Connecticut baseball diamond set on fire in foolish effort to dry out field

A poorly thought-out plan to dry out a baseball infield has turned into a costly burden for one town in Connecticut. 

Last Saturday, a group of people attempted to dry out the basepath at Ciuccoli Field in Ridgefield by unloading 25 gallons of gasoline on it, according to the NewsTimes. The field, where Ridgefield High School's baseball team was set to play its home game that morning, was then set on fire.

"Someone had [the] idea to put gas on the surface," First Selectman Rudy Marconi told the newspaper. "Let it burn to dry up the water and make the field playable." 

The damage will cost upwards of $50,000 to fix, Marconi added. By Sunday afternoon, between six and eight inches of gas-soaked soil were removed from the field. 

"I'm not aware of who exactly it was who got the gas, but what we do know is that someone did use some gas around third base and that seemed to work," Marconi said. "Others then went to get more gas and began spreading it from second over to the third." 

Several members of the state's Department of Energy and Environment Protection worked with Pete Hill, director of Ridgefield Public Works, to find an appropriate excavator. The removal process started Saturday night and ended at midnight before it was finally completed Sunday afternoon. 

A police investigation is underway, but Marconi pointed out that there were between 75 and 100 witnesses to the incident. Police could not say whether students were involved.

RELATED: See aerial images of last year's devastating wildfires in California: 

