Every police officer in Stebbins, Alaska, has pleaded guilty to domestic violence charges

There are seven police officers in Stebbins, Alaska, and all of them have been convicted of domestic violence. 

The small town's police force is made up of officers with criminal records, including one man who was a registered sex offender, according to a new investigation by The Anchorage Daily News in partnership with ProPublica.

The city's lax hiring standards — which the investigation found were common elsewhere in rural Alaska — are tied to understaffing and a lack of sufficient funds. Officers in Stebbins are paid just $14 an hour

As a result, options are limited in the village, which has a population of less than 600. All seven men currently employed by the department — including the police chief —have pleaded guilty to domestic violence charges in the past decade. 

Nimeron Mike, the convicted sex offender, was hired the same day he turned in his application, despite the fact that he'd spent six years in prison for a slew of crimes that included assault, groping a woman, hindering prosecution and choking a woman unconscious in an attempted sexual assault. 

"Am I a cop now? It's like, that easy?" Mike told reporters he remembered thinking at the time.

RELATED: How climate change is affecting one Alaskan town

25 PHOTOS
Global warming affecting one Alaska town
See Gallery
Global warming affecting one Alaska town
NEWTOK, AK - JULY 06: The marshy, tundra landscape surrounding Newtok is seen from a plane on July 6, 2015 outside Newtok, Alaska. Newtok, which has a population of approximately of 375 ethnically Yupik people, was established along the shores of the Ninglick River, near where the river meets the Bering Sea, by the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) in 1959. The Yupik people have lived on the coastal lands along the Bering Sea for thousands of years. However, as global temperatures rise the village is being threatened by the melting of permafrost; greater ice and snow melt - which is causing the Ninglick river to widen and erode the river bank; and larger storms that come in from the Bering Sea, which further erodes the land. According to the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers, the high point in Newtok - the school - could be underwater by 2017. A new village, approximately nine miles away titled Mertarvik, has been established, though so far families have been slow to relocate to the new village. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
NEWTOK, AK - JULY 05: Joseph John Jr. collects fresh water for his family at the fresh water storage tank - one of the only places to get fresh water in town - on July 5, 2015 in Newtok, Alaska. Newtok, which is having to relocate due to melting permafrost and rapid erosion of the river it is established next to, has to have all its fuel and fresh water brought in aboard tankers. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
NEWTOK, AK - JULY 05: Boys play on storage tanks for fuel on July 5, 2015 in Newtok, Alaska. Newtok, which is having to relocate due to melting permafrost and rapid erosion of the river it is established next to, has to have all its fuel and fresh water brought in aboard tankers. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
NEWTOK, AK - JULY 05: Boys play next to the fresh water storage tank - one of the only places to get fresh water in town - on July 5, 2015 in Newtok, Alaska. Newtok, which is having to relocate due to melting permafrost and rapid erosion of the river it is established next to, has to have all its fuel and fresh water brought in aboard tankers. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
NEWTOK, AK - JULY 04: A child plays on a piece of machinery during Fourth of July celebrations on July 4, 2015 in Newtok, Alaska. Newtok is one of several remote Alaskan villages that is being forced to relocate due to warming temperatures which is causing the melting of permafrost, widening of rivers and coastline and erosion to the land. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
NEWTOK, AK - JULY 04: A child relaxes on a piece of machinery during Fourth of July celebrations on July 4, 2015 in Newtok, Alaska. Newtok is one of several remote Alaskan villages that is being forced to relocate due to warming temperatures which is causing the melting of permafrost, widening of rivers and coastline and erosion to the land. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
NEWTOK, AK - JULY 03: A destroyed snow machine lies in the grass on July 3, 2015 in Newtok, Alaska. Newtok is one of several remote Alaskan villages that is being forced to relocate due to warming tempertures which is causing the melting of permafrost, widening of rivers and the erosion of land and coastline. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
NEWTOK, AK - JULY 03: A puppy sits next to a walrus skull and a chain saw on July 3, 2015 in Newtok, Alaska. Newtok is one of several remote Alaskan villages that is being forced to relocate due to warming tempertures which is causing the melting of permafrost, widening of rivers and the erosion of land and coastline. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
