Trump adviser Stephen Miller reportedly informal border czar

  • According to multiple reports, White House adviser Stephen Miller orchestrated a hardline shakeup of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS).
  • DHS secretary Kirstjen Nielsen unexpectedly announced her resignation Sunday, with President Trump reportedly concerned that she had not taken tough enough stances.
  • The president, in a meeting of officials in the Oval Office last week, told Miller he was in charge of all immigration and border affairs, reported the Washington Post.
  • With border crossings at an 11-year high, the Trump administration has renewed attempts to crack down on migration from Mexico.
  • Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.

US border and immigration policy is now reportedly under the control of one of the most notorious anti-immigration hardliners in the Trump administration, following the surprise departure of Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen.

On Sunday Politico reported that Miller was behind a government-wide bid to tighten migration policy. The site said he lobbied for the replacement of government officials with those who share his views, and telephoned mid-ranking officials at several government departments to angrily demand that they do more the halt the movement of illegal migrants into the country.

"There’s definitely a larger shakeup abreast being led by Stephen Miller and the staunch right wing within the administration," a person close to Nielsen told the publication. "They failed with the courts and with Congress and now they’re eating their own."

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Stephen Miller in his White House role
Senior advisor Stephen Miller attends a meeting between U.S. President Donald Trump and congressional leaders to discuss trade deals at the at the Roosevelt room of the White House in Washington U.S., February 2, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
Senior advisor Stephen Miller (L) and Senior advisor and son-in-law of U.S. President Donald Trump, Jared Kushner (R) attend a breakfast meeting with small business leaders hosted by Trump at the Roosevelt room of the White House in Washington U.S., January 30, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
White House speech writer Stephen Miller (L) and advisor Jared Kushner (2nd L) join President Donald Trump at a meeting with U.S. congressional leaders in the State Dining Room at the White House in Washington, U.S. January 23, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
U.S. President Donald Trump's top White House staff, including (L-R) Chief of Staff Reince Priebus, National Security Advisor Michael Flynn, Chief Strategist Steve Bannon and Senior Advisors Stephen Miller and Jared Kushner, enter the East Room to attend a joint news conference being held by President Trump and British Prime Minister Theresa May at the White House in Washington, U.S., January 27, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
White House counselor Kellyanne Conway and Senior Advisor Stephen Miller (R) walk along the colonnade ahead of a joint press conference by Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and U.S. President Donald Trump at the White House in Washington, U.S., February 10, 2017. REUTERS/Jim Bourg
U.S. Representative Steny Hoyer (D-MD) (L-R), House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-CA), White House advisor Jared Kushner, House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-WI), WHite House speech writer Stephen Miller, Representative Kevin McCarthy (R-CA), Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) and Senator John Cornyn (R-TX) wait for President Donald Trump to arrive for a reception and meeting with U.S. congressional leaders in the State Dining Room at the White House in Washington, U.S. January 23, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Senior White House Advisor Stephen Miller waits to go on the air in the White House Briefing Room in Washington, U.S., February 12, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer removes lint from Senior White House Advisor Stephen Miller's jacket as he waits to go on the air in the White House Briefing Room in Washington, U.S., February 12, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Senior White House Advisor Stephen Miller waits to go on the air in the White House Briefing Room in Washington, U.S., February 12, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
White House senior advisors Stephen Miller (C) and Kellyanne Conway arrive prior to a joint news conference between Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and U.S. President Donald Trump at the White House in Washington, U.S., February 13, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
White House Senior Advisor Stephen Miller takes the president's notes from a White House military aide after a joint news conference between U.S. President Donald Trump and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, at the White House in Washington, U.S., February 15, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
White House Chief Strategist Steve Bannon (C) arrives with Senior Advisor Stephen Miller (L) and Chief of Staff Reince Priebus for a news conference by U.S. President Donald Trump at the White House in Washington, U.S., February 16, 2017. REUTERS/Carlos Barria
White House advisors Stephen Miller (L) and Steve Bannon (R) arrive aboard Air Force One, returning to Washington with U.S. President Donald Trump from a weekend in Florida, at Joint Base Andrews, Maryland, U.S. March 5, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Senior advisors Stephen Miller and Kellyanne Conway watch as German Chancellor Angela Merkel and U.S. President Donald Trump hold a joint news conference in the East Room of the White House in Washington, U.S., March 17, 2017. REUTERS/Jim Bourg
White House Senior Adviser Stephen Miller arrives to attend a joint news conference by German Chancellor Angela Merkel and U.S. President Donald Trump in the East Room of the White House in Washington, U.S., March 17, 2017. REUTERS/Jim Bourg
White House senior policy advisor Stephen Miller (R) joins Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders to discuss U.S. immigration policy at the daily briefing at the White House in Washington, U.S. August 2, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
White House senior policy advisor Stephen Miller (R) joins Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders to discuss U.S. immigration policy at the daily briefing at the White House in Washington, U.S. August 2, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
White House senior policy advisor Stephen Miller discusses U.S. immigration policy at the daily press briefing at the White House in Washington, U.S. August 2, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
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CBS News also reported that Miller was behind the planned overhaul of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), where Trump reportedly didn't believe outgoing secretary Nielsen shared his anti-migration stance. 

With border crossings at an 11-year high, the Trump administration is doubling down on its pledge to stop migrants crossing the United States border without permission. 

Nielsen's resignation came two days after Trump unexpectedly withdrew his own nomination to head the Immigration and Customs Agency (ICE), Ronald Vitiello, claiming he wanted someone "tougher" in the role.

Miller has, according to administration officials cited in the Washington Post, been a staunch critic of the nominee, with Trump’s decision to ditch him seen as a sign of the 33-year-old adviser's expanding influence.

The president, in a recent Oval Office meeting, even told Miller he would be in charge of handling all immigration and border affairs, according to the Post.

The outlet said Miller had recently encouraged the president to take a more confrontational approach with Mexico, and supports his threat to close the US-Mexico border.

Miller has long been regarded as one of the strongest anti-immigration voices in the administration, and the architect of the controversial child separation policy.

The policy saw the children of undocumented migrants separated from their parents at the border and held in detention facilities, in a policy that received widespread international and domestic condemnation.

In an email last week to the conservative Daily Caller website, Miller said there would be an "aggressive effort to utilize every existing authority in statute" to curb undocumented migration.  

Miller said the White House is "systematically reviewing all authorities that are already on the books, both in terms of cracking down on illegal immigration and […] the abuse of our legal immigration system."

NOW WATCH: Paul Manafort faces over 7 years in prison for conspiracy and obstruction. Here's what you need to know about Trump's former campaign chairman.

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