Biden gets key encouragement from firefighters union

WASHINGTON — Joe Biden may not be ready yet to tell Americans if he's running for president. But starting with appearances this week in front of two supportive audiences, he's about to start telling them why.

For the first time since the midterm elections, the former vice president will headline a pair of political events that may serve as a final test drive of the message he could take into the 2020 campaign, one advisers say balances a bold agenda focused on reviving the middle class with an appeal for moving beyond the smallness in our politics.

Underlying Biden's pitch is the urgency of defeating a president that he feels has governed at odds with America's values — framing the next election as a "battle for the soul of America," as he has put it.

It begins Tuesday when Biden addresses the International Association of Firefighters for what could amount to a pre-emptive endorsement event.

"You're going to see, 'Run Joe Run,' the gold and black 'Firefighters for Biden,'" IAFF General President Harold Schaitberger told NBC News Monday. "We'll be doing everything to show where we stand. And then it's up to him to make his final decision."

Advisers insist that Biden still hasn't made one. He and his wife spent last week on what may well have been a final pre-campaign vacation in St. Croix, ahead of an informal deadline that his team had set as the goal for getting the green-light to execute the campaign plan long in the works.

No final decisions have been made about what would be the campaign platform, either. But advisers say the starting point would be what they sketched out as he considered entering the 2016 race.

Related: Hillary Clinton and Joe Biden together through the years:

