Virginia Lt. Gov. Justin Fairfax's accuser releases statement on sexual assault allegations

The woman accusing Virginia Lt. Gov. Justin Fairfax (D) of sexual assault detailed the alleged July 2004 incident in a statement released Wednesday through her lawyers.

Vanessa Tyson, an associate professor of politics at Scripps College in Claremont, California, said: “What began as consensual kissing quickly turned into a sexual assault.”

The professor went on to say Fairfax allegedly forced her to perform oral sex on him in a hotel room while they were both attending the 2004 Democratic National Convention in Boston, Massachusetts.  

“To be very clear, I did not want to engage in oral sex with Mr. Fairfax and I never gave any form of consent,” Tyson wrote. “Quite the opposite. I consciously avoided Mr. Fairfax for the remainder of the Convention and I never spoke to him again.”

Fairfax has vehemently denied the allegation, which he claims only resurfaced in the wake of calls for the resignation of Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam (D).

Northam came under fire last week after Big League Politics published a photo from the governor’s medical school yearbook page that appeared to show an individual wearing blackface beside another in Ku Klux Klan robes.

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Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam, left, gestures as his wife, Pam, listens during a news conference in the Governors Mansion at the Capitol in Richmond, Va., Saturday, Feb. 2, 2019. Northam is under fire for a racial photo that appeared in his college yearbook. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam pauses during a news conference in the Governor's Mansion in Richmond, Va., on Saturday, Feb. 2, 2019. Resisting widespread calls for his resignation, Northam on Saturday vowed to remain in office after disavowing a racist photograph that appeared under his name in his 1984 medical school yearbook. (Bob Brown/Richmond Times-Dispatch via AP)
Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam, left, accompanied by his wife, Pam, speaks during a news conference in the Governor's Mansion in Richmond, Va., on Saturday, Feb. 2, 2019. Northam is under fire for a racial photo that appeared in his college yearbook. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam pauses during a news conference in the Governor's Mansion in Richmond, Va., on Saturday, Feb. 2, 2019. Northam is under fire for a racial photo that appeared in his college yearbook. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
ALEXANDRIA, VA - May 21: Democratic candidate for Governor of Virginia, Lieutenant Governor Ralph Northam takes part in a candidate forum put on by Americans for Responsible Solutions at the Hilton Alexandria Old Town on Sunday May 21, 2017 in Alexandria, VA. (Photo by Matt McClain/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
Former U.S. President Barack Obama campaigns in support of Virginia Lieutenant Governor Ralph Northam, Democratic candidate for governor, at a rally with supporters in Richmond, Virginia, U.S. October 19, 2017. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst
Virginia Lieutenant Governor Ralph Northam, who is campaigning to be elected as the state's governor, and his wife Pam, cast their ballots at the East Ocean View Community Center in Norfolk, Virginia, U.S. November 7, 2017. REUTERS/Julia Rendleman
FAIRFAX, VA - APRIL 29: Tom Perriello, left, shakes hands with Ralph Northam at the start of the event. Virginia Democratic Gubernatorial Candidates, Ralph Northam and Tom Perriello held their first debate on Saturday, April 29, 2017 at Lanier Middle School in Fairfax, VA. (Photo by Sarah L. Voisin/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
ARLINGTON, VA - MARCH 08: Virginia Lieutenant Governor Ralph Northam visits Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport to visit with airport workers on Wednesday March 08, 2017 in Arlington, VA. (Photo by Matt McClain/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - JULY 25: Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe, left, and Lt. Gov. Ralph Northam, cheer on the floor of the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia, Pa., on the first day of the Democratic National Convention, July 25, 2016. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
Ralph Northam (R) is sworn in as Virginia's lieutenant governor by retired Judge Glen Tyler in Richmond, Virginia, January 11, 2014. The ceremony marks the first time in a quarter century that Democrats will hold all three of the state's top elective posts: governor, lieutenant governor and attorney general. REUTERS/Mike Theiler (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS)
FALLS CHURCH, VA - OCTOBER 19: Hillary Rodham Clinton, center right in red, stands with the Democratic ticket as she endorses Virginia gubernatorial candidate Terry McAuliffe, far right, at a Women for Terry rallyon October, 19, 2013 in Falls Church, VA. Pictured from left, Sen Mark Herring, Sen. Ralph Northam, Clinton, and McAuliffe. (Photo by Bill O'Leary/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - JULY 25: Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe, left, and Lt. Gov. Ralph Northam, take a selfie on the floor of the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia, Pa., on the first day of the Democratic National Convention, July 25, 2016. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
ARLINGTON, VA - MAY 2: Ralph Northam greets supporters in front of the venue as progressive and labor groups from across the Commonwealth host a forum for him and fellow candidate Tom Perriello to discuss Virginia's 2017 Governor's race on May, 02, 2017 in Arlington, VA. (Photo by Bill O'Leary/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
Virginia Democratic governor-elect Terry McAuliffe (R) celebrates with lieutenant governor-elect Ralph Northam (L) at their election night victory rally in Tyson's Corner, Virginia November 5, 2013. McAuliffe defeated Republican candidate Ken Cuccinelli in today's governor's election in Virginia. REUTERS/Gary Cameron (UNITED STATES - Tags: POLITICS ELECTIONS)
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Lawmakers on both sides of the aisle have called for Northam to step down, which would position Fairfax to take over as the state’s governor.

