Time's Up CEO stepped down after son accused of sex assault

The CEO and president of Time’s Up stepped down from the organization after her son was accused of sexual assault.

Lisa Borders announced her resignation earlier this week without going into much detail as to why, but Time’s Up further explained the situation in a statement.

"TIME'S UP unequivocally supports all survivors of sexual harassment and abuse,” the statement reads. “On Friday, Lisa Borders informed members of TIME’S UP leadership that sexual assault allegations had been made against her son in a private forum. Within 24 hours, Lisa made the decision to resign as President and CEO of TIME’S UP and we agreed that it was the right decision for all parties involved. All of our actions were fully guided by our support for survivors."

Days after Borders’ resignation, The Los Angeles Times reported that her son had been accused of misconduct by a 31-year-old woman from Santa Monica, Calf., who made her claims in a Facebook post.

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LONDON, ENGLAND - JANUARY 21: Orla Dean, 5, holds a placard during the Time's Up rally at Richmond Terrace, opposite Downing Street on January 21, 2018 in London, England. The Time's Up Women's March marks the one year anniversary of the first Women's March in London and in 2018 it is inspired by the Time's Up movement against sexual abuse. The Time's Up initiative was launched at the start of January 2018 as a response to the #MeToo movement and the Harvey Weinstein scandal. (Photo by Chris J Ratcliffe/Getty Images)
HOLLYWOOD, CA - NOVEMBER 12: Activist Tarana Burke, the original creator of the 'Me Too' hashtag, speaks at the #MeToo Survivors March & Rally on November 12, 2017 in Hollywood, California. (Photo by Chelsea Guglielmino/FilmMagic)
Ada Kennedy, 7, looks up at her mother as they participate in a protest march for survivors of sexual assault and their supporters in Hollywood, Los Angeles, California U.S. November 12, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 30: U.S. House Minority Leader Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) and other House Democrats wear black as they participate in a photo-op at the U.S. Capitol prior to President Donald Trump's first State of the Union address January 30, 2018 in Washington, DC. House Democrats plan to show up in black when attending the State of the Union address this evening in support the #MeToo and #TimesUp movements. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
BERLIN, GERMANY - MARCH 08: Women attend the beginning of a march for women's rights at Schlesisches Tor on International Women's Day on March 8, 2018 in Berlin, Germany. Millions of women across the world are celebrating and maching today, many of them newly motivated by the #metoo movement. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)
NEW YORK, NY - JUNE 5: Harvey Weinstein and attorney Benjamin Brafman exit State Supreme Court, June 5, 2018 in New York City. Weinstein pleaded not guilty on two counts of rape and one count of a criminal sexual act. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
Attorney Gloria Allred (L) participates in the LA Pride Parade in West Hollywood, California on June 10, 2018. The annual LGBTQ celebration drew an estimated crowd of 150,000 people. (Photo by Ronen Tivony/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
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A woman who declined to give her name wears an outfit with the names of all the men in Hollywood who sexually harrassed her during a protest march for survivors of sexual assault and their supporters in Hollywood, Los Angeles, California U.S. November 12, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Samantha Hanahentzen, 17, poses for a #MeToo portrait in Detroit, Michigan, U.S. October 29, 2017. Hanahentzen said: "When I saw the #MeToo hashtag I was just coming to terms with my sexual assault. It happened when I was in middle school by one of my teachers. It took me a while to come forward with what had happened to me and then when I went to the administration I was told I didn't have enough evidence to prove anything and I should just keep quiet about it because I and the school could be sued for slander if I went public with my experience. It was really silencing because when I was being assaulted it was that stereotypical line of 'let's keep this between me and you.' And then when I found the courage to come out with it I was told again 'let's keep this quiet.' So for me too, it was a way to have a voice and it was a way for me to see that I'm not the only one that has gone through this and that women all around the world have all experienced the same thing. It was really unifying." REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
Demonstrators gather on the Hollywood Walk of Fame for a protest for survivors of sexual assault and their supporters in Hollywood, Los Angeles, California U.S. November 12, 2017. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY
LOS ANGELES, CA - SEPTEMBER 28: Activists participate in the 'Believe Survivors. STOP Kavanaugh.' rally hosted by TIME'S UP & Partners at Los Angeles City Hall on September 28, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Chelsea Guglielmino/Getty Images)
LOS ANGELES, CA - JANUARY 20: Actor Sarah Hyland at 2018 Women's March Los Angeles at Pershing Square on January 20, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Araya Diaz/Getty Images)
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Her son, Garry (Dijon) Bowden Jr., has multiple titles, including life coach and photographer, according to The Times. A woman named Celia Gellert claimed to the newspaper that Bowden kissed her on the neck, touched her with his clothed, erect penis and made contact with her genitalia during a “healing session.”

A lawyer for Borders’ son denied the allegations to the L.A. Times, claiming Gellert thanked his client following the session. He also claimed Gellert described the massage as “gentle and authentic and loving” in a text message sent to Bowden, which the lawyer reportedly showed to the newspaper.

Time’s Up was founded in January 2018 and has advocated for the fair treatment of women and fought against sexual harassment and assault.

Borders had joined Time’s Up in October. COO Rebecca Goldman will fill her role on an interim basis as the organization searches for a permenant replacement.

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