Trump admin owes D.C. government $7M for inauguration

WASHINGTON, June 15 (Reuters) - The Trump administration and Congress still owe the District of Columbia government $7 million for expenses related to the 2017 presidential inauguration, the Washington Post reported on Friday, raising questions about who will foot the bill for the president's planned July 4 speech at the Lincoln Memorial.

Citing city and federal financial records, the Washington Post reported that the DC government has had to dip into a special fund dedicated to city security costs to protect against terrorist threats and for hosting large demonstrations, foreign dignitary visits and other non-routine events.

That fund is usually replenished with federal money, but the Post reported that it is on track to fall short of funds this fall.

RELATED: Washington, D.C. prepares for Donald Trump's inauguration

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Washington D.C. prepares for Donald Trump's Inauguration
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Washington D.C. prepares for Donald Trump's Inauguration
The U.S. Capitol is seen during a rehearsal for the inauguration ceremony of U.S. President-elect Donald Trump in Washington, U.S., January 15, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
Stand-ins for President-elect Donald Trump and his wife Melania rehearse the swearing-in ceremony portion of the inauguration at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S. January 15, 2017. Army SGM Gregory Lowery and SPC Sara Corry are the stand-ins for the Trumps. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
Empty seats are seen at the National Mall during a rehearsal for the inauguration ceremony of U.S. President-elect Donald Trump in Washington, U.S., January 15, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Army Sergeant Major Greg Lowery (L) playing the part of President-elect Donald Trump, and Army Spc. Sara Corry, playing the part of Melania Trump, walk along the parade route during a dress rehearsal for Inauguration Day, in Washington January 15, 2017. REUTERS/Evan Vucci/Pool
Chain link fencing is up around the Washington Monument as a security measure in the days prior to Donald J. Trump's inauguration, in Washington, U.S., January 15, 2017. REUTERS/Mike Theiler
The U.S. Capitol is seen during a rehearsal for the inauguration ceremony of U.S. President-elect Donald Trump in Washington, U.S., January 15, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
A military band passes stand-ins for President-elect Donald Trump, and his wife Melania (L) and Vice President-elect Mike Pence and his wife Karen (R) during a rehearsal for the inauguration on the East Front of the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S. January 15, 2017. From L-R are SGM Gregory Lowery, SPC Sara Corry, Maj. Gen. Bradley Becker, MSG Neil Ewachiw and MSG Leigh Ann Hinton. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Workmen prepare scaffolding and speakers at the Lincoln Memorial for pre-inaugural programs and festivities in the days prior to Donald J. Trump's inauguration, in Washington, U.S., January 15, 2017. REUTERS/Mike Theiler
Workmen arrive amid scaffolding and speakers at the Lincoln Memorial for pre-inaugural programs and festivities in the days prior to Donald J. Trump's inauguration, in Washington, U.S., January 15, 2017. REUTERS/Mike Theiler
A construction worker walks by a reviewing stand for the upcoming presidential inauguration outside of the White House in Washington, U.S., January 15, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
A reviewing stand is seen outside of the White House for the upcoming presidential inauguration in Washington, U.S., January 15, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
A stand-in for President-elect Donald Trump arrives to attend a rehearsal of the inauguration at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S. January 15, 2017. Army SGM Gregory Lowery is the stand-in for Donald J. Trump. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
Members of the U.S. military practice marching for the upcoming Inaugural Parade, on Pennsylvania Avenue near the White House, which will take place after Donald J. Trump is sworn in, in Washington, U.S., January 15, 2017. REUTERS/Mike Theiler
A construction worker is seen at the U.S. Capitol during a rehearsal for the inauguration ceremony of U.S. President-elect Donald Trump in Washington, U.S., January 15, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
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Concerns surrounding who pays for the presidential security in the nation's capital have grown in recent weeks as President Donald Trump looks to use the annual July 4th festivities on the National Mall, which draws tens of thousands of spectators, to make a speech.

The D.C. government normally assists the National Park Service with July 4 security, which would need to be bolstered because of the president's presence as well as a possible influx of protestors.

D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser's office did not immediately respond for comment but her chief of staff John Falcicchio told the Washington Post "all that we ask of our federal partners is continued cooperation and the resources to carry out these activities.” (Reporting by Valerie Volcovici, Editing by Franklin Paul)

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