Parkland father slams Trump for declaring national emergency

The father of a Parkland shooting victim slammed President Trump for declaring a national emergency over the border wall on the day after the first anniversary of his daughter’s death.

Fred Guttenberg’s 14-year-old daughter, Jaime, was one of the 17 people killed in the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School last year. Since Jaime’s death, Guttenberg has spoken out about the realities of gun violence and advocated for gun control.

In a Friday morning tweet, Guttenberg called out Trump for initially blaming the Parkland shooting on the Russia investigation.

“Very sad that the FBI missed all of the many signals sent out by the Florida school shooter. This is not acceptable,” Trump tweeted three days after the tragedy in 2018. “They are spending too much time trying to prove Russian collusion with the Trump campaign — there is no collusion. Get back to the basics and make us all proud!”

Guttenberg’s tweet then questioned why the president was again distracting from the issue of gun violence by threatening to declare a “fake emergency” on the day after the anniversary of the mass shooting.

On Friday, President Trump declared a national emergency during a press conference in order to build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. Congress’s funding compromise that will avoid a second government shutdown didn’t include the $5.7 billion Trump asked for, but declaring an emergency would allow him to access other funds, as the New York Times reports

“President Trump will sign the government funding bill, and as he has stated before, he will also take other executive action — including a national emergency — to ensure we stop the national security and humanitarian crisis at the border,” White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said on Thursday, per the Times

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Parkland dad confronts Kavanaugh
Judge Brett Kavanaugh (front) listens to Fred Guttenberg (rear), father of Parkland, Florida, shooting victim Jaime Guttenberg, as Kavanaugh gets up during his US Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing to be an Associate Justice on the US Supreme Court, on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, September 4, 2018. - President Donald Trump's newest Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh is expected to face punishing questioning from Democrats this week over his endorsement of presidential immunity and his opposition to abortion. (Photo by Brendan Smialowski / AFP) (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
Fred Guttenberg (L), father of Parkland, Florida, shooting victim Jaime Guttenberg, tries to speak with Judge Brett Kavanaugh as he leaves for a break during his US Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing to be an Associate Justice on the US Supreme Court, on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, September 4, 2018. - President Donald Trump's newest Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh is expected to face punishing questioning from Democrats this week over his endorsement of presidential immunity and his opposition to abortion. (Photo by SAUL LOEB / AFP) (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
Judge Brett Kavanaugh (front) walks away from Fred Guttenberg (rear), father of Parkland, Florida, shooting victim Jaime Guttenberg, as Kavanaugh gets up during his US Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing to be an Associate Justice on the US Supreme Court, on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, September 4, 2018. - President Donald Trump's newest Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh is expected to face punishing questioning from Democrats this week over his endorsement of presidential immunity and his opposition to abortion. (Photo by Brendan Smialowski / AFP) (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
Judge Brett Kavanaugh (front) walks away from Fred Guttenberg (rear), father of Parkland, Florida, shooting victim Jaime Guttenberg, as Kavanaugh gets up during his US Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing to be an Associate Justice on the US Supreme Court, on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, September 4, 2018. - President Donald Trump's newest Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh is expected to face punishing questioning from Democrats this week over his endorsement of presidential immunity and his opposition to abortion. (Photo by Brendan Smialowski / AFP) (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
Judge Brett Kavanaugh (front) listens to Fred Guttenberg (rear), father of Parkland, Florida, shooting victim Jaime Guttenberg, as Kavanaugh gets up during his US Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing to be an Associate Justice on the US Supreme Court, on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, September 4, 2018. - President Donald Trump's newest Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh is expected to face punishing questioning from Democrats this week over his endorsement of presidential immunity and his opposition to abortion. (Photo by Brendan Smialowski / AFP) (Photo credit should read BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)
Fred Guttenberg (L), the father of Jamie Guttenberg, a victim of the February 14, 2018 mass shooting in Parkland, Florida, reaches out to try to shake hands with U.S. Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh during his U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee confirmation hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, U.S., September 4, 2018. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
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Guttenberg thanked Speaker Nancy Pelosi for telling reporters on Thursday that the president should have declared gun violence a national emergency — not the alleged “border crisis.”

Guttenberg has directly criticized Trump on multiple occasions, and he didn’t let the president’s failure to focus on gun violence go unnoticed. Others noted that Trump changed language in his official statement on the Parkland anniversary from “gun violence” to “school violence” when tweeting it out.

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