourners at his March 2002 wake.

The city Medical Examiner’s office confirmed Thursday that it was recently able to identify additional remains found at the site as belonging to Haub. Back in March 2002, about six months after his death, the ME previously identified remains recovered from the trade center ruins.

Haub, who was on the job for two years on Sept. 11, 2001, had long aspired to joining the FDNY, starting his time as a probationary firefight at age 31. He was one of eight members of Ladder Co. 4 killed after responding to the Twin Towers from their Midtown firehouse just north of Times Square.

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Fire Department of New York (FDNY) personnel work on the scene of an apartment fire in Bronx, New York, U.S., December 29, 2017. REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz
Fire Department of New York (FDNY) personnel work on the scene of an apartment fire in Bronx, New York, U.S., December 29, 2017. REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz
Fire Department of New York (FDNY) personnel work on the scene of an apartment fire in Bronx, New York, U.S. December 28, 2017. REUTERS/Amr Alfiky TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
NEW YORK, NY - JANUARY 02: A firefighter rolls up hose after fighting a 7-alarm fire in the Bronx on January 2, 2018 in New York City. The fire, which started around 5:30 a.m. on a frigid Tuesday, is believed to have started on a first-floor furniture store before overtaking the entire building. There were numerous injuries reported from the morning fire which took over 200 firefighters to control. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
A Fire Department of New York member exits the scene of an apartment fire on December 29, 2017 in the Bronx borough of New York City. Officials said Friday that the death toll from the fire has reached 12, including four children. / AFP PHOTO / KENA BETANCUR (Photo credit should read KENA BETANCUR/AFP/Getty Images)
NEW YORK ? JULY 22: Member of the New York City Fire Department before the Chicago Fire v New York City FC match at Yankee Stadium on July 22, 2017 in New York City. New York City FC defeats Chicago Fire 2-1. (Photo by Michael Stewart/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - JUNE 13: New York City Fire Department (FDNY) officers look on during an evacuation of 32 residents after a building in the Tribeca neighborhood was found to have elevated levels of carbon monoxide on June 13, 2017 in New York, United States. (Photo by Vanessa Carvalho/Brazil Photo Press/LatinContent/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - JUNE 13: New York City Fire Department (FDNY) officers walk during an evacuation of 32 residents after a building in the Tribeca neighborhood was found to have elevated levels of carbon monoxide on June 13, 2017 in New York, United States. (Photo by Vanessa Carvalho/Brazil Photo Press/LatinContent/Getty Images)
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Haub previously served as the chief of the Roslyn Heights Highlands volunteer fire department before receiving a letter from the FDNY about joining the ranks of city firefighters.

He left behind two children, a son Michael and a daughter Kiersten – who first said the word “Dada” on Sept. 11, 2001.

In July, the city Medical Examiner identified its 1,644th victim of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. The woman’s name was withheld at the request of her family after DNA testing of remains from 2002 positively identified her. One month earlier, the remains of a man whose name was also kept under wraps were positively identified as well.

At this point, 1,109 victims — roughly 40% of the 2,753 people reported missing after two hijacked planes slammed into the Twin Towers — remain unidentified.

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