A Detroit man dies in Iraq after being deported in Trump's immigration enforcement efforts

  • Jimmy Aldaoud, a 41-year-old man from Detroit, was found dead on Tuesday in Iraq after being deported in the midst of the Trump administration's escalated immigration enforcement efforts, according to a Politico report.
  • Aldaoud was an Iraqi national and Chaldean Catholic, but he was born in Greece and came to the US as a child.
  • "Rest In Peace Jimmy," Edward Bajoka, an immigration attorney, wrote in a Facebook post. "Your blood is on the hands of ICE and this administration."

A 41-year-old man from Detroit was found dead Tuesday in Iraq after being deported in the midst of escalated immigration enforcement efforts called by the Trump administration.

Jimmy Aldaoud was an Iraqi national and Chaldean Catholic, but he was born in Greece and came to the US as a child, Politico reported. He had never been to Iraq and didn't speak Arabic.

Edward Bajoka, an immigration attorney who was close to Aldaoud's family, said in a Facebook post that Aldaoud was diabetic man and likely died because he could not get needed insulin.

"Rest In Peace Jimmy," Bajoka wrote. "Your blood is on the hands of ICE and this administration."

Bajoka also wrote that Aldaoud was a paranoid schizophrenic and "mental health was the primary reason for his legal issues that led to his deportation."

In a video shared on Facebook, Aldaoud said he had been throwing up and sleeping on the streets. He also said that he's been in the US since he was six months old and that he "begged" immigration officials to not deport him.

"Immigration agents pulled me over and said I'm going to Iraq," he said in the undated video. "I said, 'I've never been there. I've been in this country my whole life, since pretty much birth.'"

Representatives from ICE and the White House did not immediately respond to emails from INSIDER.

According to Politico, the Trump administration targeted more than 1,000 Iraqis with final orders of removal, including Chaldean Catholics, a branch of the Roman Catholic church that traces back to ancient Mesopotamia in present-day Iraq.

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Migrants trekking to the United States rely on faith

Pastor Jose Murcia, 47, preaches to migrants, part of a caravan of thousands from Central America traveling to the U.S., outside a temporary shelter in Tijuana, Mexico November 24, 2018.

(REUTERS/Alkis Konstantinidis)

Nicolas Alonso Sanchez, 47, from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands of migrants from Central America traveling to the U.S., poses for a picture as he holds a cross at a temporary shelter in Tijuana, Mexico November 24, 2018. "God helped me and gave me the strength, helped me to make my dreams come true. God gave me all the strength to get all the way here," Sanchez said. 

(REUTERS/Alkis Konstantinidis)

Migrants, part of a caravan of thousands from Central America traveling to the U.S., pray before food distribution outside a temporary shelter in Tijuana, Mexico December 1, 2018. 

(REUTERS/Alkis Konstantinidis)

Juan Francisco, 25, from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands of migrants from Central America traveling to the U.S., shows his tattoo of the 23rd Psalm of the Book of Psalms as he poses for a picture outside a temporary shelter in Tijuana, Mexico November 26, 2018. 

(REUTERS/Alkis Konstantinidis)

Victor Alfonso, 29, from Guatemala, part of a caravan of thousands of migrants from Central America traveling to the U.S., poses for a picture as he wears charms depicting the Virgin of Guadalupe at a temporary shelter in Tijuana, Mexico November 26, 2018. 

(REUTERS/Alkis Konstantinidis)

David Amador, 25, from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands of migrants from Central America traveling to the U.S., poses for a picture as he holds a cross at a temporary shelter in Tijuana, Mexico November 28, 2018. 

(REUTERS/Alkis Konstantinidis)

Migrants, part of a caravan of thousands from Central America traveling to the U.S., raise their hands while praying before moving by buses to a new shelter, in Tijuana, Mexico November 30, 2018. 

(REUTERS/Alkis Konstantinidis)

A migrant, part of a caravan of thousands from Central America traveling to the U.S., is wrapped with a banner depicting the Virgin of Guadalupe in front of a riot police cordon, as migrants try to reach the border wall between the U.S. and Mexico in Tijuana, Mexico November 25, 2018. 

(REUTERS/Alkis Konstantinidis)

Herso, 17, from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands of migrants from Central America traveling to the U.S., poses for a picture as he wears a t-shirt depicting the Virgin of Guadalupe outside a temporary shelter in Tijuana, Mexico November 24, 2018.

(REUTERS/Alkis Konstantinidis)

A booklet of Psalm 119:105 is left on a self-made tent at a temporary shelter of a caravan of thousands of migrants from Central America traveling to the U.S., in Tijuana, Mexico November 27, 2018.

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Migrants, part of a caravan from El Salvador traveling to the U.S., pray as they are blocked by the Mexican police during an operation to detain them for entering the country illegally, in Metapa, Mexico November 21, 2018. 

(REUTERS/Alkis Konstantinidis)

Migrants, part of a caravan of thousands from Central America traveling to the U.S., raise their hands as they listen to the preaching of pastor Jose Murcia (not pictured) outside a temporary shelter in Tijuana, Mexico November 24, 2018. 

(REUTERS/Alkis Konstantinidis)

A migrant, part of a caravan of thousands from Central America traveling to the U.S., sleeps with a book in Spanish "What does the Bible teach us?" in a temporary shelter in Tijuana, Mexico November 24, 2018. 

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A writing "Jesus Christ is the Lord" is seen on a car window outside a temporary shelter for a caravan of thousands of migrants from Central America traveling to the U.S., in Tijuana, Mexico November 24, 2018. 

(REUTERS/Alkis Konstantinidis)

Elmer, 29, from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands of migrants from Central America traveling to the U.S., poses for a picture as he holds an icon depicting Jesus Christ and the Virgin of Guadalupe while lining up for food distribution outside a temporary shelter in Tijuana, Mexico November 24, 2018. 

(REUTERS/Alkis Konstantinidis)

Juan Francisco, 25, from Honduras, part of a caravan of thousands of migrants from Central America traveling to the U.S., shows his tattoo reading "I can do everything with Christ who strengthens me" as he poses for a picture outside a temporary shelter in Tijuana, Mexico November 26, 2018. 

(REUTERS/Alkis Konstantinidis)

An image of the Virgin of Guadalupe is seen in a tent of migrants part of a caravan of thousands from Central America trying to reach the United States, on a street in Tijuana, Mexico, December 15, 2018.

(REUTERS/Carlos Garcia Rawlins)

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Politico reported that Chaldean Catholics are at high risk of being tortured or killed by the terror group ISIS in Iraq, according to the American Civil Liberties Union.

"There's a tremendous amount of anxiety in the community," Martin Manna of the Chaldean Community Foundation told Politico. "Iraq's not a safe place for many of the people who are being sent back."

Miriam Aukerman, an attorney with the American Civil Liberties Union, told Politico that deportation could mean certain death for some immigrants.

"Jimmy's death has devastated his family and us," she said in a statement. "We knew he would not survive if deported. What we don't know is how many more people ICE will send to their deaths."

"Jimmy Aldaoud ... should have never been sent to Iraq," Rep. Andy Levin, a Democrat from Michigan, said in a statement. "My Republican colleagues and I have repeatedly called on the executive branch to cease deportation of such vulnerable people. Now, someone has died."

Reps. Levin and John Moolenaar a Republican from Michigan introduced legislation earlier this year "that will grant two years of relief from detention and deportation for Iraqi nationals with orders of removal," according to a May 3 press release.

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