DR officials claim Georgia man who allegedly vomited blood died of 'natural causes'

A Georgia man who allegedly vomited blood in the Dominican Republic died of "natural causes," government officials said. 

In a statement to AOL, a spokesperson for Minister of Tourism Francisco Javier Garcia said that an autopsy showed that Tracy Jerome Jester Jr., of Forsyth, died of "basal bilateral pneumonia, which produced a pleural effusion and acute respiratory insufficiency."

"Mr. Jester’s family confirmed that he had a pathological history of bronchial asthma and Lupus," the spokesperson said in a statement. "The autopsy findings support that Mr. Jester’s passing was isolated in occurrence." 

Jester died on March 17 while vacationing with his sister at a resort, the U.S. State Department and his family revealed on Sunday.

"We can confirm the death of a U.S. citizen in the Dominican Republic in March 2019," a state department spokesman said in a statement. "We offer our sincerest condolences to the family for their loss. Out of respect for the family during this difficult time, we do not have additional information to provide."

Jester and his sibling had reportedly spent the previous day sightseeing before the 31-year-old "dropped to his knees and started throwing up blood, and was calling for Mama."

Jester's mother, Melody Moore, claimed that he had taken a sip of a soda that didn't "taste right." She is now convinced that his passing is connected to the mysterious deaths that have taken place at resorts across the Caribbean country. 

"Being a mom, I want to go to where he was, where he died at last," she told WSB-TV. "Something is wrong, my son is gone. Something is really wrong."

Since last year, at least 10 American tourists have passed away in the Dominican Republic under suspicious circumstances, many of which have involved the consumption of alcohol or use of hotel amenities. The victims include New Yorker Donette Edge Cannon, Pennsylvania woman Yvette Monique Sport, Maryland resident David Harrison, Californian Robert Wallace, Ohio resident Jerry Curran, Pennsylvania resident Miranda Schaup-Werner, Maryland couple Edward Nathaniel Holmes and Cynthia Day, California resident Robert Turlock, New York resident Leyla Cox, New Jersey resident Joseph Allen and Denver resident Khalid Adkins.

While the FBI is assisting Dominican authorities with their investigation into at least three of the deaths, Dominican officials have repeatedly dismissed the notion that their country is unsafe for tourists. 

"Sometimes in life, there can be a law of sequences," Garcia told Fox News in an interview last month. "Sometimes, nothing may happen to you in a year. But in another week, three things might happen to you." 

RELATED: See scenes from the Dominican Republic: 