NEWTOK, AK - JULY 03: Jamin Tom takes his family to see his parents by way of a four wheeler with a trailer attached on July 3, 2015 in Newtok, Alaska. Newtok is one of several remote Alaskan villages that is being forced to relocate due to warming tempertures which is causing the melting of permafrost, widening of rivers and the erosion of land and coastline. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
NEWTOK, AK - JULY 03: A boy hangs out on the front steps of his great-grandmother's house on July 3, 2015 in Newtok, Alaska. Newtok is one of several remote Alaskan villages that is being forced to relocate due to warming tempertures which is causing the melting of permafrost, widening of rivers and the erosion of land and coastline. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
NEWTOK, AK - JULY 03: Newtok homes are seen situation amongst ponds and tall grass on July 3, 2015 in Newtok, Alaska. Newtok is one of several remote Alaskan villages that is being forced to relocate due to warming tempertures which is causing the melting of permafrost, widening of rivers and the erosion of land and coastline. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
NEWTOK, AK - JULY 03: Erosion on the shores of the Ninglick River is seen on July 3, 2015 in Newtok, Alaska. Newtok is one of several remote Alaskan villages that is being forced to relocate due to warming tempertures which is causing the melting of permafrost, widening of rivers and the erosion of land and coastline. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
NEWTOK, AK - JULY 02: Polo the dog eats a freshly killed beaver during a hunting expedition on Nelson Island on July 2, 2015 near Newtok, Alaska. Newtok has a population of approximately of 375 ethnically Yupik people and was established along the shores of the Ninglick River, near where the river empties into the Bering Sea, by the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) in 1959. The Yupik people have lived on the coastal lands along the Bering Sea for thousands of years. As global temperatures rise the village is being threatened by the melting of permafrost, greater ice and snow melt and larger storms from the Bering Sea. According to the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers, the highest elevated point in Newtok - the school - could be underwater by 2017. Approximately nine miles away, Mertarvik has been established, though families have been slow to relocate to the new village. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
NEWTOK, AK - JULY 02: Rodrick Stewart (L) and Robert Page hunt for beaver on Nelson Island on July 2, 2015 near Newtok, Alaska. Newtok has a population of approximately of 375 ethnically Yupik people and was established along the shores of the Ninglick River, near where the river empties into the Bering Sea, by the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) in 1959. The Yupik people have lived on the coastal lands along the Bering Sea for thousands of years. As global temperatures rise the village is being threatened by the melting of permafrost, greater ice and snow melt and larger storms from the Bering Sea. According to the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers, the highest elevated point in Newtok - the school - could be underwater by 2017. Approximately nine miles away, Mertarvik has been established, though families have been slow to relocate to the new village. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
NEWTOK, AK - JULY 01: Joseph John Jr. eats a freshly caught salmon with his sons and friends while waiting for the tide to come in after a day of salmon fishing on July 1, 2015 in Newtok, Alaska. Newtok has a population of approximately of 375 ethnically Yupik people and was established along the shores of the Ninglick River, near where the river empties into the Bering Sea, by the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) in 1959. The Yupik people have lived on the coastal lands along the Bering Sea for thousands of years. As global temperatures rise the village is being threatened by the melting of permafrost, greater ice and snow melt and larger storms from the Bering Sea. According to the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers, the highest elevated point in Newtok - the school - could be underwater by 2017. Approximately nine miles away, Mertarvik has been established, though families have been slow to relocate to the new village. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
NEWTOK, AK - JULY 01: Joseph John Jr. washes freshly caught salmon with his son, Jeremiah John, while waiting for the tide to come in on July 1, 2015 in Newtok, Alaska. Newtok has a population of approximately of 375 ethnically Yupik people and was established along the shores of the Ninglick River, near where the river empties into the Bering Sea, by the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) in 1959. The Yupik people have lived on the coastal lands along the Bering Sea for thousands of years. As global temperatures rise the village is being threatened by the melting of permafrost, greater ice and snow melt and larger storms from the Bering Sea. According to the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers, the highest elevated point in Newtok - the school - could be underwater by 2017. Approximately nine miles away, Mertarvik has been established, though families have been slow to relocate to the new village. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
