Mother sues school after autistic son was forced to wear fluorescent vest

A London woman has sued her son's school after claiming it made her 7-year-old son wear a fluorescent safety vest. 

Joanne Logan said Cherry Lane Primary School forced her son Charlie to wear a vest while on the playground last year so that teachers would know that he is autistic, according to the Daily Mirror

The friction between Logan and the school dates back to February 2018, when Logan said her son first revealed that teachers made him wear the bright yellow bib during breaks. 

"Looking back on it, I think the classroom teacher mentioned a bib during the week," Logan told the Daily Mirror last year. "But I didn't really think about it. It didn't really click until Charlie said something." 

In a video posted to YouTube by his mother, Charlie can be heard admitting the bib made him feel embarrassed.

"I was made to wear a yellow bib in the playground, and it felt really bad and it felt really wrong," he said.

Logan said Charlie's teachers did not always let him outside during breaks because he had been accused of hurting other children. However, she insists the school handled the situation inappropriately by making him wear the distinctive garment.

Following the incident, she and the school's headmaster agreed that Charlie would no longer have to wear it. 

Now, the mother of five children — all of whom are autistic — has taken the school to a disability tribunal. Logan claims the school discriminated against Charlie, who no longer attends Cherry Lane, by singling him out. 

"I just want to make sure that no other autistic child needs to be put through what we did and it needs to be challenged— and this case, if it's won, could change that," she said. 

RELATED: Check out this robot that helps children with autism: 

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Kaspar, a robot developed to improve the lives of children with autism
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Kaspar, a robot developed to improve the lives of children with autism
Harrison, 5, who is autistic, plays with Kaspar, a child-sized humanoid robot developed at the University of Hertfordshire to interact and help improve the lives of children with autism, in Stevenage, Britain January 30, 2017. REUTERS/Matthew Stock
LONDON, ENGLAND - NOVEMBER 29: Robotics PhD student Luke Wood works on KASPAR, a robot built at the University of Hertfordshire to help autistic children, in the Robotville exhibition at the Science Museum on November 29, 2011 in London, England. The Science Museum's Robotville exhibition showcases 20 unique and cutting-edge robots from European research laboratories, it is free to enter and runs from December 1-4, 2011. (Photo by Oli Scarff/Getty Images)
Dr. Ben Robins, Senior Research Fellow at the University of Hertfordshire, mediates while Harrison, 5, who is autistic, plays with Kaspar, a child-sized humanoid robot designed to interact and help improve the lives of children with autism, in Stevenage, Britain January 30, 2017. REUTERS/Matthew Stockman
Harrison, 5, who is autistic, plays with Kaspar, a child-sized humanoid robot developed at the University of Hertfordshire to interact and help improve the lives of children with autism, in Stevenage, Britain January 30, 2017. REUTERS/Matthew Stockman
Dr Mick Walters of the University of Hertfordshire looks at the University's KASPAR humanoid robot which is used to study human-robot interactions, one of the aims of which is to help autistic children. (Photo by Tim Ireland - PA Images/PA Images via Getty Images)
Harrison, 5, who is autistic, plays with Kaspar, a child-sized humanoid robot developed at the University of Hertfordshire to interact and help improve the lives of children with autism, in Stevenage, Britain January 30, 2017. REUTERS/Matthew Stockman
REPEATING CORRECTING TYPO IN BYLINE Kaspar, a child-sized humanoid robot developed at the University of Hertfordshire to interact and help improve the lives of children with autism is seen at the University of Hertfordshire, in Stevenage, Britain January 30, 2017. REUTERS/Matthew Stock
REPEATING CORRECTING TYPO IN BYLINE Dr. Ben Robins, Senior Research Fellow at the University of Hertfordshire, mediates while Harrison, 5, who is autistic, plays with Kaspar, a child-sized humanoid robot designed to interact and help improve the lives of children with autism, in Stevenage, Britain January 30, 2017. REUTERS/Matthew Stock
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Logan, who cannot seek any damages, said the school misled her when it first mentioned the vest. Cherry Lane is seeking to dismiss the case on the grounds that the claim was filed too late. The Daily Mirror's request for comment from the school was referred to Hillingdon London Borough Council, the school region's authority.

"There is no legal case against Hillingdon Council in relation to this or any disability discrimination," the statement read. "Ms. Logan has chosen to provide Elective Home Education for her son." 

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