Montana hotel employees find black bear relaxing in women's bathroom

Employees at Montana hotel were shocked to find an unregistered guest hiding in their bathroom recently. The visitor? A young black bear.

Video shared by Buck's T-4 Lodge & Restaurant shows the entire incident, which began when the hotel's staff found the animal resting on top of a sink in the women's restroom. 

The hotel, located in Big Sky near Yellowstone National Park, is no stranger to wildlife, but general manager David O’Conner told Fox News that a “bear stuck in the bathroom” was definitely a first. 

"We had a surprise visitor last night in the hotel lobby," the hotel's Facebook post sharing the video said. "A yearling black bear found its way through a window into the ladies' room."

The bear apparently got into the bathroom through an open window. Employees first noticed something was wrong when they heard a commotion in the lobby, ultimately finding the animal lounging in the bathroom. 

"The bear wasn't able to get himself back out as the window was too high, but he was real comfortable there. He just hung out on the counter where it was cool, and literally went to sleep," O’Conner told CNN.

O'Conner said the bear was completely unwilling to move, so he and his staff called the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks for help. The agency, along with local police, managed to tranquilize the animal and safely remove it.

The video, which has been shared more than 1,000 times on Facebook, shows guests crowding the lobby as the bear is taken out, recording videos and snagging photos. 

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The cute critters of the Appalachian Bear Rescue
(Photo credit: Appalachian Bear Rescue)
(Photo credit: Appalachian Bear Rescue)
(Photo credit: Appalachian Bear Rescue)
(Photo credit: Appalachian Bear Rescue)
(Photo credit: Appalachian Bear Rescue)
(Photo credit: Appalachian Bear Rescue)
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"For a lot of guests, this will be the closest they get to a bear and it might be the only time they see one," O'Conner told Fox News. 

The Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks said in a post last month that it had received "numerous reports of bear activity across the region" recently, warning that people should be especially cautious during the fall season. 

"With the arrival of autumn, bears are increasingly active and searching for food sources, and Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks is reminding the public to secure food attractants and 'Be Bear Aware.'"

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