Samsung's new flower vase can be used to extinguish fires

South Korean tech giant Samsung has found an innovative — and beautiful — way to help people fight fires.

Developed by the company's subsidiary Cheil Worldwide, the Firevase is exactly what its name suggests — a flower vase that can be thrown at fires to extinguish them.

Made of translucent red glass, the vase resembles a thick bottle that is separated into two chambers: the sealed outer chamber is filled with potassium carbonate, while the inner chamber can hold flowers.

When smashed in a fire, the vase releases the potassium carbonate, which, in turn, limits oxygen and puts out the flames.

Cheil created the product for Samsung Fire & Marine Insurance as part of the latter's campaign to encourage South Korean households to have a fire extinguisher readily available.

9 PHOTOS
Homes destroyed by Southern California's Woolsey Fire
See Gallery
Homes destroyed by Southern California's Woolsey Fire
A home burned down by a wildfire sits on a hilltop overlooking the Pacific Ocean, Sunday, Nov. 11, 2018, in Malibu, Calif. Fire officials say the lull allowed firefighters to gain 10 percent control of the so-called Woolsey Fire, which has burned more than 130 square miles in western Los Angeles County and southeastern Ventura County since Thursday. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
A table and chairs stand outside of one of at least 20 homes destroyed just on Windermere Drive in the Point Dume area of Malibu, Calif., Saturday, Nov. 10, 2018. Known as the Woolsey Fire, it has consumed thousands of acres and destroyed dozens of homes. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon)
A statuary figure of a boy stands outside one of at least 20 homes destroyed just on Windermere Drive in the Point Dume area of Malibu, Calif., Saturday, Nov. 10, 2018. Known as the Woolsey Fire, it has consumed tens of thousands of acres and destroyed dozens of homes. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon)
A swimming pool is behind one burned home, with others at left, some of at least 20 homes destroyed just on Windermere Drive in the Point Dume area of Malibu, Calif., Saturday, Nov. 10, 2018. Known as the Woolsey Fire, it has consumed tens of thousands of acres and destroyed dozens of homes. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon)
A nearby fire truck throws red light on property burnt in the Woolsey Fire, along the coast in the Point Dume neighborhood in Malibu, California as night falls November 12, 2018. - Fire trucks are positions through out the city to respond to spot fires caused by wind-driven hot embers. Another three firefighters have been injured battling the Woolsey Fire, which has devoured mansions and mobile homes alike in the coastal celebrity resort of Malibu, while the death toll from a huge blaze in northern California rose to 42 on November 12, making it the deadliest wildfire in state history. (Photo by Robyn Beck / AFP) (Photo credit should read ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images)
The remnants of a home destroyed in the Woolsey fire are seen November 12, 2018 along Mulholland Highway in the hills above Malibu, California. - Another three firefighters have been injured battling the Woolsey Fire, which has devoured mansions and mobile homes alike in the coastal celebrity resort of Malibu, while the death toll from a huge blaze in northern California rose to 42 on November 12, making it the deadliest wildfire in state history. (Photo by Robyn Beck / AFP) (Photo credit should read ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images)
MALIBU, CA - NOVEMBER 12: All that remains of this home along Dume Drive in Malibu is the white picket fence. Dume road was hit hard by the Wolsey fire with multiple home damaged or destroyed. (Photo by David Crane/Digital First Media/Los Angeles Daily News via Getty Images)
MALIBU, CA - NOVEMBER 12: Multiple houses along Dume Drive in Malibu were destroyed or damages by the Wolsey fire. (Photo by David Crane/Digital First Media/Los Angeles Daily News via Getty Images)
MALIBU, CA - NOVEMBER 12: Multiple houses along Dume Drive in Malibu were destroyed or damages by the Wolsey fire. (Photo by David Crane/Digital First Media/Los Angeles Daily News via Getty Images)
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

Korea's National Fire Agency reports more than 10,000 residential fires annually, Popular Mechanic notes. Just 42 percent of South Korean homes carry a fire extinguisher, despite the fact that the country passed a law requiring every household to have one by 2017.

To increase awareness, Samsung Fire & Marine Insurance distributed over 100,000 Firevases towards the end of last year, according to Dezeen. The company claims 81 percent of respondents were more mindful of having an extinguisher following the campaign, which reached 32 million people across social media platforms in just four months. 

By comparison, approximately 364,000 residential building fires occurred in the United States in 2016, the most recent year for which data from the U.S. Fire Administration was available. There is no law that requires homes to have a fire extinguisher, although it is encouraged. 

Read Full Story