Trump administration moves to end asylum protections for most Central American migrants

The Trump administration announced Monday it will move to end asylum protections for most Central American migrants in the government's latest major attempt to restrict the influx of migrant families coming to the United States.

The new rule says asylum-seekers who pass through another country and do not seek asylum there will not be eligible for asylum in the United States, according to a statement from the Department of Homeland Security.

The Departments of Justice and Homeland Security said in the statement they were adding a new bar to eligibility for asylum for a migrant "who enters or attempts to enter the United States across the southern border, but who did not apply for protection from persecution or torture where it was available in at least one third country outside" the migrants country of citizenship or last lawful residence "through which he or she transited en route to the United States."

"Until Congress can act, this interim rule will help reduce a major 'pull' factor driving irregular migration to the United States and enable DHS and DOJ to more quickly and efficiently process cases originating from the southern border, leading to fewer individuals transiting through Mexico on a dangerous journey," Department of Homeland Security Acting Secretary Kevin McAleenan said in the statement.

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Abisai Montes Marroquin, 11, spends the afternoon at the mall with mother Maria Marroquin Perdomo and father Edward Montes Lopez in New Orleans, Louisiana, U.S., July 16, 2018. REUTERS/Loren Elliott 
Maria Marroquin Perdomo waits for toenail polish to dry after getting a pedicure at a mall in New Orleans, Louisiana, U.S., July 16, 2018. Marroquin Perdomo said her toes were in bad shape following the arduous journey from Honduras to the Mexico-U.S. border and her time spent in detention. REUTERS/Loren Elliott 
Abisai Montes Marroquin, 11, and his parents Edward Montes Lopez and Maria Marroquin Perdomo return to the apartment Montes Lopez shares with other family members in New Orleans, Louisiana, U.S., July 16, 2018. The apartment was overcrowded when Montes Marroquin and Marroquin Perdomo arrived, so Montes Lopez began talking of finding an apartment for the three of them. REUTERS/Loren Elliott 
Maria Marroquin Perdomo gets a pedicure at a mall in New Orleans, Louisiana, U.S., July 16, 2018. Marroquin Perdomo said her toes were in bad shape following the arduous journey from Honduras to the Mexico-U.S. border and her time spent in detention. REUTERS/Loren Elliott 
Abisai Montes Marroquin, 11, sits with his father Edward Montes Lopez and mother Maria Marroquin Perdomo while video-chatting with family back in Honduras on their first night together in New Orleans, Louisiana, U.S., July 15, 2018. REUTERS/Loren Elliott 
Maria Marroquin Perdomo and her 11-year-old son Abisai look for their gate before flying to New Orleans, Louisiana, at Valley International Airport in Harlingen, Texas, U.S., July 15, 2018. It was the first time either had ever been on an airplane. REUTERS/Loren Elliott 
Abisai Montes Marroquin, 11, meets his father, Edward Montes Lopez, for the first time at Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport in New Orleans, Louisiana, U.S., July 15, 2018. Montes Lopez hadn't seen his son since he was an infant. REUTERS/Loren Elliott 
Abisai Montes Marroquin, 11, helps his mother Maria Marroquin Perdomo set up her new cell phone while at a mall in New Orleans, Louisiana, U.S., July 16, 2018. REUTERS/Loren Elliott 
Abisai Montes Marroquin, 11, arrives at La Posada Providencia shelter shortly after being reunified with his mother in San Benito, Texas, U.S., July 14, 2018. REUTERS/Loren Elliott 
Abisai Montes Marroquin, 11, runs toward his father, Edward Montes Lopez, as he meets him for the first time at Louis Armstrong New Orleans International Airport in New Orleans, Louisiana, U.S., July 15, 2018. Montes Lopez hadn't seen his son since he was an infant. REUTERS/Loren Elliott 
Maria Marroquin Perdomo and her 11-year-old son Abisai travel to New Orleans, Louisiana, U.S., from Harlingen, Texas, U.S., July 15, 2018. It was the first time either had ever been on an airplane. REUTERS/Loren Elliott 
