Dems want to end the Electoral College. Trump says it's 'very strange.'

Some Democrats have expressed openness to drastically changing the U.S. system of government, whether it be abolishing the Electoral College or expanding the Supreme Court.

On Tuesday night, President Donald Trump pushed back at Democrats, calling them "very 'strange.'"

"They now want to change the voting age to 16, abolish the Electoral College, and Increase significantly the number of Supreme Court Justices," he tweeted. "Actually, you've got to win it at the Ballot Box!"

That tweet came after a two-part defense of the Electoral College, which Trump in 2012 said was "a disaster for a democracy." Since 2000, the presidency has twice been won by the candidate who lost the popular vote, including by Trump in 2016.

"Campaigning for the Popular Vote is much easier & different than campaigning for the Electoral College," Trump tweeted. "It's like training for the 100 yard dash vs. a marathon. The brilliance of the Electoral College is that you must go to many States to win."

"With the Popular Vote, you go to ... just the large States — the Cities would end up running the Country," he continued. "Smaller States & the entire Midwest would end up losing all power — & we can't let that happen. I used to like the idea of the Popular Vote, but now realize the Electoral College is far better for the U.S.A."

Related: Trump receives electoral college vote

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Trump receives electoral college vote
Pennsylvania elector Carolyn Bunny Welsh holds her ballot for U.S. President-elect Donald Trump before casting it at the Pennsylvania State Capitol in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, U.S. December 19, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Pennsylvania electors cast their ballots for U.S. President-elect Donald Trump at the Pennsylvania State Capitol in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, U.S. December 19, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
People protest against U.S. President-elect Donald Trump as electors gather to cast their votes for U.S. president at the Pennsylvania State Capitol in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, U.S. December 19, 2016. Pennsylvania's twenty electors are assumed to be committed to Trump by virtue of his having won the popular vote in the state, but the vote that is usually routine takes place this year amid allegations of Russian hacking to try to influence the election. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Pennsylvania electors bow their heads in prayer before casting their votes for U.S. President-elect Donald Trump at the Pennsylvania State Capitol in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, U.S. December 19, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Protesters rally outside as Michigan's 16 presidential electors meet at the State Capitol building to cast formal votes for the president and vice president of the United States in Lansing, Michigan, U.S., December 19, 2016. REUTERS/Rebecca Cook
Electoral college tellers count the ballots Pennsylvania electors cast for U.S. President-elect Donald Trump at the Pennsylvania State Capitol in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, U.S. December 19, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Pennsylvania electors take their oath of office before casting their votes for U.S. President-elect Donald Trump at the Pennsylvania State Capitol in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, U.S. December 19, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Supporters of President-elect Donald Trump hold signs in the Senate gallery as Michigan's electors cast formal votes for the president and vice president of the United States in Lansing, Michigan, U.S., December 19, 2016. REUTERS/Rebecca Cook
Activists demonstrate against U.S. President-elect Donald Trump ahead of the meeting of the Electoral College at the Texas State Capitol in Austin, Texas, U.S. December 19, 2016. REUTERS/Mohammad Khursheed
North Carolina's Thirteenth District Elector Ann Sullivan wears clothes adorned with patriotic and Republican Party symbols after the state's Electoral College affirmed their votes for U.S. President-elect Donald Trump in the State Capitol building in Raleigh, North Carolina, U.S. December 19, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake
Protesters shout in anger from the gallery at Pennsylvania electors after they cast their votes for U.S. President-elect Donald Trump at the Pennsylvania State Capitol in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, U.S. December 19, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
People protest against U.S. President-elect Donald Trump as electors gather to cast their votes for U.S. president at the Pennsylvania State Capitol in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, U.S. December 19, 2016. Pennsylvania's twenty electors are assumed to be committed to Trump by virtue of his having won the popular vote in the state, but the vote that is usually routine takes place this year amid allegations of Russian hacking to try to influence the election. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Activists demonstrate against U.S. President-elect Donald Trump ahead of the meeting of the Electoral College at the Texas State Capitol in Austin, Texas, U.S. December 19, 2016. REUTERS/Mohammad Khursheed
Pennsylvania elector Carolyn Bunny Welsh smiles as she returns to her seat after casting her ballot for U.S. President-elect Donald Trump at the Pennsylvania State Capitol in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, U.S. December 19, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
North Carolina's Electoral College representatives pose for a group photo after formally voting for U.S. President-elect Donald Trump in the State Capitol building in Raleigh, North Carolina, U.S., December 19, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake
North Carolina's Electoral College representatives sign the Certificates of Vote after affirming their votes, all for U.S. President-elect Donald Trump, at a ceremony in the State Capitol building in Raleigh, North Carolina, U.S., December 19, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Drake
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Trump's tweet came after some of the 2020 heavyweights expressed openness to or endorsed those ideas. During a CNN town hall on Monday, Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., said she would back a plan to scrap the Electoral College.

"My view is that every vote matters," Warren said. "And the way we can make that happen is that we can have national voting and that means get rid of the Electoral College — and every vote counts."

Former Rep. Beto O'Rourke, D-Texas, addressed the idea on Tuesday while campaigning at Penn State University, saying there is "a lot of wisdom" in calls to abolish the Electoral College.

"I think there's a lot to that. Because you had an election in 2016 where the loser got 3 million more votes than the victor," O'Rourke said. "It puts some states out of play altogether, they don't feel like their votes really count."

O'Rourke had earlier said he's open to expanding the Supreme Court.

"What if there were five justices selected by Democrats, five justices selected by Republicans, and those 10 then pick five more justices independent of those who chose the first 10?" O'Rourke said in Iowa on Thursday. "I think that's an idea we should explore."

That idea has been echoed by other Democratic candidates, such as Pete Buttigieg, the mayor of South Bend, Indiana.

"I would like to start exploring a lot of options," Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., added Monday. "Term limits for Supreme Court justices might be one thing."

One idea some Democratic contenders have floated that Trump did not think was "very strange" was abolishing the Senate's legislative filibuster — the 60 vote threshold. Trump has railed on the need for bills to have 60 votes in order to pass when legislation he desires cannot make it through the Senate.

In June, he said Republicans "must end the ridiculous 60 vote, or Filibuster, rule."

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