US Presidents have thrown out the first pitch for MLB's opening day for over 100 years — here's the history from Taft to Obama

  • March 28, 2019 is opening day for the 2019 Major League Baseball season.
  • Over the past 100 years, many American presidents have celebrated America's pastime by throwing out the ceremonial first pitch at opening days. 
  • Many former presidents including George H.W. Bush and Franklin Delano Roosevelt were lifelong lovers of the sport.
  • Here are some of the times US Presidents have thrown the first pitches on past opening days.

March 28 is Opening Day for the 2019 Major League Baseball season, which in previous years has seen its fair share of politicians throwing out the ceremonial first pitch.

Many former US presidents, regardless of their political affiliation, have shared a lifelong passion for America's pastime, and have taken to the mound to throw the first pitch on opening days dating back to 1910

During the Great Depression, then-president Franklin Delano Roosevelt supported baseball as a comfort and a light-hearted distraction from the struggles Americans were facing. 

Ronald Reagan also broadcasted play-by-play re-enactments of Chicago Cubs game for an Iowa radio station in the 1930s — and would go on to throw out the first pitch as President himself.

President Donald Trump has yet to throw out the first pitch at an MLB opening day while in office.

Here are some of the times US Presidents have thrown the first pitches on past opening days.

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Presidents who have thrown out first pitches on MLB opening day
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Presidents who have thrown out first pitches on MLB opening day

President Barack Obama threw the first pitch at a Washington Nationals vs. Philadelphia Phillies game on opening day 2010.

(Photo credit SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)

In 2009, Vice President Joe Biden threw the first pitch at the Baltimore Orioles vs. New York Yankees opening-day game.

(AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

George W. Bush threw the first pitch at the Milwaukee Brewers vs. Cincinnati Reds game in 2001, the first year of his presidency.

(Photo credit TIM SLOAN/AFP/Getty Images)

President Bill Clinton threw the first pitch for the Baltimore Orioles' opening-day games multiple times during his presidency. While he grew up in Arkansas, his wife Hillary Clinton turned him into a Chicago Cubs fan.

Source: The Baseball Almanac

(Photo by Scott Wachter/ALLSPORT via Getty Images)

George H.W. Bush, a lifelong lover of the sport, threw out many first pitches during his political career. Here he is in 1988 at the New York Mets opening day.

(Photo by David Rentas/New York Post Archives /(c) NYP Holdings, Inc. via Getty Images)

Back in the 1930s, President Ronald Reagan's broadcasted play-by-play re-enactments of Chicago Cubs games for an Iowa radio station. He threw out many first pitches during his political career.

Sources: ESPN,New York Times

(AP Photo/Charles Tasnadi)

President John F. Kennedy once threw out the first pitch wearing a suit. He was a baseball fan throughout his entire life, and cultivated the support of prominent baseball players during his campaigns for political office.

Source: New York Times

(AP Photo)

President and General Dwight Eisenhower had a secret career playing minor league baseball before attending West Point Military Academy in the early 20th century.

Source: New York Times

(AP Photo)

Baseball was a comforting distraction to many Americans during the Great Depression and World War II, and President Franklin Delano Roosevelt encouraged the sport to carry on during the nation's most difficult times.

Source: National Archives

(AP Photo)

The first US President known to ever throw the first pitch at an opening-day baseball game was William Howard Taft in 1910.

Source: ESPN

(AP Photo, File)

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SEE ALSO: MLB Power Rankings: Where every team stands on the eve of the 2019 season

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