'There’s a danger here': Trump warns Democrats about impeachment

In a Rose Garden appearance Wednesday, President Trump warned Democrats not to pursue impeachment proceedings against him.

“There’s a danger here,” said Trump. “If someday a Democrat becomes president and you have a Republican House, they can impeach him for any reason, or her. Any reason. We can’t allow that to happen. We can’t allow it to happen.”

Trump was responding to a growing push from House Democrats to begin an impeachment inquiry into his administration after numerous executive branch officials, including former White House counsel Don McGahn and Attorney General William Barr, have declined to testify. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has attempted to tamp down her caucus’s push for impeachment hearings, citing the ongoing investigations.

SEE ALSO: Pelosi says Trump 'is engaged in a cover-up' — drawing his fury

But earlier in the day she charged that the White House was engaged in a “cover-up.”

“We believe no one is above the law, including the president of the United States,” said Pelosi, adding that committees would continue to fight Trump “to get the truth and facts for the American people.”

Trump’s warning that a Republican Congress could impeach a future Democratic president “for any reason” has some basis in history. The last president to face impeachment was a Democrat, Bill Clinton, who was charged with lying about a sexual encounter with a White House intern.

Trump said he walked into a White House meeting with congressional Democrats that was supposed to be about infrastructure funding and informed Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer that he wanted to “do infrastructure” but not while he’s facing congressional investigations.

Trump, who declined to be interviewed for special counsel Robert Mueller’s probe, insisted he cooperated fully with the investigation nevertheless.

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William Barr announces Mueller report release
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William Barr announces Mueller report release
Attorney General William Barr speaks alongside Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, right, and acting Principal Associate Deputy Attorney General Edward O'Callaghan, left, about the release of a redacted version of special counsel Robert Mueller's report during a news conference, Thursday, April 18, 2019, at the Department of Justice in Washington. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
Special counsel Robert Mueller's report, with redactions, as released on Thursday, April 18, 2019, is photographed in Washington. (AP Photo/Jon Elswick)
Four pages of special counsel Robert Mueller report on the witness table in the House Intelligence Committee hearing room on Capitol Hill, in Washington, Thursday, April 18, 2019.. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)
Special counsel Robert Mueller's redacted report on Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election as released on Thursday, April 18, 2019, is photographed in Washington. (AP Photo/Jon Elswick)
Attorney General William Barr speaks alongside Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, right, and acting Principal Associate Deputy Attorney General Edward O’Callaghan, left, about the release of a redacted version of special counsel Robert Mueller's report during a news conference, Thursday, April 18, 2019, at the Department of Justice in Washington. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
Attorney General William Barr speaks alongside Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, right, about the release of a redacted version of special counsel Robert Mueller's report during a news conference, Thursday, April 18, 2019, at the Department of Justice in Washington. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
The four page letter from Attorney General William Barr regarding special counsel Robert Mueller's redacted report is photographed Thursday, April 18, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo/Jon Elswick)
Special Counsel Robert Mueller's redacted report that includes written answers from President Donald Trump as released on Thursday, April 18, 2019, is photographed in Washington. (AP Photo/Jon Elswick)
Special Counsel Robert Mueller's redacted report that includes written answers from President Donald Trump as released on Thursday, April 18, 2019, is photographed in Washington. (AP Photo/Jon Elswick)
Photojournalists photograph four pages of report by special counsel Robert Mueller on the witness table in the House Intelligence Committee hearing room on Capitol Hill, in Washington, Thursday, April 18, 2019. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)
UNSPECIFIED - In this screenshot taken from the U.S. Department of Justice website, a page from the Mueller Report is seen on April 18, 2019. (Photo by Getty Images)
UNSPECIFIED - In this screenshot taken from the U.S. Department of Justice website, a redacted page from the Mueller Report is seen on April 18, 2019. (Photo by Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - APRIL 18: The gavel of chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., is seen as media films a few pages of special counsel Robert Mueller's report on Russian interference in the 2016 election which was printed out by staff in the House Judiciary Committee's hearing room on Thursday, April 18, 2019. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
UNITED STATES - APRIL 18: Attorney General William Barr appears on a television in the Capitol subway to Rayburn building while conducting a news conference at the Justice Department on special counsel Robert Mueller's report on Russian interference in the 2016 election on Thursday, April 18, 2019. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 18: TV crews work outside of the Senate Judiciary Committee's office on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. on April 18, 2019. Today the Department of Justice released special counsel Robert Mueller’s redacted report on Russian election interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election. (Photo by Zach Gibson/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 18: TV crews work outside of the Senate Judiciary Committee's office on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. on April 18, 2019. Today the Department of Justice released special counsel Robert Mueller’s redacted report on Russian election interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election. (Photo by Zach Gibson/Getty Images)
A photo illustration dated April 18, 2019 in Washington, DC shows an editor looking at a photograph of US Attorney General William Barr (L) speaking about the release of the redacted version of the Mueller report, juxtaposed with US President Donald Trump's latest tweet (R) 'Game Over,' using a 'Game of Thrones' style montage that pictures him standing in dramatic fog. - Trump, backed by his attorney general, declared himself fully vindicated Thursday in the investigation into Russian election meddling and alleged collusion with his campaign -- even before the American people and lawmakers see the full probe report. (Photo by Eva HAMBACH / AFP) (Photo credit should read EVA HAMBACH/AFP/Getty Images)
William Barr, U.S. attorney general, center, speaks as Rod Rosenstein, deputy attorney general, right, and Ed O'Callaghan, principal deputy assistant Attorney General, listen during a news conference at the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, April 18, 2019. Barr is set to release a redacted version of Special Counsel Robert Mueller's final report today, and the document could leave everyone unsatisfied, President Donald Trump, lawmakers and the public. Photographer: Erik Lesser/Pool via Bloomberg
William Barr, U.S. attorney general, left, speaks as Rod Rosenstein, deputy attorney general, listens during a news conference at the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Thursday, April 18, 2019. Barr is set to release a redacted version of Special Counsel Robert Mueller's final report today, and the document could leave everyone unsatisfied, President Donald Trump, lawmakers and the public. Photographer: Erik Lesser/Pool via Bloomberg
US Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein (R) listens while Attorney General William Barr speaks during a press conference about the release of the Mueller Report at the Department of Justice April 18, 2019, in Washington, DC. - US Attorney General Bill Barr said Thursday that the White House fully cooperated with Special Counsel Robert Mueller's probe of Russian election meddling and that President Donald Trump took no action to thwart the probe. 'There is substantial evidence to show that the president was frustrated and angered by a sincere belief that the investigation was undermining his presidency, propelled by his political opponents, and fueled by illegal leaks,' Barr said ahead of the release of the Mueller report. (Photo by Brendan Smialowski / AFP) (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
US Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein (R) listens while Attorney General William Barr speaks during a press conference about the release of the Mueller Report at the Department of Justice April 18, 2019, in Washington, DC. - US Attorney General Bill Barr said Thursday that the White House fully cooperated with Special Counsel Robert Mueller's probe of Russian election meddling and that President Donald Trump took no action to thwart the probe. 'There is substantial evidence to show that the president was frustrated and angered by a sincere belief that the investigation was undermining his presidency, propelled by his political opponents, and fueled by illegal leaks,' Barr said ahead of the release of the Mueller report. (Photo by Brendan Smialowski / AFP) (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
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“I don’t do cover-ups. You people know that probably better than anybody,” said Trump, addressing reporters.

