Donald Trump signs Bibles as he meets with Alabama tornado victims

Touring the area where a violent tornado touched down earlier in the week, President Trump signed Bibles for supporters who gathered to see him at a Baptist church in Opelika, Ala.

A local television reporter, Sally Pitts, posted video of the visit.

Ada Ingram, a volunteer at the church, said Trump signed several hats and Bibles, and praised the president for taking the time to travel to Alabama.

“I enjoyed him coming,” said Ingram. “I think it’s a godsend. I’m sorry. The situation is bad. And there are going to be people who will say, ‘Why did he come to my town?’ I don’t know why. I don’t know why the hurricane happened [either]. But there is a reason.”

Twenty-three people were killed Sunday after an EF4 storm laid waste to the rural Alabama countryside.

“I saw this and it’s hard to believe,” Trump said Friday of the destruction. “You saw things that you wouldn’t believe.”

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Tornadoes strike in Alabama, Georgia
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Tornadoes strike in Alabama, Georgia
BEAUREGARD, AL- MARCH 4: Damaged trees are photographed after two back-to-back tornadoes touched down in Beauregard, Alabama, U.S., on March 4, 2019 (Photo by Robert Ray for The Washington Post via Getty Images)
Residents and friends help clean up after a tornado struck in Beauregard, Alabama on March 4, 2019. - Rescuers in Alabama resumed search operations Monday after at least two tornadoes killed 23 people, uprooted trees and caused 'catastrophic' damage to buildings and roads in the southern US state. 'The devastation is incredible,' Lee County Sheriff Jay Jones told the local CBS affiliate late Sunday.'I cannot recall at least in the last 50 years... a situation where we have had this loss of life that we experienced today.' (Photo by Tami Chappell / AFP) (Photo credit should read TAMI CHAPPELL/AFP/Getty Images)
Resident Shannon Kelley talks on the phone as she walks down her street after a tornado struck in Beauregard, Alabama on March 4, 2019. - Kelley told AFP 'I am glad my family wasn't home' 'Its all material things that can be replaced but I have no insurance.' Rescuers in Alabama resumed search operations Monday after at least two tornadoes killed 23 people, uprooted trees and caused 'catastrophic' damage to buildings and roads in the southern US state. 'The devastation is incredible,' Lee County Sheriff Jay Jones told the local CBS affiliate late Sunday.'I cannot recall at least in the last 50 years... a situation where we have had this loss of life that we experienced today.' (Photo by Tami Chappell / AFP) (Photo credit should read TAMI CHAPPELL/AFP/Getty Images)
BEAUREGARD, AL - MARCH 04: Trees lay snapped in half in the aftermath of a tornado on March 4, 2019 in Beauregard, Alabama. At least 23 people are confirmed dead following Sunday's tornado outbreak with violent storms that left debris strewn across southern Alabama and Georgia. (Photo by Jessica McGowan/Getty Images)
SMITH STATION, AL - MARCH 04: Gabe and Brandi O'Neal embrace outside of the Buck Wild Saloon after it was destroyed by a tornado on March 4, 2019 in Smith Station, Alabama. No customers were inside the bar when the tornado hit Sunday afternoon. At least 23 people are confirmed dead following Sunday's tornado outbreak with violent storms that left debris strewn across southern Alabama and Georgia. (Photo by Jessica McGowan/Getty Images)
BEAUREGARD, AL - MARCH 04: Volunteers and residents clean up trees and debris from a tornado at a home on March 4, 2019 in Beauregard, Alabama. At least 23 people are confirmed dead following Sunday's tornado outbreak with violent storms that left debris strewn across southern Alabama and Georgia. (Photo by Jessica McGowan/Getty Images)
Damage is seen from a tornado which killed at least 23 people in Beauregard, Alabama on March 4, 2019. - Rescuers in Alabama were set to resume search operations Monday after at least two tornadoes killed 23 people, uprooted trees and caused 'catastrophic' damage to buildings and roads in the southern US state.'The devastation is incredible,' Lee County Sheriff Jay Jones told the local CBS affiliate late Sunday.'I cannot recall at least in the last 50 years... a situation where we have had this loss of life that we experienced today.' (Photo by Tami Chappell / AFP) (Photo credit should read TAMI CHAPPELL/AFP/Getty Images)
Damage is seen from a tornado which killed at least 23 people in Beauregard, Alabama on March 4, 2019. - Rescuers in Alabama were set to resume search operations Monday after at least two tornadoes killed 23 people, uprooted trees and caused 'catastrophic' damage to buildings and roads in the southern US state.'The devastation is incredible,' Lee County Sheriff Jay Jones told the local CBS affiliate late Sunday.'I cannot recall at least in the last 50 years... a situation where we have had this loss of life that we experienced today.' (Photo by Tami Chappell / AFP) (Photo credit should read TAMI CHAPPELL/AFP/Getty Images)
Carol Dean, right, cries while embraced by Megan Anderson and her 18-month-old daughter Madilyn, as Dean sifts through the debris of the home she shared with her husband, David Wayne Dean, who died when a tornado destroyed the house in Beauregard, Ala., Monday, March 4, 2019. "He was my wedding gift," said Dean of her husband whom she married three years ago. "He was one in a million. He'd send me flowers to work just to let me know he loved me. He'd send me some of the biggest strawberries in the world. I'm not going to be the same." (AP Photo/David Goldman)
Matthew Schell looks for personal mementos by flashlight at dusk in the rubble of the house destroyed by a tornado which killed his uncle, David Wayne Dean, in Beauregard, Ala., Monday, March 4, 2019. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
Danny Allen recovers a family photo while sifting through the debris of a friend's home destroyed by a tornado in Beauregard, Ala., Monday, March 4, 2019. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
Granadas Baker, left, and son Granadas Jr. 18, right, retrieve personal items from the damaged home where they survived a tornado a day earlier in Beauregard, Ala., Monday, March 4, 2019. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
Debris from a home litters a yard the day after a tornado blew it off its foundation, lower right, in Beauregard, Ala., Monday, March 4, 2019. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
Danny Allen helps recover belongings while sifting through the debris of a friend's home destroyed by a tornado in Beauregard, Ala., Monday, March 4, 2019. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
Residents of Talbotton, Ga. pray together outside a home destroyed by a tornado the day after storms battered Alabama and Georgia, Monday, March 4, 2019. (Grant Blankenship /The Macon Telegraph via AP)
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While still robust, Trump’s support among evangelical voters has dipped in recent months. A Marist poll released at the beginning of December found 73 percent of white evangelicals approved of the job he was doing. Six weeks later, the same polling organization found that the number had dropped to 66 percent.

Trump has long courted the evangelical vote, proclaiming in a 2015 interview that the Bible is his “favorite book,” while declining to identify his favorite verses.

White House press secretary Sarah Sanders made headlines in January by proclaiming that Trump’s election was a matter of divine intervention.

“I think God calls all of us to fill different roles at different times and I think that he wanted Donald Trump to become president, and that’s why he’s there,” Sanders said in an interview with CBN’s David Brody and Jennifer Wishon.

At his rallies and speeches, the president is often asked to sign a variety of items, including Bibles and copies of his second-favorite book, “The Art of the Deal,” which he wrote.

Among the other items he has signed are numerous executive orders, various bills and at least one blank sheet of paper purporting to be a piece of legislation. At a ceremony recognizing family members of Americans killed by immigrants, he signed a photograph of one victim:

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