Mark Zuckerberg ‘confident’ heading into 2020 election, but says Facebook must make defenses ‘stronger and stronger’

Mark Zuckerberg says in a new interview that he is "confident" that Facebook can thwart attempts at interference in the 2020 presidential election, but he could not make any assurances.

It has been found that Russian agents used Facebook and other social media platforms to reach millions of Americans during the contentious 2016 White House race won by Donald Trump.

“What I can guarantee is that they’re definitely going to try,” the Facebook CEO told George Stephanopoulos in an interview that aired on ABC News on Thursday.

“That’s what we’ve seen,” Zuckerberg added. “So our job is to make the defenses stronger and stronger, to make it harder for them to do what they’re doing and to build the right partnerships with other folks in the industry and in the intelligence community, so that way, together, we can get a good sense of what is going on out there and help keep this safe.”

He added that spending money on safety and security will be a priority heading into the next presidential election.

Zuckerberg touched on a variety of subjects during the “Good Morning America” interview, including the outrage over the livestreaming of the mass shootings in New Zealand that left 50 people dead.

19 PHOTOS
Protestors display cardboard cutouts of Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg outside U.S. Capitol
See Gallery
Protestors display cardboard cutouts of Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg outside U.S. Capitol
Avaaz.org Campaign Director Nell Greenberg, (L), walks among dozens of cardboard cut-outs of Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg while holding a protest outside of the U.S. Capitol building in Washington, U.S., April 10, 2018. REUTERS/Leah Millis
Dozens of cardboard cutouts of Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg are seen during an Avaaz.org protest outside the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S., April 10, 2018. REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein
Dozens of cardboard cut-outs of Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg sit outside of the U.S. Capitol Building as part of an Avaaz.org protest in Washington, U.S., April 10, 2018. REUTERS/Leah Millis
Dozens of cardboard cutouts of Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg are seen during an Avaaz.org protest outside the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S., April 10, 2018. REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein
Cutouts of Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg are displayed on the South East lawn of the Capitol building ahead of testimony before a joint hearing of the Senate Judiciary and Commerce Committees in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Tuesday, April 10, 2018. Lawmakers will grill Zuckerberg on issues ranging from the troves of data vacuumed up by app developers and political consultant Cambridge Analytica to Russian operatives' use of the social network to spread misinformation and discord during the 2016 U.S. presidential election. Photographer: Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Cutouts of Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg are displayed on the South East lawn of the Capitol building ahead of testimony before a joint hearing of the Senate Judiciary and Commerce Committees in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Tuesday, April 10, 2018. Lawmakers will grill Zuckerberg on issues ranging from the troves of data vacuumed up by app developers and political consultant Cambridge Analytica to Russian operatives' use of the social network to spread misinformation and discord during the 2016 U.S. presidential election. Photographer: Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Dozens of cardboard cutouts of Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg are seen during an Avaaz.org protest outside the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S., April 10, 2018. REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein
UNITED STATES - APRIL 10: Cutouts of Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg appear on the east lawn of the Capitol ahead of his testimony before a joint hearing of the Senate Judiciary and Commerce Committees on the protection of user data on April 10, 2018. Avaaz set up the display to call on Facebook to delete fake accounts. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
Dozens of cardboard cutouts of Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg are seen during an Avaaz.org protest outside the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S., April 10, 2018. REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein
WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 10: 100 life-sized cutouts of Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg sit on the lawn of the U.S. Capitol on April 10, 2018 in Washington, DC. The advocacy group Avaaz placed the cutouts on the lawn to bring attention to the alleged hundreds of millions of fake accounts still spreading disinformation on Facebook ahead of Zuckerberg's hearing before the Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation and Senate Judiciary Comittees. (Photo by Zach Gibson/Getty Images)
Dozens of cardboard cutouts of Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg are seen during an Avaaz.org protest outside the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S., April 10, 2018. REUTERS/Aaron P. Bernstein
Chelsea Hornick-Becker of Avaaz.org holds a protest sign in front of dozens of cardboard cut-outs of Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg outside of the U.S. Capitol Building in Washington, U.S., April 10, 2018. REUTERS/Leah Millis
Dozens of cardboard cut-outs of Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg sit outside of the U.S. Capitol Building as part of an Avaaz.org protest in Washington, U.S., April 10, 2018. REUTERS/Leah Millis
WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 10: 100 life-sized cutouts of Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg sit on the lawn of the U.S. Capitol on April 10, 2018 in Washington, DC. The advocacy group Avaaz placed the cutouts on the lawn to bring attention to the alleged hundreds of millions of fake accounts still spreading disinformation on Facebook ahead of Zuckerberg's hearing before the Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation and Senate Judiciary Comittees. (Photo by Zach Gibson/Getty Images)
One hundred cardboard cutouts of Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg stand outside the US Capitol in Washington, DC, April 10, 2018. Advocacy group Avaaz is calling attention to what the groups says are hundreds of millions of fake accounts still spreading disinformation on Facebook. / AFP PHOTO / SAUL LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
Cutouts of Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg are displayed on the South East lawn of the Capitol building ahead of testimony before a joint hearing of the Senate Judiciary and Commerce Committees in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Tuesday, April 10, 2018. Lawmakers will grill Zuckerberg on issues ranging from the troves of data vacuumed up by app developers and political consultant Cambridge Analytica to Russian operatives' use of the social network to spread misinformation and discord during the 2016 U.S. presidential election. Photographer: Al Drago/Bloomberg via Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 10: 100 life-sized cutouts of Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg sit on the lawn of the U.S. Capitol on April 10, 2018 in Washington, DC. The advocacy group Avaaz placed the cutouts on the lawn to bring attention to the alleged hundreds of millions of fake accounts still spreading disinformation on Facebook ahead of Zuckerberg's hearing before the Senate Commerce, Science, and Transportation and Senate Judiciary Comittees. (Photo by Zach Gibson/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - APRIL 10: Chelsea Hornick-Becker sets up a display of Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg cutouts on the east lawn of the Capitol ahead of his testimony before a joint hearing of the Senate Judiciary and Commerce Committees on the protection of user data on April 10, 2018. Avaaz set up the display to call on Facebook to delete fake accounts. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
One hundred cardboard cutouts of Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg stand outside the US Capitol in Washington, DC, April 10, 2018. Advocacy group Avaaz is calling attention to what the groups says are hundreds of millions of fake accounts still spreading disinformation on Facebook. / AFP PHOTO / SAUL LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

He said that a timed delay might have limited the views of the horrific shooting, but cautioned that it would also “fundamentally break what livestreaming is for people.”

“Most people are livestreaming, you know, a birthday party or hanging out with friends when they can’t be together,” Zuckerberg told ABC News. “It’s one of the things that’s magical about livestreaming is that it’s bi-directional, right? So you’re not just broadcasting. You’re communicating. And people are commenting back. So if you had a delay that would break that.”

He also said a planned independent oversight board with a “judicial structure” of about 40 people who will make decisions about content.

“If you’re in the community, if we take something down that you think is valid expression, you’re going to be able to appeal that to this oversight board. And they’re going to have the binding authority to make a decision,” he told Stephanopoulos.

Read Full Story

Sign up for Breaking News by AOL to get the latest breaking news alerts and updates delivered straight to your inbox.

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.