Romell Jordan, Ex-New Mexico RB and adopted brother of Red Sox C Blake Swihart, dies at 23

Former New Mexico running back Romell Jordan died Wednesday. He was 23.

Jordan is the adopted brother of Boston Red Sox catcher Blake Swihart. The Red Sox canceled Wednesday morning’s spring training media availability for what the team had initially termed a family emergency for one of its players.

Manager Alex Cora then addressed the situation without providing specifics before the team revealed the situation was related to Jordan’s death.

No cause of death was immediately revealed.

Jordan played running back at New Mexico from 2014-17 and played in 26 games over three seasons with the Lobos. His most prolific season came in 2017, when he appeared in 12 games and had 56 carries for 267 yards and two touchdowns. He finished his New Mexico career with 105 carries for 551 yards and five scores and also had 13 catches for 85 yards.

Jordan moved in with Swiharts in high school

Per Mass Live, Jordan was adopted by the Swihart family after he started living with them while he was in high school. Swihart’s parents, Carla and Arlen, became Jordan’s guardians.

Jordan moved in with the Swihart family while he was living in New Mexico. He had lived in multiple states as a child with various family members — a 2012 story in the Albuquerque Journal details his tumultuous childhood — and was with his godparents in Rio Rancho. After his godparents told Jordan they were struggling financially, Swihart’s sister Kacie, a high school classmate of Jordan’s, suggested that the family take him in.

Jordan missed 2016 season

Jordan couldn’t play in 2016 because he suffered a torn ACL in spring practice. His mother Tamela Denise Cade-Manning died that September at age 50. He said he struggled dealing with the death of his mother and the rehab process at the same time and had to remind himself how blessed he was.

“I stopped eating, I stopped sleeping,” he told the Journal in 2017. “I just stopped caring. It was just a real low point in my life, and I just didn’t care about much. I didn’t have football, and I didn’t have my mom.”

Jordan redshirted in 2013, his first season at New Mexico. Since he had played in just parts of the 2014 and 2015 seasons at the school, he expressed interest in that 2017 story of trying to get a sixth year of eligibility in 2018. However, he was not on the team’s roster last season.

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Romell Jordan while at New Mexico
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Romell Jordan while at New Mexico
New Mexico running back Romell Jordan sprints to the end zone during the second half of an NCAA college football game against Air Force in Albuquerque, N.M., Saturday, Sep. 30, 2017. (AP Photo/Andres Leighton)
New Mexico running back Romell Jordan (4) sprints to the end zone past Air Force linebacker Ja'Mel Sanders (7) during the second half of an NCAA college football game in Albuquerque, N.M., Saturday, Sept. 30, 2017. New Mexico won 56-38. (AP Photo/Andres Leighton)
New Mexico running back Romell Jordan sprints to the end zone during the second half of an NCAA college football game against Air Force in Albuquerque, N.M., Saturday, Sep. 30, 2017. (AP Photo/Andres Leighton)
New Mexico running back Romell Jordan (4) celebrates after scoring a touchdown during the first half of an NCAA college football game against UNLV in Albuquerque, N.M., Friday, Nov. 17, 2017. (AP Photo/Andres Leighton)
ALBUQUERQUE, NM - DECEMBER 17: UTSA Roadrunners RB Jarveon Williams (2) and New Mexico Lobos RB Romell Jordan (4) exchange jerseys following the Gildan New Mexico Bowl between the New Mexico Lobos and the UTSA Roadrunners on December 17, 2016, at University Stadium in Albuquerque, New Mexico. (Photo by Allan Dranberg/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images)
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Nick Bromberg is a writer for Yahoo Sports.

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