43-year-old El Salvador migrant dies in U.S. border custody

WASHINGTON (AP) — A 43-year-old El Salvadoran man who crossed into the U.S. with his daughter collapsed at a border station and later died at a hospital, officials said Saturday.

The man had been held about a week at the Rio Grande Valley central processing center in McAllen, Texas, according to a law enforcement official. The official said the man, who had health issues, had been medically checked.

The daughter was still in U.S. Border Patrol custody, but officials had requested an expedited transfer to a shelter run by the agency that manages children who cross the border alone, the official said. The official did not know the daughter's age.

The child will be in a shelter until she is released to a sponsor, but that process could take weeks. The official was not authorized to divulge details of an ongoing investigation and spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity.

RELATED: Iraqi migrant trains to become US Border Patrol agent

25 PHOTOS
Iraqi migrant trains to become US border patrol agent
See Gallery
Iraqi migrant trains to become US border patrol agent
Border patrol agents stand next to a border fence used for training at the United States Border Patrol Academy in Artesia, New Mexico, U.S., June 8, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson 
Border patrol trainee Stevany Shakare (2nd L), 23, from Iraq, takes part in a physical training class at the United States Border Patrol Academy in Artesia, New Mexico, U.S., June 8, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson 
A collage of photos of border patrol agents killed in the line of duty is seen at the United States Border Patrol Academy in Artesia, New Mexico, U.S., June 8, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson 
Adrian Salayandia, 29, holds up the photo of the Fallen Heroes card he will carry with him throughout his training and career, depicting a border patrol agent killed in the line of duty, at the United States Border Patrol Academy in Artesia, New Mexico, U.S., June 8, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson 
Border patrol agents listen to a graduation ceremony at the United States Border Patrol Academy in Artesia, New Mexico, U.S., June 9, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
Border patrol agents demonstrate a training exercise with actors playing the roles of migrants at the United States Border Patrol Academy in Artesia, New Mexico, U.S., June 8, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson 
Supervisory Border Patrol Agent Frank Ayala stands in front of Spanish numbers in a classroom at the United States Border Patrol Academy in Artesia, New Mexico, U.S., June 8, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson 
Border patrol agents demonstrate a training exercise with actors playing the roles of migrants at the United States Border Patrol Academy in Artesia, New Mexico, U.S., June 8, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
Border patrol trainees learn to process migrants at the United States Border Patrol Academy in Artesia, New Mexico, U.S., June 8, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
Border patrol graduate Luciano Diaz Jr. (C), 23, poses for a photo with his mother, Rubelinda Diaz and father Luciano Diaz after graduating from the United States Border Patrol Academy in Artesia, New Mexico, U.S., June 9, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson 
Rene Ramirez, 10, whose parents are both border patrol agents, plays with his mother's hat after his father graduated from the United States Border Patrol Academy in Artesia, New Mexico, U.S., June 9, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson 
A border patrol agent hugs his family after graduating from the United States Border Patrol Academy in Artesia, New Mexico, U.S., June 9, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
A border patrol trainee's gun belt and water bottle is seen on the floor of the gym at the United States Border Patrol Academy in Artesia, New Mexico, U.S., June 8, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
Border patrol agents demonstrate an exercise at the United States Border Patrol Academy in Artesia, New Mexico, U.S., June 8, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson 
The bullet-proof vest of a border patrol agent is seen at the United States Border Patrol Academy in Artesia, New Mexico, U.S., June 8, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
Supervisory Border Patrol Agent Frank Ayala points out where migrants are sometimes found on trains at the United States Border Patrol Academy in Artesia, New Mexico, U.S., June 8, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
Border patrol trainee Stevany Shakare (2nd L), 23, from Iraq, eats lunch with other trainees at the United States Border Patrol Academy in Artesia, New Mexico, U.S., June 8, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson 
Border patrol trainees take part in pistol training at the United States Border Patrol Academy in Artesia, New Mexico, U.S., June 9, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
Border patrol trainees learn how to testify in court at the United States Border Patrol Academy in Artesia, New Mexico, U.S., June 8, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson 
Border patrol agents conduct an exercise at the United States Border Patrol Academy in Artesia, New Mexico, U.S., June 8, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
A border patrol instructor demonstrates a lifesaving drill at the United States Border Patrol Academy in Artesia, New Mexico, U.S., June 8, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
Border patrol trainee Stevany Shakare, 23, from Iraq, takes part in a physical training class at the United States Border Patrol Academy in Artesia, New Mexico, U.S., June 8, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
A border patrol trainee fills out paperwork at the United States Border Patrol Academy in Artesia, New Mexico, U.S., June 8, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson 
Border patrol trainee Stevany Shakare (3rd R), 23, from Iraq, takes part in a physical training class at the United States Border Patrol Academy in Artesia, New Mexico, U.S., June 8, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson 
Border patrol trainee Stevany Shakare, 23, from Iraq, runs during physical training class at the United States Border Patrol Academy in Artesia, New Mexico, U.S., June 9, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

According to a statement from U.S. Customs and Border Protection, the man's cause of death is not yet known.

The facility, like most other Border Patrol stations along the U.S.-Mexico border, is overcrowded. A review of the death was underway, and Congress and the inspector general for the Department of Homeland Security, the watchdog that oversees the border agencies, has been notified, according to the statement. So was the El Salvadoran government.

Border stations are generally at capacity with about 4,000 people, and more than 15,000 are in custody. Advocates and attorneys have decried fetid, filthy conditions inside the stations that were not meant as more than a temporary holding station.

Even with expedited processing, it's not clear how long the daughter would remain at the McAllen facility. Teens and children are only supposed to be held for 72 hours, but because of massive delays in the system, they are held for several days or weeks.

At least two other adults and five children have died in custody since December, including a teenage boy who died from the flu and had been at the central processing center in McAllen last month. More than two dozen others were sick with flu in an outbreak there in May, and the facility was briefly shut down and sanitized.

To help with the care of migrants in custody, Congress has sent President Donald Trump a $4.6 billion aid package. Administration officials say they are expecting a 25% drop in crossings in the month of June.

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.