NEWTOK, AK - JULY 01: Joseph John Jr. and his son Jeremiah John haul in nets while salmon fishing on July 1, 2015 in Newtok, Alaska. Newtok has a population of approximately of 375 ethnically Yupik people and was established along the shores of the Ninglick River, near where the river empties into the Bering Sea, by the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) in 1959. The Yupik people have lived on the coastal lands along the Bering Sea for thousands of years. As global temperatures rise the village is being threatened by the melting of permafrost, greater ice and snow melt and larger storms from the Bering Sea. According to the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers, the highest elevated point in Newtok - the school - could be underwater by 2017. Approximately nine miles away, Mertarvik has been established, though families have been slow to relocate to the new village. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
NEWTOK, AK - JULY 01: Yupik men prepare a boat to go fishing for salmon on July 1, 2015 in Newtok, Alaska. Newtok has a population of approximately of 375 ethnically Yupik people and was established along the shores of the Ninglick River, near where the river empties into the Bering Sea, by the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) in 1959. The Yupik people have lived on the coastal lands along the Bering Sea for thousands of years. As global temperatures rise the village is being threatened by the melting of permafrost, greater ice and snow melt and larger storms from the Bering Sea. According to the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers, the highest elevated point in Newtok - the school - could be underwater by 2017. Approximately nine miles away, Mertarvik has been established, though families have been slow to relocate to the new village. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
NEWTOK, AK - JULY 01: Joseph John Jr. relaxes with his son, Samuel John, age 8, while waiting for the tide to come in after a day of salmon fishing on July 1, 2015 in Newtok, Alaska. Newtok has a population of approximately of 375 ethnically Yupik people and was established along the shores of the Ninglick River, near where the river empties into the Bering Sea, by the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) in 1959. The Yupik people have lived on the coastal lands along the Bering Sea for thousands of years. As global temperatures rise the village is being threatened by the melting of permafrost, greater ice and snow melt and larger storms from the Bering Sea. According to the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers, the highest elevated point in Newtok - the school - could be underwater by 2017. Approximately nine miles away, Mertarvik has been established, though families have been slow to relocate to the new village. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
NEWTOK, AK - JULY 01: Samuel John sits at the bow of his father's boat while heading out to go salmon fishing on July 1, 2015 in Newtok, Alaska. Newtok has a population of approximately of 375 ethnically Yupik people and was established along the shores of the Ninglick River, near where the river empties into the Bering Sea, by the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) in 1959. The Yupik people have lived on the coastal lands along the Bering Sea for thousands of years. As global temperatures rise the village is being threatened by the melting of permafrost, greater ice and snow melt and larger storms from the Bering Sea. According to the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers, the highest elevated point in Newtok - the school - could be underwater by 2017. Approximately nine miles away, Mertarvik has been established, though families have been slow to relocate to the new village. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
NEWTOK, AK - JUNE 30: Yupik children play during summer vacation on June 30, 2015 in Newtok, Alaska. Newtok, which has a population of approximately of 375 ethnically Yupik people, was established along the shores of the Ninglick River, near where the river empties into the Bering Sea, by the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) in 1959. The Yupik people have lived on the coastal lands along the Bering Sea for thousands of years. However, as global temperatures rise the village is being threatened by the melting of permafrost; greater ice and snow melt - which is causing the Ninglick river to widen and erode the river bank; and larger storms that come in from the Bering Sea, which further erodes the land. According to the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers, the high point in Newtok - the school - could be underwater by 2017. A new village, approximately nine miles away titled Mertarvik, has been established, though so far families have been slow to relocate to the new village. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