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Hillary Clinton and Joe Biden together through the years
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Hillary Clinton and Joe Biden together through the years
U.S. Vice President Joe Biden (L) and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton (R) attend a ceremony to unveil a portrait honoring retiring Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S. December 8, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton (L) is joined by her husband former US President Bill Clinton (R) and US Vice President Joe Biden as she is ceremonially sworn in at the State Department in Washington, February 2, 2009. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst (UNITED STATES)
Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton welcomes Vice President Joe Biden as he disembarks from Air Force Two for a joint campaign event in Scranton, Pennsylvania, August 15, 2016. REUTERS/Charles Mostoller
PORTSMOUTH, NH - MAY 11: Democratic presidential candidate Senator Hillary Clinton (D-NY) greets fellow presidential candidate Joe Biden (D-DE) in the lobby of the Sheraton Harborside Portsmouth after addressing the International Association of Fire Fighters Convention (IAFF) Conference May 11, 2007 in Portsmouth, New Hampshire. The IAFF is a labor union of fire fighters from the United States and Canada, formed in 1918, consisting of 280,000 members. (Photo by Darren McCollester/Getty Images)
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton and Vice-President Joe Biden campaign together during an event in Scranton, Pennsylvania, August 15, 2016. REUTERS/Charles Mostoller
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton and Vice-President Joe Biden wave to neighbors as they stopped to visit Biden's childhood home in Scranton, Pennsylvania, August 15, 2016. REUTERS/Charles Mostoller
U.S. Vice President Joe Biden (L) and former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton (R) attend a ceremony to unveil a portrait honoring retiring Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S. December 8, 2016. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton and Vice-President Joe Biden campaign together during an event in Scranton, Pennsylvania, August 15, 2016. REUTERS/Charles Mostoller
U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton (C) addresses a luncheon held in honor of German Chancellor Angela Merkel (L), as U.S. Vice President Joe Biden looks on at the State Department in Washington, June 7, 2011. REUTERS/Stelios Varias (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS)
UNITED STATES - AUGUST 15: Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton and Vice President Joe Biden conduct a campaign rally at Riverfront Sports in Scranton, Pa., August 15, 2016. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
Scranton, PA - AUGUST 15: Democratic Presidential nominee Hillary Clinton and US Vice President Joe Biden acknowledge the crowd at Riverfront Sports athletic facility on August 15, 2016 in Scranton, Pennsylvania. Hillary Clinton focused her speech on the economy and bringing jobs to the key swing state of Pennsylvania. (Photo by Mark Makela/Getty Images)
U.S. President Barack Obama delivers a statement on the Afghanistan-Pakistan Annual Review from the White House Briefing Room with Vice President Joe Biden (L) and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton looking on in Washington December 16, 2010. The review said "notable operational gains" had been made and Taliban momentum had been "arrested" in much of the country and reversed in some areas, but any gains were fragile and reversible. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST CONFLICT)
Combination images show U.S. Vice President Joe Biden and U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton (R) sharing a laugh during the Lilly Ledbetter Fair Pay Act signing ceremony in the East Room of the White House in Washington, January 29, 2009. REUTERS/Jason Reed (UNITED STATES)
Orangeburg, UNITED STATES: Democratic presidential hopefuls (L-R) US Senator Joe Biden, US Senator Barack Obama and US Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton arrive at the Democratic Party Presidential Primary Debate, 26 April 2007, at South Carolina State University in Orangeburg, South Carolina. AFP PHOTO/Stan HONDA (Photo credit should read STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images)
Washington, UNITED STATES: US Democratic Senator from Nedw York Hillary Clinton (R) greets a member of Congress next to Democratic Senator from Delaware Joe Biden (C) as they arrives for US President George W. Bush's annual State of the Union address to a joint session of Congress at the Capitol in Washington 23 January 2007. AFP PHOTO/Larry Downing/Pool (Photo credit should read LARRY DOWNING/AFP/Getty Images)
U.S. President Barack Obama (2nd L) and Vice President Joe Biden (L), along with members of the national security team, receive an update on the mission against Osama bin Laden in the Situation Room of the White House, May 1, 2011. Also pictured are Secretary of State Hillary Clinton (2nd R) and Defense Secretary Robert Gates (R). Please note: A classified document seen in this photograph has been obscured at source. Picture taken May 1, 2011. A pivotal moment in the long, tortuous quest to find Osama bin Laden came years before U.S. spy agencies discovered his hermetic compound in Abbottabad, Pakistan. REUTERS/White House/Pete Souza/Handout (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS CIVIL UNREST MILITARY IMAGES OF THE DAY) FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS. THIS IMAGE HAS BEEN SUPPLIED BY A THIRD PARTY. IT IS DISTRIBUTED, EXACTLY AS RECEIVED BY REUTERS, AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS To match special report BINLADEN/KILL (SPECIAL REPORT)
Orangeburg, UNITED STATES: Democratic presidential hopefuls (L-R) US Senator Joe Biden, New Mexico Governor Bill Richardson, US Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton arrive at the Democratic Party Presidential Primary Debate, 26 April 2007, at South Carolina State University in Orangeburg, South Carolina. AFP PHOTO/Stan HONDA (Photo credit should read STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images)
Orangeburg, UNITED STATES: Democratic presidential hopefuls (L-R) US Senator Joe Biden, New Mexico Governor Bill Richardson, US Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton arrive at the Democratic Party Presidential Primary Debate, 26 April 2007, at South Carolina State University in Orangeburg, South Carolina. AFP PHOTO/Stan HONDA (Photo credit should read STAN HONDA/AFP/Getty Images)
Democratic presidential candidate U.S. Senator Hillary Clinton (D-NY)(L) and U.S. Senator Joe Biden (D-DE) speak after their debate at Howard University in Washington, June 28, 2007. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque (UNITED STATES)
U.S. Senator Hillary Clinton (D-NY) (R) is greeted by U.S. Senator Joseph Biden (D-De) at a Democratic Presidential Candidates Forum sponsored by AFSCME in Carson City, Nevada, February 21, 2007. REUTERS/Kimberly White (UNITED STATES)
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton (D-NY) (L) and Senator Joe Biden (D-DE) listen as U.S. President George W. Bush delivers the final State of the Union address of his presidency in Washington January 28, 2008. REUTERS/Larry Downing (UNITED STATES)
U.S. Democratic presidential candidate Senator Hillary Clinton (D-NY) speaks while Senator Joe Biden (D-DE) listens during the AFL-CIO Presidential Forum at Soldier Field in Chicago, August 7, 2007. REUTERS/John Gress (UNITED STATES)
German Chancellor Angela Merkel (L) presents a gift to U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, as U.S. Vice President Joe Biden watches, during a luncheon held in Merkel's honor at the State Department in Washington June 7, 2011. REUTERS/Stelios Varias (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS)
U.S. Vice President Joe Biden and U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton talk during a meeting between U.S. President Barack Obama and Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan of Turkey in the Oval Office at the White House in Washington December 7, 2009. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque (UNITED STATES POLITICS)
U.S. Vice President Joe Biden (C) speaks at the third annual U.S.-China Strategic and Economic Dialogue (S&ED) at the Department of the Interior in Washington May 9, 2011. Flanking Biden are Chinese Vice Premier Wang Qishan (L) and U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque (UNITED STATES - Tags: BUSINESS POLITICS)
U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton speaks to Vice President Joe Biden as U.S. Middle East envoy George Mitchell (R) looks on during a meeting between U.S. President Barack Obama and Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington May 28, 2009. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque (UNITED STATES POLITICS)
U.S. Vice President Joe Biden (C), Indian Prime Minister Manmohan Singh (L) and U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton toast during a luncheon at the State Department in Washington November 24, 2009. REUTERS/Yuri Gripas (UNITED STATES POLITICS)
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The 2,500-word announcement speech that Biden never ultimately delivered promised voters a campaign based on the principle of "one America, bound together in this great experiment of equality and opportunity," where "everyone — and I mean everyone — is in on the deal."

