As Boeing grounds its entire global fleet of Max aircraft, Trump says 'figure it out fast'

President Donald Trump said Thursday that Boeing was under great pressure to "figure it out fast," after the aerospace giant temporarily grounded its entire global fleet of 737 Max aircraft.

The U.S. company has been under intense pressure to quash fears about the safety of the plane after regulators from the U.K. to Australia grounded the Max, citing similarities between Sunday's fatal crash in Ethiopia and last year's Lion Air crash in Indonesia.

The U.S. was one of the last countries to ban the best-selling jetliner, with Trump announcing an emergency order from the Federal Administration Administration on Wednesday, citing "new information and physical evidence" that could connect the two disasters.

Daniel Elwell, acting head of the FAA, told the TODAY show on Thursday that, based on newly obtained evidence, the agency is close to establishing that the two Max 8 jets involved in the deadly crashes were brought down by the same cause.

"We are much closer to that possibility, and that's why we grounded the airplanes," Elwell said. "We got new information yesterday, and we acted on it. It is in our minds now a link that is close enough to ground the airplanes."

In the case of the Indonesia crash, which killed all 189 people on board, Lion Air said faulty sensors had triggered an automatic nose-down command that the pilots could not override.

The FAA said new data "indicates some similarities" that "warrant further investigation of the possibility of a shared cause that needs to be better understood and addressed."

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Air Force One, a heavily modified Boeing 747, is seen prior to US President Barack Obama departure from Andrews Air Force Base in Maryland, December 6, 2016, as he travels to Tampa, Florida, to speak about counterterrorism and visit with troops. / AFP / SAUL LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
Old airplanes, including Boeing 747-400s, are stored in the desert in Victorville, California March 13, 2015. Last year, there were zero orders placed by commercial airlines for new Boeing 747s or Airbus A380s, reflecting a fundamental shift in the industry toward smaller, twin-engine planes. Smaller planes cost less to fly than the stately, four-engine jumbos, which can carry as many as 525 passengers. Picture taken March 13, 2015. To match Insight AEROSPACE-JUMBO REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
Old airplanes, including Boeing 747-400s, are stored in the desert in Victorville, California March 13, 2015. Last year, there were zero orders placed by commercial airlines for new Boeing 747s or Airbus A380s, reflecting a fundamental shift in the industry toward smaller, twin-engine planes. Smaller planes cost less to fly than the stately, four-engine jumbos, which can carry as many as 525 passengers. Picture taken March 13, 2015. To match Insight AEROSPACE-JUMBO REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
Boeing 747 also known as a jumbo jet lines up on a runway in preparation for takeoff.
Old airplanes, including British Airways Boeing 747-400s and FedEx planes, are stored in the desert in Victorville, California March 13, 2015. Last year, there were zero orders placed by commercial airlines for new Boeing 747s or Airbus A380s, reflecting a fundamental shift in the industry toward smaller, twin-engine planes. Smaller planes cost less to fly than the stately, four-engine jumbos, which can carry as many as 525 passengers. Picture taken March 13, 2015. To match Insight AEROSPACE-JUMBO REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
Old airplanes, including British Airways and Air New Zealand Boeing 747-400s, are stored in the desert in Victorville, California March 13, 2015. Last year, there were zero orders placed by commercial airlines for new Boeing 747s or Airbus A380s, reflecting a fundamental shift in the industry toward smaller, twin-engine planes. Smaller planes cost less to fly than the stately, four-engine jumbos, which can carry as many as 525 passengers. Picture taken March 13, 2015. To match Insight AEROSPACE-JUMBO REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
VLADIVOSTOK, RUSSIA - JUNE 10, 2016: Deicing Rossiya Airlines' Boeing 747-400 EI-XLJ Vladivostok aircraft at a city airport. Rossiya Airlines launched Moscow-Vladivostok-Moscow services on May 31, 2016. Yuri Smityuk/TASS (Photo by Yuri Smityuk\TASS via Getty Images)
Space Shuttle Discovery rides piggyback atop a specially modified Boeing 747 as it departs runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base in California on its ferry flight back to Kennedy Space Center in Florida August 19, 2005. Discovery began the return journey to its Florida home port from its landing site in California on Friday after having to land at Edwards Air Force base because of thunderstorms at Cape Canaveral. REUTERS/Tom Rogers TR/HK/KS
The interior of Saudi Prince Alwaleed bin Talal's private Boeing 747 airplane in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, on Tuesday, April 27, 2010. Alwaleed said he will continue working with Goldman Sachs Group Inc. after the U.S. regulator sued the most profitable securities firm in Wall Street history for misleading its investors. Photographer: Waseem Obaidi/Bloomberg via Getty Images
UNITED STATES - JANUARY 18: Interior of the business class section of the life-size display of the new Boeing 747-8 Intercontinental in Renton, Washington, Thursday, Jan. 18, 2007. The plane is a stretched version of the current 747-400 and incorporates interior featured from the 777 and the upcoming 787. (Photo by Kevin P. Casey/Bloomberg via Getty Images)
Wide angle view of the modern flight deck of a Boeing 747 aircraft.
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To that end, the National Transportation Safety Board is sending three investigators to France to help analyze the flight recorders from the Ethiopian Airlines crash, the agency announced on Thursday. The black boxes were sent to the Bureau d'Enquêtes et d'Analyses just outside Paris, after Ethiopia said it did not have the capacity for such a complex analysis.

The BEA has worked on several high-profile investigations, including Germanwings Flight 925 in 2015, when a co-pilot was found to have deliberately crashed the plane into the French Alps.

A spokesman for the BEA warned that it could take several days to even download the information from the black boxes. "First we will try to read the data," he told Reuters on Thursday.

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