“Only now, at a time of intense media attention surrounding Virginia politics, has this false claim been raised again,” Fairfax said in a statement on Monday.

In a subsequent statement on Wednesday, before Tyson released her account on the alleged assault, Fairfax described what he called “a consensual encounter with the woman who made the allegation.”

“At no time did she express to me any discomfort or concern about our interactions, neither during that encounter, nor during the months following it, when she stayed in touch with me, nor the past fifteen years,” Fairfax wrote. 

Tyson said she experienced “both deep humiliation and shame” after the alleged assault.

“I did not speak about it for years, and (like most survivors) suppressed those memories and emotions as a necessary means to continue my studies, and to pursue my goal of building a successful career as an academic,” she wrote.

The professor contacted The Washington Post in December 2017 after learning about Fairfax’s successful campaign for lieutenant governor of Virginia. The Post this week confirmed that it had been contacted by a woman who accused Fairfax of sexually assaulting her in 2004. The paper said the woman reached out prior to Fairfax’s inauguration in 2018 and that it hadn’t been able to corroborate either Fairfax’s or the woman’s account.

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Virginia Lt. Gov. Justin E. Fairfax waves to the crowd as he and his family arrive for his inauguration at the Capitol in Richmond, Va., Saturday, Jan. 13, 2018. (AP Photo/P. Kevin Morley)
Democratic candidate for Lt. Gov. Justin Fairfax, gestures during a debate with Republican Virginia State Sen. Jill Vogel, right, at the University of Richmond in Richmond, Va., Thursday, Oct. 5, 2017. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
In this Thursday Oct. 5, 2017 photo Democrat Justin Fairfax gestures during a debate with Republican Virginia State Sen. Jill Vogel, right, at the University of Richmond in Richmond, Va. Fairfax, a former federal prosecutor, and Vogel, a state senator from Fauquier County, are running for lieutenant governor in next month’s election. The post that offers few formal duties other than breaking ties in the state Senate but invariably serves as a launching post for future gubernatorial runs. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
CORRECTS FAIRFAX'S FIRST NAME TO JUSTIN FROM JUSTINE - Democrat Lt. Gov.-elect Justin Fairfax addresses the Ralph Northam For Governor election night party at George Mason University in Fairfax, Va., Tuesday, Nov. 7, 2017. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)
Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam, bottom center, waves to the gallery prior to delivering his State of the Commonwealth address as Lt. Gov. Justin Fairfax, top left, House Speaker Kirk Cox, R-Colonial Heights, top center, and State Sen. Stephen Newman, R-Bedford, applaud before a joint session of the Virginia General Assembly at the Capitol in Richmond, Va., Monday, Jan. 15, 2018. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
Virginia Lt. Gov. Justin Fairfax, left, listens to assistant Senate Crerk, Tara Perkinson, as he prepares to preside over the Senate at the Capitol in Richmond, Va., Monday, Feb. 4, 2019. Virginians are now taking a closer look at Fairfax as he suddenly looms as the successor to Gov. Ralph Northam, whose political future is in jeopardy after a blackface photo was discovered on Northam's personal page in his medical school yearbook. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)
Virginia Lieutenant Governor Justin Fairfax presides over a session of the state senate inside the capital building in dowtown Richmond, on February 4, 2019. - Virginia politics went into further turmoil as the lieutenant governor of the eastern US state, where the governor is under intense pressure to resign, was accused of sexual misconduct. Lieutenant Governor Justin Fairfax, who would take over if Governor Ralph Northam steps down, strongly denied the allegation made by a woman about a sexual encounter they had in a hotel room 15 years ago. (Photo by Logan Cyrus / AFP) (Photo credit should read LOGAN CYRUS/AFP/Getty Images)
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Colleagues of Tyson’s at Stanford University, at which she is a research fellow, also said she told them about the alleged incident last year, prior to the scandal surrounding Northam.

Tyson has retained law firm Katz, Marshall and Banks, which also represented Christine Blasey Ford when she accused then-Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh of sexually assaulting her when they were both in high school. (Kavanaugh was eventually confirmed by the Senate.)

Ford, a psychology professor at Palo Alto University in Northern California, also faced scrutiny and claims that her allegation was politically motivated.

  • This article originally appeared on HuffPost.
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