Among proposals Biden is again considering for 2020 are:

  • A tax code overhaul to treat investment income as earned income, changes that would help pay for free community college.
  • A $15 per-hour minimum wage.
  • Free tuition at public colleges and universities.
  • A major "American Renewal Project" to rebuild the nation's infrastructure.

In 2018 Biden focused often during campaign events on the need to protect and improve on the Affordable Care Act, but he has yet to embrace "Medicare for All," an emerging litmus test for Democratic candidates.

On another front, Biden has said he is prepared to reject the support of a super PAC to boost his candidacy — surrendering what would be a potential advantage in the crowded field given his longstanding ties to major Democratic donors.

Make or break moment

Biden may well sound like a candidate this week when he addresses two very friendly crowds: Tuesday at the International Association of Firefighters, and Saturday at a Delaware Democratic Party dinner in Dover.

Tuesday's IAFF conference will look and sound a lot like an endorsement event. In past presidential cycles the union invited multiple candidates in both parties to address their members. But this year Biden was the only candidate or potential candidate to score an invitation.

Schaitberger said that while Biden is not officially a candidate, he sees the delay "as more strategical about the timing of a likely announcement than maybe the actual decision on whether to announce."

"I'd be very surprised" if he didn't run, he said.

Biden's uncertain plans remain the single biggest variable in a Democratic primary fight that has been waging in earnest now for two months. But according to conversations with aides familiar with the discussions, even most in Biden's orbit who had believed he could pass on the race now say they would be surprised if he doesn't run.

His team has recently impressed upon him the timeline needed to prepare for a campaign launch in early or mid-April. While no campaign jobs have been formally offered, discussions underway for months with potential staff have gone from theoretical opportunities to specific roles, following Biden's instructions that his campaign team "reflects the country" with diversity in senior roles.

The coming week may be a point of no return for him, as aides recognize that the party's patience is wearing thin. To the extent advisers identify any potential hurdles he's still reckoning with, they are parallel: how and when to engage with attacks from the most strident partisans voices in both parties, including Trump.

Even as Biden will tout a bold agenda he has stressed the need for both parties to be willing and able to forge compromises when in the public interest.

"Our job is to restore dignity to the political discourse, and restore the basic bargain in America," Biden said at his post-White House appearance in Iowa, last October. "The only thing that's strong enough to tear America apart is America itself."

It's a message seemingly at odds with a vocal cohort in the party that sees any form of accommodation with Republicans as disqualifying. Biden was pilloried for calling Vice President Mike Pence a "decent guy," even though it came in the context of drawing a sharp contrast with the administration's foreign policy. In January he forcefully pushed back at criticism of his praise for a vulnerable Republican congressman just weeks before the midterm elections.

"I don't know how you get anything done unless we start talking to one another again," he said then.

The message that still didn't sit well with key voices in the base.

"Declarations of, 'Oh, we need to get back to doing bipartisan things,' it's just not the era that we're in," Rep. Primila Jayapal, D-Wash., co-chair of the House Progressive Caucus told NBC News recently. "We have to understand the threat that our democracy is in, and not romanticize some notion that really isn't relevant to where we are today."

Biden's team says there is ample evidence that more primary voters share his outlook, and that he could have the broadest appeal in a race against Trump. In 2018 Biden appeared in support of 16 Democrats who flipped GOP-held House seats, and four who won back GOP-held governors' mansions, in places like Pennsylvania, Wisconsin and Michigan that carried Trump into the White House.

Public polling suggests that Democratic voters, for now, are more interested in backing a candidate who can beat Trump than someone who lines up with them on issues ). And a January poll from the Pew Research Center found that among Democratic and Democratic-leaning registered voters, 53% wanted the party to move in a more moderate direction than more liberal.

"You've got a number of candidates chopping up that particular space on the extreme left end of the political spectrum," former Florida Sen. Bill Nelson said in an interview. "There is a good part of the left of center that, if he runs, Joe will occupy. And that puts him in the best position in a general election to win the presidency."

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