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Scenes from the Dominican Republic
In this April 5, 2017 photo, a bath tub stands in one of the rooms inside the Casa del Diseñador, part of the Casas del XVI boutique hotel in the Colonial Zone of Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic. According to government statistics, only 15 percent of visitors to the Dominican Republic spent time in Santo Domingo and only 3 percent slept there, drawn away by all-included packages at beach resorts and dissuaded by the lack of high-quality lodging inside Santo Domingo's walled city. (AP Photo/Tatiana Fernandez)
In this April 5, 2017 photo, a baseball player exercises while employees from the Ministry of Environment clean up the Fray Anton de Montesinos beach in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic. According to government statistics, only 15 percent of visitors to the Dominican Republic spent time in Santo Domingo and only 3 percent slept there, drawn away by all-included packages at beach resorts and dissuaded by the lack of high-quality lodging inside Santo Domingo's walled city. (AP Photo/Tatiana Fernandez)
A man walks away from Los Yayales beach after watching the sea surge due to the approach of Hurricane Irene to Nagua, in the northern coast of the Dominican Republic, Monday, Aug, 22, 2011. A strengthening Category 2 Hurricane Irene roared off the Dominican Republic's resort-dotted northern coast on Monday night, whipping up high waves and torrential downpours on a track that could slam it into the U.S. Southeast as a major storm by the end of the week. (AP Photo/Roberto Guzman)
Paralyzed constructions are seen at the Cap Cana Resort in Punta Cana, Dominican Republic, Tuesday, Nov. 18, 2008. The global financial crisis has halted work on this multimillion dollar project overlooking a turquoise sea, turning it into a ghost resort. It is among growing signs that the Caribbean is headed for tough times as construction workers and resort employees are laid off by the hundreds and anticipated peak season bookings are at a trickle. (AP Photo/Kena Betancur)
A view of the stalled construction of the Punta Palmera Condominium at the Cap Cana Resort in Punta Cana, Dominican Republic, Saturday, Nov. 15, 2008. The global financial crisis has halted work on this multimillion dollar project overlooking a turquoise sea, turning it into a ghost resort. It is among growing signs that the Caribbean is headed for tough times as construction workers and resort employees are laid off by the hundreds and anticipated peak season bookings are at a trickle. (AP Photo/Kena Betancur)
Tourists sunbathe in the Bahia Tortuga Resort in Punta Cana, Dominican Republic, Monday, Nov. 17, 2008. The global financial crisis has halted work on this multimillion dollar project overlooking a turquoise sea, turning it into a ghost resort. It is among growing signs that the Caribbean is headed for tough times as construction workers and resort employees are laid off by the hundreds and anticipated peak season bookings are at a trickle. (AP Photo/Kena Betancur)
The sun sets over the Cap Cana Resort in Punta Cana, Dominican Republic, Friday, Nov. 14, 2008. The global financial crisis has halted work on this multimillion dollar project overlooking a turquoise sea, turning it into a ghost resort. It is among growing signs that the Caribbean is headed for tough times as construction workers and resort employees are laid off by the hundreds and anticipated peak season bookings are at a trickle. (AP Photo/Kena Betancur)
** FOR USE WITH AP WEEKLY FEATURES ** American tourists sunbathe at the Casa de Campo resort in La Romana on Friday, June 2, 2006. Smooth skin with a summer glow can best be achieved by preparing the skin early. (AP Photo/Alexandre Meneghini)
PUNTA CANA, DOMINICAN REPUBLIC - JUNE 21: A sign is seen for down town Punta Cana as authorities continue to investigate the unexpected deaths of tourists in some of the area resorts on June 21, 2019 in Punta Cana, Dominican Republic. According to news reports and the United States State Department, seven Americans have become ill and died this year and two more families are reported to have come forward saying their relatives died unexpectedly last year while staying at resorts in the Dominican Republic. The FBI is assisting the Dominican authorities in the investigation into why tourists are dying. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
LA ROMANA, DOMINICAN REPUBLIC - JUNE 21: A sign is seen near the entrance to the Grand Bahia Principe La Romana on June 21, 2019 in La Romana, Dominican Republic. According to reports three American guests have died unexpectedly while visiting the resort. According to news reports and the United States State Department, seven Americans have become ill and died this year and two more families are reported to have come forward saying their relatives died unexpectedly last year while staying at resorts in the Dominican Republic. The FBI is assisting the Dominican authorities in the investigation into why tourists are dying. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
LA ROMANA, DOMINICAN REPUBLIC - JUNE 21: The beach area that abuts the Grand Bahia Principe La Romana is seen on June 21, 2019 in La Romana, Dominican Republic. According to reports, three American guests have died unexpectedly while visiting the resort. According to news reports and the United States State Department, seven Americans have become ill and died this year and two more families are reported to have come forward saying their relatives died unexpectedly last year while staying at resorts in the Dominican Republic. The FBI is assisting the Dominican authorities in the investigation into why tourists are dying. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
PUNTA CANA, DOMINICAN REPUBLIC - JUNE 21: The entrance to the Bahia Principe resort is seen on June 21, 2019 in Punta Cana, Dominican Republic. The resort is where, according to family members, a tourist died unexpectedly after getting sick. According to news reports and the United States State Department, seven Americans have become ill and died this year and two more families are reported to have come forward saying their relatives died unexpectedly last year while staying at resorts in the Dominican Republic. The FBI is assisting the Dominican authorities in the investigation into why tourists are dying. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
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Following recent news of Jester's death, however, a spokesperson for Garcia was more conciliatory in a statement, noting certain steps the Dominican government has since taken to address tourists's concerns. 

"The capacity for hotel inspections is being doubled to ensure strict compliance with food and beverage regulations and environmental standards," the statement read. "Medical offices within hotel facilities and the professional qualifications of its doctors and staff will be scrutinized and verified."

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