Poll finds that 48% of Americans have no confidence in President Trump, only 32% view him favorably as person

A new poll has found that 48% of Americans have no confidence "at all" in President Trump, who suffered a major political blow when the historic 35-day government shutdown ended last week.

Merely 35% of people surveyed in the ABC News/Washington Post poll said they have confidence in Trump to make the correct decisions for the country's future. Additionally, only 32% see the former reality TV star favorably as a person, according to the poll which was released at 7 a.m. on Monday.

The poll also found that 37% say that they have no confidence in Trump's nemisis, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi.

Trump, who was found recently to have a job approval rating of 37%, signed a bill on Friday ending the longest government shutdown in U.S. history without securing funding for the border wall he has promised since the presidential campaign.

Congress is also drawing the ire of Americans, with 30% of the people polled saying they have no confidence in Republican lawmakers and 29% saying they have no confidence in Democrats.

Related: Donald Trump and Mike Pence visit MLK Jr. memorial:

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Donald Trump and Mike Pence visit Martin Luther King Jr. memorial
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Donald Trump and Mike Pence visit Martin Luther King Jr. memorial
U.S. President Donald Trump, center, and Vice President Mike Pence, left, arrive at the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Monday, Jan. 21, 2019. Trump and senior Democrats took their first steps toward a possible compromise deal on immigration and border security over the weekend, even as the president ramped up his feud with Speaker Nancy Pelosi with the government shutdown in its fifth week. Photographer: Pete Marovich/Pool via Bloomberg
U.S. President Donald Trump, right, and Vice President Mike Pence visit the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Monday, Jan. 21, 2019. Trump and senior Democrats took their first steps toward a possible compromise deal on immigration and border security over the weekend, even as the president ramped up his feud with Speaker Nancy Pelosi with the government shutdown in its fifth week. Photographer: Pete Marovich/Pool via Bloomberg
U.S. President Donald Trump, center, and Vice President Mike Pence, left, visit the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Monday, Jan. 21, 2019. Trump and senior Democrats took their first steps toward a possible compromise deal on immigration and border security over the weekend, even as the president ramped up his feud with Speaker Nancy Pelosi with the government shutdown in its fifth week. Photographer: Pete Marovich/Pool via Bloomberg
U.S. President Donald Trump, right, and Vice President Mike Pence arrive at the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Monday, Jan. 21, 2019. Trump and senior Democrats took their first steps toward a possible compromise deal on immigration and border security over the weekend, even as the president ramped up his feud with Speaker Nancy Pelosi with the government shutdown in its fifth week. Photographer: Pete Marovich/Pool via Bloomberg
U.S. President Donald Trump, center, and Vice President Mike Pence, left, visit the Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Monday, Jan. 21, 2019. Trump and senior Democrats took their first steps toward a possible compromise deal on immigration and border security over the weekend, even as the president ramped up his feud with Speaker Nancy Pelosi with the government shutdown in its fifth week. Photographer: Pete Marovich/Pool via Bloomberg
U.S. President Donald Trump and U.S. Vice President Mike Pence depart after placing a wreath at the Martin Luther King Memorial in Washington, U.S., January 21, 2019. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
U.S. President Donald Trump and U.S. Vice President Mike Pence depart after placing a wreath at the Martin Luther King Memorial in Washington, U.S., January 21, 2019. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
U.S. President Donald Trump and U.S. Vice President Mike Pence arrive to place a wreath at the Martin Luther King Memorial in Washington, U.S., January 21, 2019. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
U.S. President Donald Trump and U.S. Vice President Mike Pence pause after placing a wreath at the Martin Luther King Memorial in Washington, U.S., January 21, 2019. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
U.S. President Donald Trump speaks as U.S. Vice President Mike Pence watches after placing a wreath at the Martin Luther King Memorial in Washington, U.S., January 21, 2019. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
U.S. President Donald Trump and U.S. Vice President Mike Pence pause after placing a wreath at the Martin Luther King Memorial in Washington, U.S., January 21, 2019. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts
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The poll does not paint a glowing picture of Trump's presidency less than two years before voters will decide whether to give him another four years in the White House. About 50% expected him to do a good job with the deficit, yet just one-third of those polled actually believe he is doing so.

Only 28% of women say in the new poll that they have confidence in Trump to make the right decisions, compared to 43% for men.

The new poll was conducted by phone from Jan. 21 to Jan. 24 in English and Spanish "among a random national sample of 1,001 adults," according to the survey.

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