AOC and Ted Cruz find common ground on lobbying ban

Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Tex., and Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., occupy opposite ends of the political spectrum, but on Thursday Cruz found himself — to his own surprise — agreeing with her on an issue most often associated with progressives: whether members of Congress should be allowed to become lobbyists when they leave office.

“I don’t think it should be legal at ALL to become a corporate lobbyist if you’ve served in Congress,” Ocasio-Cortez said in a tweet, adding that there should at least be a long waiting period.

Cruz responded about an hour later to Ocasio-Cortez’s tweet saying he agrees with the congresswoman.

“Here’s something I don’t say often: on this point, I AGREE with @AOC. Indeed, I have long called for a LIFETIME BAN on former Members of Congress becoming lobbyists,” Cruz said in his tweet. “The Swamp would hate it, but perhaps a chance for some bipartisan cooperation?”

14 PHOTOS
Ted Cruz and Donald Trumps love/hate relationship
See Gallery
Ted Cruz and Donald Trumps love/hate relationship
Republican U.S. presidential candidate Ted Cruz challenges rival Donald Trump (L) about releasing his tax returns during the debate sponsored by CNN for the 2016 Republican U.S. presidential candidates in Houston, Texas, February 25, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Stone
U.S. Republican presidential candidate Ted Cruz (R-TX) speaks with supporters of fellow candidate Donald Trump during a campaign event at The Mill in Marion, Indiana, U.S., May 2, 2016. REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein
Republican U.S. presidential candidate Donald Trump shows off the size of his hands as rivals Marco Rubio (L), Ted Cruz (2nd R) and John Kasich (R) look on at the start of the U.S. Republican presidential candidates debate in Detroit, Michigan, U.S., March 3, 2016. REUTERS/Jim Young/File Photo
Republican U.S. presidential candidates Donald Trump (L) and Ted Cruz shake hands at the start of the Republican candidates debate sponsored by CNN at the University of Miami in Miami, Florida, March 10, 2016. REUTERS/Joe Skipper
U.S. Senator Ted Cruz (R-TX) (R) greets businessman Donald Trump onstage as they address a Tea Party rally against the Iran nuclear deal at the U.S. Capitol in Washington September 9, 2015. Both Cruz and Trump are U.S. Republican presidential candidates. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
A delegate holds a sign that call for Ted Cruz delegates to support Donald Trump at the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S. July 20, 2016. REUTERS/Jim Young
Republican U.S. presidential candidate Donald Trump (L) talks with rival candidate Ted Cruz during a commercial break in the midst of the Republican U.S. presidential candidates debate sponsored by CNN at the University of Miami in Miami, Florida March 10, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Jim Stryker, of San Francisco, holds a sign in protest of Republican U.S. presidential candidate Ted Cruz during the California GOP convention in Burlingame, California, U.S., April 30, 2016. REUTERS/Stephen Lam
Republican U.S. presidential candidate Ted Cruz gestures over at rival candidate Donald Trump (L) at the U.S. Republican presidential candidates debate in Detroit, Michigan, March 3, 2016. REUTERS/Jim Young
Republican U.S. presidential candidates Donald Trump (L) and Ted Cruz (R) speak at the debate sponsored by CNN for the 2016 Republican U.S. presidential candidates in Houston, Texas, February 25, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Stone
A supporter holds up a sign with an error as U.S. Republican presidential candidate Ted Cruz speaks at a campaign event in Syracuse, New York April 15, 2016. REUTERS/Carlo Allegri
Former Republican U.S. presidential candidate and Texas Senator Ted Cruz speaks during the third session of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S. July 20, 2016. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
Protesters stand outside the Town & Country Resort where Republican presidential candidate Ted Cruz is speaking at a rally in San Diego, California, United States, April 11, 2016. REUTERS/Mike Blake
Heidi Cruz, wife of Republican U.S. presidential candidate Senator Ted Cruz, bites her lip and closes her eyes as she listens to her husband drop out of the race for the 2016 Republican presidential nomination during his Indiana primary night rally in Indianapolis, Indiana, U.S., May 3, 2016. REUTERS/Chris Bergin
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

Ocasio-Cortez responded to Cruz, saying “If you’re serious about a clean bill, then I’m down. Let’s make a deal.” She added that she would co-lead the bill with Cruz if there are “no partisan snuck-in clauses, no poison pills, etc.”

Ocasio-Cortez’s original tweet was made in response to a post from Public Citizen, a progressive consumer rights advocacy group, that stated about 60 percent of former members of the 115th Congress have taken jobs as lobbyists. The 115th Congress began in 2017 and ended in January 2019.

Among the politicians-turned-lobbyists are former Rep. Joe Crowley, D-N.Y., the long-time incumbent Ocasio-Cortez defeated in 2018. Crowley now works for the lobbying firm Squire Patton Boggs, with the firm touting his previous position as the fourth-ranking Democrat in the House.

Ocasio-Cortez, whose district includes the Bronx, is often the focus of attacks from conservatives for her progressive policies, including the Green New Deal. But some of her ideas have gotten support across the aisle.

Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson, a Republican, told Bloomberg in a recent interview that he supported Ocasio-Cortez’s push to end “one strike” rules that lead to the eviction of public housing tenants for minor drug offenses.

“She’s interested in people with criminal records being able to get housing. Well, so are we,” Carson said.

Responding to a clip of the interview with Carson, Ocasio-Cortez observed that bipartisanship is seen as either something only moderates can do or as a feat requiring someone to give up their principles.

She added that you don’t have to abandon your principles to find common ground with political opponents.Being curious about other people’s values helps.

Last week, Ocasio-Cortez recognized another rare moment of bipartisan unity after she and Rep. Mark Meadows, R-N.C., agreed that Congress needs to place restrictions on the surveillance of Americans. The agreement came after a House Oversight Committee hearing on facial recognition technology, during which witnesses said there were no federal regulations on the technology.

Ocasio-Cortez said in a tweet after the May 22 hearing that she was checking the sky for a flying pig because she agreed with Meadows and members of his conservative Freedom Caucus on the issue. Meadows did not respond publicly to Ocasio-Cortez’s tweet.

_____

Read more from Yahoo News:

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.