Maria Marroquin Perdomo and 11-year-old son Abisai sit at their gate before flying to New Orleans, Louisiana, at Valley International Airport in Harlingen, Texas, U.S., July 15, 2018. It was the first time either had ever been on an airplane. REUTERS/Loren Elliott 
Abisai Montes Marroquin, 11, plays after arriving at La Posada Providencia shelter in San Benito, Texas, U.S., July 14, 2018. The boy was reunified with his mother hours earlier. REUTERS/Loren Elliott 
Abisai Montes Marroquin, 11, looks at messages and drawings made for him by his mother and the fellow mothers she befriended while the women were detained at the Port Isabel detention center, before bed at La Posada Providencia shelter in San Benito, Texas, U.S., July 14, 2018. The boy was reunified with his mother hours earlier. REUTERS/Loren Elliott 
After being reunified with her 11-year-old son, Maria Marroquin Perdomo cries during a phone call with the boy's father in Brownsville, Texas, U.S., July 14, 2018. REUTERS/Loren Elliott 
Maria Marroquin Perdomo and her 11-year-old son Abisai arrive at La Posada Providencia shelter with the help of immigration attorney Jodi Goodwin, in San Benito, Texas, U.S., July 14, 2018. REUTERS/Loren Elliott 
Maria Marroquin Perdomo and her 11-year-old son Abisai stop at a gas station for a snack after departing the Casa Padre facility, where the two were reunified, in Brownsville, Texas, U.S., July 14, 2018. Marroquin Perdomo's attorney drove the pair from the gas station to La Posada Providencia shelter in San Benito, Texas, U.S., to spend their first night together. REUTERS/Loren Elliott 
Maria Marroquin Perdomo and her 11-year-old son Abisai drive away from the Casa Padre facility in the backseat of her attorney's truck minutes after mother and son were reunified, in Brownsville, Texas, U.S., July 14, 2018. Abisai was held at Casa Padre while his mother was detained at the Port Isabel detention facility. REUTERS/Loren Elliott
Maria Marroquin Perdomo reacts to the news that her detained son had been cleared for release, at La Posada Providencia shelter in San Benito, Texas, U.S., July 14, 2018. Marroquin Perdomo headed to the facility holding him minutes later with her attorney for their reunification. REUTERS/Loren Elliott 
Maria Marroquin Perdomo passes the time before a hopeful reunification with her detained son while staying at La Posada Providencia shelter in San Benito, Texas, U.S., July 14, 2018. REUTERS/Loren Elliott 
Maria Marroquin Perdomo is driven by a local volunteer from the Port Isabel detention center near Los Fresnos, Texas, U.S., to La Posada Providencia shelter in San Benito, Texas, U.S., July 13, 2018. She is clutching release paperwork including information regarding the location of her detained son. REUTERS/Loren Elliott 
Maria Marroquin Perdomo and her 11-year-old son Abisai drive away from the Casa Padre facility in the backseat of her attorney's truck minutes after mother and son were reunified in Brownsville, Texas, U.S., July 14, 2018. Abisai was held at Casa Padre while his mother was detained at the Port Isabel detention facility. REUTERS/Loren Elliott 
Maria Marroquin Perdomo gets settled with the help of Sister Margaret Mertens at La Posada Providencia shelter in San Benito, Texas, U.S., shortly after her release from the Port Isabel detention center, July 13, 2018. REUTERS/Loren Elliott 
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The new rule was subject to three exceptions, according to the statement. The exceptions were for migrants who did apply for protection in at least one of the countries and were denied, migrants who demonstrate they meet the definition of a "victim of a severe form of trafficking in persons," or came to the U.S. through only a country or countries that were not parties to the 1951 Convention relating to the Status of Refugees, the 1967 Protocol, or the Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment.

The rule is set to be published in the Federal Register on Tuesday and would be effective immediately, according to the statement.

The move represents an escalation of President Donald Trump's attempt to deter Central American families to come to the United States to seek asylum. Earlier this year, the administration also enacted a policy forcing some migrants to wait in Mexico for the duration of their asylum cases. The administration has since been expanding the policy to include multiple cities across the U.S.-Mexico border.

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