San Francisco adopting new language for criminals, 'convicted felon' now will be called a 'justice-involved person'

The city of San Francisco is trying to change the public’s perception of criminals by introducing new language to refer to someone who committed a crime. 

The Board of Supervisors put the changes in place in July.

So, from now on, according to Fox News, a “convicted felon” will be referred to as a “justice-involved person.”

The San Francisco Chronicle reports that a criminal released from custody will be called a “formerly incarcerated person” or a “returning resident.” 

Supervisor Matt Haney told the paper quote, “We don’t want people to be forever labeled for the worst things that they have done. We want them, ultimately to become contributing citizens, and referring to them as felons is like a scarlet letter that they can never get away from.” 

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San Francisco battles electric scooter rentals
A City of San Francisco Public Works employee loads a Neutron Holdings Inc. LimeBike shared electric scooter onto the back of a truck in San Francisco, California, U.S., on Wednesday, May 2, 2018. City officials, eager to do something about the electric scooters issue, are sending cease-and-desist letters and are planning to require permits soon, while impounding any that they say are parked illegally. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
SAN FRANCISCO, CA - APRIL 17: A user rides a Spin scooter on April 17, 2018 in San Francisco, California. Three weeks after three companies started placing electric scooters on the streets for rental, San Francisco City Attorney Dennis Herrera issued cease-and-desist notice to electric scooter rental companies Bird, LimeBike and Spin. The notice comes as the San Francisco board of supervisors considers a proposed ordinance to regulate the scooters to keep people from riding them on sidewalks, parking them in the middle of sidewalks and requiring riders to wear helmets and have a drivers license. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
A person unlocks a Neutron Holdings Inc. LimeBike shared electric scooter using a smartphone in San Francisco, California, U.S., on Thursday, May 3, 2018. City officials, eager to do something about the electric scooters issue, are sending cease-and-desist letters and are planning to require permits soon, while impounding any that they say are parked illegally. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A City of San Francisco Public Works employee pushes a Neutron Holdings Inc. LimeBike shared electric scooter across Market Street in San Francisco, California, U.S., on Wednesday, May 2, 2018. City officials, eager to do something about the electric scooters issue, are sending cease-and-desist letters and are planning to require permits soon, while impounding any that they say are parked illegally. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A person uses a smartphone to unlock Neutron Holdings Inc. LimeBike shared electric scooter on the Embarcadero in San Francisco, California, U.S., on Thursday, May 3, 2018. City officials, eager to do something about the electric scooters issue, are sending cease-and-desist letters and are planning to require permits soon, while impounding any that they say are parked illegally. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A pedestrian pushes a shopping cart past a Neutron Holdings Inc. LimeBike shared electric scooter in San Francisco, California, U.S., on Thursday, May 3, 2018. City officials, eager to do something about the electric scooters issue, are sending cease-and-desist letters and are planning to require permits soon, while impounding any that they say are parked illegally. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A City of San Francisco Public Works employee pushes a Neutron Holdings Inc. LimeBike shared electric scooter on Market Street in San Francisco, California, U.S., on Wednesday, May 2, 2018. City officials, eager to do something about the electric scooters issue, are sending cease-and-desist letters and are planning to require permits soon, while impounding any that they say are parked illegally. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
People ride Neutron Holdings Inc. LimeBike shared electric scooters on the Embarcadero in San Francisco, California, U.S., on Thursday, May 3, 2018. City officials, eager to do something about the electric scooters issue, are sending cease-and-desist letters and are planning to require permits soon, while impounding any that they say are parked illegally. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
People ride Bird Rides Inc. shared electric scooters past a trolley on the Embarcadero in San Francisco, California, U.S., on Thursday, May 3, 2018. City officials, eager to do something about the electric scooters issue, are sending cease-and-desist letters and are planning to require permits soon, while impounding any that they say are parked illegally. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
People use a smartphone to unlock Neutron Holdings Inc. LimeBike shared electric scooters on the Embarcadero in San Francisco, California, U.S., on Thursday, May 3, 2018. City officials, eager to do something about the electric scooters issue, are sending cease-and-desist letters and are planning to require permits soon, while impounding any that they say are parked illegally. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A person rides a Bird Rides Inc. shared electric scooter in San Francisco, California, U.S., on Thursday, May 3, 2018. City officials, eager to do something about the electric scooters issue, are sending cease-and-desist letters and are planning to require permits soon, while impounding any that they say are parked illegally. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
SAN FRANCISCO, CA - APRIL 17: A user rides a Bird scooter on April 17, 2018 in San Francisco, California. Three weeks after three companies started placing electric scooters on the streets for rental, San Francisco City Attorney Dennis Herrera issued cease-and-desist notice to electric scooter rental companies Bird, LimeBike and Spin. The notice comes as the San Francisco board of supervisors considers a proposed ordinance to regulate the scooters to keep people from riding them on sidewalks, parking them in the middle of sidewalks and requiring riders to wear helmets and have a drivers license. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
SAN FRANCISCO, CA - APRIL 17: A Bird scooter sits parked on a street corner on April 17, 2018 in San Francisco, California. Three weeks after three companies started placing electric scooters on the streets for rental, San Francisco City Attorney Dennis Herrera issued cease-and-desist notice to electric scooter rental companies Bird, LimeBike and Spin. The notice comes as the San Francisco board of supervisors considers a proposed ordinance to regulate the scooters to keep people from riding them on sidewalks, parking them in the middle of sidewalks and requiring riders to wear helmets and have a drivers license. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)
A City of San Francisco Public Works employee carries a a Bird Rides Inc. shared electric scooter in San Francisco, California, U.S., on Wednesday, May 2, 2018. City officials, eager to do something about the electric scooters issue, are sending cease-and-desist letters and are planning to require permits soon, while impounding any that they say are parked illegally. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
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Now, according to Fox News, crime in the city has gone up seeing one of the highest crime rates in the country. 

The new language hasn’t yet been endorsed by the Mayor. 

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