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Aerial images of California's devastating wildfires
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Aerial images of California's devastating wildfires
TOPSHOT - In this aerial photo, a burned neighborhood is seen in Paradise, California on November 15, 2018. - The toll in the deadliest wildfires in recent California history climbed to 59 on November 14, 2018, as authorities released a list of 130 people still missing. (Photo by Josh Edelson / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOSH EDELSON/AFP/Getty Images)
Fires burn toward the Pacific Ocean as seen Friday, Nov. 9, 2018, over Santa Monica, Calif. Flames driven by powerful winds torched dozens of hillside homes in Southern California, burning parts of tony Calabasas and mansions in Malibu and forcing tens of thousands of people — including some celebrities — to flee as the fire marched across the Santa Monica Mountains toward the sea. The cause of the blazes was not known. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)
TOPSHOT - In this aerial photo, a burned neighborhood is seen in Paradise, California on November 15, 2018. - The toll in the deadliest wildfires in recent California history climbed to 59 on November 14, 2018, as authorities released a list of 130 people still missing. (Photo by Josh Edelson / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOSH EDELSON/AFP/Getty Images)
In this aerial photo, a burned neighborhood is seen in Paradise, California on November 15, 2018. - The toll in the deadliest wildfires in recent California history climbed to 59 on November 14, 2018, as authorities released a list of 130 people still missing. (Photo by Josh Edelson / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOSH EDELSON/AFP/Getty Images)
A DC-10 air tanker flies over homes as fires burn Friday, Nov. 9, 2018, as seen from a helicopter over the Calabasas section of Los Angeles. Flames driven by powerful winds torched dozens of hillside homes in Southern California, burning parts of tony Calabasas and mansions in Malibu and forcing tens of thousands of people — including some celebrities — to flee as the fire marched across the Santa Monica Mountains toward the sea. The cause of the blazes was not known. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)
In this aerial photo, a burned neighborhood is seen in Paradise, California on November 15, 2018. - The toll in the deadliest wildfires in recent California history climbed to 59 on November 14, 2018, as authorities released a list of 130 people still missing. (Photo by Josh Edelson / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOSH EDELSON/AFP/Getty Images)
A home burns Friday, Nov. 9, 2018, as seen from a helicopter in the Calabasas section of Los Angeles. Flames driven by powerful winds torched dozens of hillside homes in Southern California, burning parts of tony Calabasas and mansions in Malibu and forcing tens of thousands of people — including some celebrities — to flee as the fire marched across the Santa Monica Mountains toward the sea. The cause of the blazes was not known. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)
In this aerial photo, a burned neighborhood is seen in Paradise, California, on November 15, 2018. - The toll in the deadliest wildfires in recent California history climbed to 59 on November 14, 2018, as authorities released a list of 130 people still missing. (Photo by Josh Edelson / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOSH EDELSON/AFP/Getty Images)
Fires burn toward the Pacific Ocean Friday, Nov. 9, 2018, as seen from a helicopter over Simi Valley, Calif. Flames driven by powerful winds torched dozens of hillside homes in Southern California, burning parts of tony Calabasas and mansions in Malibu and forcing tens of thousands of people — including some celebrities — to flee as the fire marched across the Santa Monica Mountains toward the sea. The cause of the blazes was not known. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)
In this aerial photo, a burned neighborhood is seen in Paradise, California on November 15, 2018. - The toll in the deadliest wildfires in recent California history climbed to 59 on November 14, 2018, as authorities released a list of 130 people still missing. (Photo by Josh Edelson / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOSH EDELSON/AFP/Getty Images)
In this aerial photo, a burned neighborhood is seen in Paradise, California, on November 15, 2018. - The toll in the deadliest wildfires in recent California history climbed to 59 on November 14, 2018, as authorities released a list of 130 people still missing. (Photo by Josh Edelson / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOSH EDELSON/AFP/Getty Images)
An air tanker gets ready to drop flame retardant to protect homes as fires burn Friday, Nov. 9, 2018, seen from a helicopter over the Calabasas section of Los Angeles. Flames driven by powerful winds torched dozens of hillside homes in Southern California, burning parts of tony Calabasas and mansions in Malibu and forcing tens of thousands of people — including some celebrities — to flee as the fire marched across the Santa Monica Mountains toward the sea. The cause of the blazes was not known. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)
TOPSHOT - In this aerial photo, a burned neighborhood is seen in Paradise, California on November 15, 2018. - The toll in the deadliest wildfires in recent California history climbed to 59 on November 14, 2018, as authorities released a list of 130 people still missing. (Photo by Josh Edelson / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOSH EDELSON/AFP/Getty Images)
An air tanker gets ready to drop flame retardant to protect multimillion dollar homes from fires Friday, Nov. 9, 2018, as seen from a helicopter over the Calabasas section of Los Angeles. Flames driven by powerful winds torched dozens of hillside homes in Southern California, burning parts of tony Calabasas and mansions in Malibu and forcing tens of thousands of people — including some celebrities — to flee as the fire marched across the Santa Monica Mountains toward the sea. The cause of the blazes was not known. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)
In this aerial photo, a burned neighborhood is seen in Paradise, California on November 15, 2018. - The toll in the deadliest wildfires in recent California history climbed to 59 on November 14, 2018, as authorities released a list of 130 people still missing. (Photo by Josh Edelson / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOSH EDELSON/AFP/Getty Images)
TOPSHOT - In this aerial photo, a burned neighborhood is seen in Paradise, California, on November 15, 2018. - The toll in the deadliest wildfires in recent California history climbed to 59 on November 14, 2018, as authorities released a list of 130 people still missing. (Photo by Josh Edelson / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOSH EDELSON/AFP/Getty Images)
Fires burn Friday, Nov. 9, 2018, as seen from a helicopter over the Calabasas section of Los Angeles. Flames driven by powerful winds torched dozens of hillside homes in Southern California, burning parts of tony Calabasas and mansions in Malibu and forcing tens of thousands of people — including some celebrities — to flee as the fire marched across the Santa Monica Mountains toward the sea. The cause of the blazes was not known. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)
In this aerial photo, a burned neighborhood is seen in Paradise, California on November 15, 2018. - The toll in the deadliest wildfires in recent California history climbed to 59 on November 14, 2018, as authorities released a list of 130 people still missing. (Photo by Josh Edelson / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOSH EDELSON/AFP/Getty Images)
Fires burn toward the Pacific Ocean as seen Friday, Nov. 9, 2018, over Santa Monica, Calif. Flames driven by powerful winds torched dozens of hillside homes in Southern California, burning parts of tony Calabasas and mansions in Malibu and forcing tens of thousands of people — including some celebrities — to flee as the fire marched across the Santa Monica Mountains toward the sea. The cause of the blazes was not known. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)
In this aerial photo, a burned neighborhood is seen in Paradise, California on November 15, 2018. - The toll in the deadliest wildfires in recent California history climbed to 59 on November 14, 2018, as authorities released a list of 130 people still missing. (Photo by Josh Edelson / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOSH EDELSON/AFP/Getty Images)
In this aerial photo, a burned neighborhood is seen in Paradise, California on November 15, 2018. - The toll in the deadliest wildfires in recent California history climbed to 59 on November 14, 2018, as authorities released a list of 130 people still missing. (Photo by Josh Edelson / AFP) (Photo credit should read JOSH EDELSON/AFP/Getty Images)
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"The [Ridgefield Police Department] is attempting to get all of the facts and circumstances of this incident," Capt. Shawn Platt told the NewsTimes on Monday. "It would be irresponsible of the [department] to release any information that is not confirmed as true." 

Earlier last week, a Utah high school baseball coach was placed on administrative leave after he supposedly poured unleaded gasoline and diesel fuel on a field to dry up wet areas, according to ABC4 News. A parent complained about the smell, leading to an investigation. 

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