Poll finds wide support for Mueller and McGahn to testify in Congress

By a large majority, Americans want special counsel Robert Mueller and former White House counsel Don McGahn to testify before Congress, according to a Monmouth University poll released Wednesday.

Seventy-three percent of those surveyed said that Mueller should appear before Congress to answer questions about his investigation into the Trump campaign’s ties to Russia in the 2016 presidential election.

As for McGahn, 67 percent of those surveyed said he should testify about the answers he provided for Mueller’s report. That number included a majority of Democrats (90 percent) and independents (65 percent) and a plurality of Republicans (41 percent, compared with 38 percent who disagreed).

Mueller has been in negotiations with Democrats on the House Judiciary Committee, as well as with Justice Department officials, about when he might testify and the ground rules for his appearance.

President Trump, meanwhile, has directed McGahn to ignore a subpoena from House Democrats to appear for further questioning, setting up a battle that threatens to grind government to a halt.

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White House Counsel Don McGahn speaks at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) at National Harbor, Maryland, U.S., February 22, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 13: U.S. White House Counsel Don McGahn after the investiture ceremony for U.S. District Judge Trevor N. McFadden April 13, 2018 at the U.S. District Court in Washington, DC. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - FEBRUARY 01: Rob Porter, right, White House staff secretary, and Don McGahn, White House counsel, attend a luncheon featuring a speech by President Donald Trump at the House and Senate Republican retreat at The Greenbrier resort in White Sulphur Springs, W.Va., on February 1, 2018. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 13: U.S. White House Counsel Don McGahn (R) talks to acting U.S. Associate Attorney General Jesse Panuccio (L) after the investiture ceremony for U.S. District Judge Trevor N. McFadden April 13, 2018 at the U.S. District Court in Washington, DC. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - NOVEMBER 15: Don McGahn, general counsel for the Trump transition team, gets into an elevator in the lobby at Trump Tower, November 15, 2016 in New York City. President-elect Donald Trump is in the process of choosing his presidential cabinet as he transitions from a candidate to the president-elect. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 13: U.S. White House Counsel Don McGahn after the investiture ceremony for U.S. District Judge Trevor N. McFadden April 13, 2018 at the U.S. District Court in Washington, DC. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
White House Counsel Don McGahn speaks at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) at National Harbor, Maryland, U.S., February 22, 2018. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque
NATIONAL HARBOR, MD - FEBRUARY 22: White House Counsel Don McGahn speaks during CPAC 2018 February 22, 2018 in National Harbor, Maryland. The American Conservative Union hosted its annual Conservative Political Action Conference to discuss conservative agenda. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - APRIL 7: Vice President Mike Pence and White House counsel Don McGahn, arrive in the Capitol on the day the Senate voted to confirm Neil Gorsuch as the next Supreme Court justice, April 7, 2017. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
American campaign finance lawyer Donald McGahn II takes the elevator at Trump Tower January 14, 2017 in New York / AFP / DON EMMERT (Photo credit should read DON EMMERT/AFP/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - JANUARY 20: Don McGahn, White House counsel to President Donald J. Trump, is seen on the West Front of the Capitol after Trump was sworn in as the 45th President of the United States, January 20, 2017. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
White House Counsel Don McGahn speaks during the 2018 Conservative Political Action Conference in Oxon Hill, Maryland, on February 22, 2018. / AFP PHOTO / JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
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On Wednesday, Trump did just that, walking out of a scheduled meeting with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., over continued congressional oversight of the Mueller investigation.

“You can't do it under these circumstances,” Trump said in a Rose Garden appearance convened shortly after he stormed out of his meeting with Pelosi and Schumer. “Get these phony investigations over with.”

Trump said he was angered after seeing Pelosi tell Capitol Hill reporters that she thought he was “engaged in a cover-up.”

"We do believe that it's important to follow the facts," Pelosi said. "We believe that no one is above the law, including the president of the United States. And we believe that the president of the United States is engaged in a cover-up."

Following his own remarks to reporters, the president retreated to Twitter to continue his train of thought. “You can’t investigate and legislate simultaneously — it just doesn’t work that way,” Trump wrote.

But the Monmouth poll found that Americans were not yet ready to turn the page on Mueller’s investigation, with 69 percent indicating they believed Congress was entitled to receive a full version of the special counsel’s report. Just 21 percent said that the version redacted by Attorney General William Barr was sufficient.

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