Michael Cohen, Trump’s former personal attorney — currently serving a three-year prison sentence — has said he made a payoff to actress Stormy Daniels, at Trump’s direction, to cover up what she said was a sexual encounter with the president.

Trump decried the cost of the Mueller investigation, which a large sign at the podium put at “$35+ Million.” By other calculations, the investigation actually represented a net profit for the Treasury, factoring in the forfeit of assets by former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort.

After Trump’s Rose Garden comments, Pelosi spoke to reporters and denounced the president for his refusal to work with Congress on an infrastructure bill, adding, “In any event, I pray for the president of the United States, and I pray for the United States of America.”

While most of the Republican Party has closed ranks around Trump, Rep. Justin Amash, R-Mich., came out in support of impeachment proceedings over the weekend. Amash, a libertarian who came to Congress in the Tea Party wave of 2010, said there was enough evidence in the special counsel’s report to begin a congressional investigation of the president. Trump replied by calling the five-term representative a “loser” and “total lightweight.”

Rep. Mary Gay Scanlon, D-Pa., vice chair of the House Judiciary Committee, said in a statement Monday that "the time has come to start an impeachment inquiry."

“Congress has patiently tried to work within traditional means to get to the bottom of this extraordinary situation," Scanlon said. "But we have reached an inflection point."

SEE ALSO: More House Dems come out for impeachment as McGahn defies subpoena

Freshmen Democrats have been pushing for impeachment since beginning their tenure. Shortly after being sworn in in January, Rep. Rashida Tlaib, D-Mich., said, “We’re going to impeach the motherf***er.” Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., told Yahoo News in April that she was in favor of the process.

“It is just as politicized a maneuver to not impeach in the face of overwhelming evidence as it is to impeach w/o cause,” wrote Ocasio-Cortez on Twitter Tuesday. “Congress swore an oath to uphold the Constitution. That includes impeachment. We have a duty to preserve our institutions + uphold the rule of law.”

An article of impeachment being passed by the House would not end Trump’s presidency but would lead to a trial in the Republican-controlled Senate and a vote on whether to remove the president from office.

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