NEWTOK, AK - JUNE 30: Yupik children play during summer vacation on June 30, 2015 in Newtok, Alaska. Newtok, which has a population of approximately of 375 ethnically Yupik people, was established along the shores of the Ninglick River, near where the river empties into the Bering Sea, by the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) in 1959. The Yupik people have lived on the coastal lands along the Bering Sea for thousands of years. However, as global temperatures rise the village is being threatened by the melting of permafrost; greater ice and snow melt - which is causing the Ninglick river to widen and erode the river bank; and larger storms that come in from the Bering Sea, which further erodes the land. According to the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers, the high point in Newtok - the school - could be underwater by 2017. A new village, approximately nine miles away titled Mertarvik, has been established, though so far families have been slow to relocate to the new village. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
NEWTOK, AK - JUNE 30: Strips of freshly caught salmon hang to dry on June 30, 2015 in Newtok, Alaska. Newtok, which has a population of approximately of 375 ethnically Yupik people, was established along the shores of the Ninglick River, near where the river empties into the Bering Sea, by the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) in 1959. The Yupik people have lived on the coastal lands along the Bering Sea for thousands of years. However, as global temperatures rise the village is being threatened by the melting of permafrost; greater ice and snow melt - which is causing the Ninglick river to widen and erode the river bank; and larger storms that come in from the Bering Sea, which further erodes the land. According to the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers, the high point in Newtok - the school - could be underwater by 2017. A new village, approximately nine miles away titled Mertarvik, has been established, though so far families have been slow to relocate to the new village. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
NEWTOK, AK - JUNE 30: A Yupik child stands on raised, wooden sidewalks, used to help cross unstable ground, on June 30, 2015 in Newtok, Alaska. Newtok, which has a population of approximately of 375 ethnically Yupik people, was established along the shores of the Ninglick River, near where the river empties into the Bering Sea, by the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) in 1959. The Yupik people have lived on the coastal lands along the Bering Sea for thousands of years. However, as global temperatures rise the village is being threatened by the melting of permafrost; greater ice and snow melt - which is causing the Ninglick river to widen and erode the river bank; and larger storms that come in from the Bering Sea, which further erodes the land. According to the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers, the high point in Newtok - the school - could be underwater by 2017. A new village, approximately nine miles away titled Mertarvik, has been established, though so far families have been slow to relocate to the new village. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
NEWTOK, AK - JUNE 29: The marshy landscape surrounding Newtok is seen from a plane on June 29, 2015 outside Newtok, Alaska. Newtok, which has a population of approximately of 375 ethnically Yupik people, was established along the shores of the Ninglick River, near where the river empties into the Bering Sea, by the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) in 1959. The Yupik people have lived on the coastal lands along the Bering Sea for thousands of years. However, as global temperatures rise the village is being threatened by the melting of permafrost; greater ice and snow melt - which is causing the Ninglick river to widen and erode the river bank; and larger storms that come in from the Bering Sea, which further erodes the land. According to the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers, the high point in Newtok - the school - could be underwater by 2017. A new village, approximately nine miles away titled Mertarvik, has been established, though so far families have been slow to relocate to the new village. (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

Mike was terminated in March, although seemingly not because of his criminal record. Instead, the city's administrator told The Anchorage Daily Times it was because he wasn’t answering phone calls and didn’t get along with one of his co-workers. 

The town's current police chief pleaded guilty to throwing a teenager to the ground and threatening to kill her in 2017. He was hired the following year. 

"It's outrageous that we have a situation where we have such a lack of public safety that communities are resorting to hiring people who have the propensity for violence," Melanie Bahnke, a board member for the Alaska Federation of Natives, told The Anchorage Daily Times. 

Additionally, only one officer in Stebbins has received any sort of formal law enforcement training. 

The investigation found evidence of underfunded departments throughout Alaska, reporting that one third of the state's communities have no police force whatsoever. The crisis led U.S. Attorney General William P. Barr to declare an emergency for public safety in the state's rural areas last month. 

Read Full Story