Two people have died after pigeon dropping infection at Glasgow hospital 

Two deaths at a hospital in Scotland have been reportedly linked to an airborne fungal disease commonly associated with pigeon droppings.

According to the Guardian, the fatalities occurred at Queen Elizabeth University Hospital in Glasgow where it is believed the patients contracted the Cryptococcus infection after the bird droppings somehow made their way into a non-public room containing machinery. 

Though officials declined to share details about the deaths citing confidentiality, one case involving an elderly person may have been caused by other factors, and the other is being investigated, notes the BBC.

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GLASGOW, SCOTLAND - JANUARY 21: Cars are parked outside Queen Elizabeth University Hospital on January 21, 2019 in Glasgow, Scotland. Two patients have died at the Glasgow hospital, after contracting a fungal infection linked to pigeon droppings. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
FILE: An anaesthetist monitors a patient's heart rate and other data displayed on electronic monitors during an operation inside a theater at Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham, part of the University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, in Birmingham, U.K., on Monday, Feb. 20, 2017. As the U.K. government proposes spending 160 million pounds ($207 million) to support medical research and health care we select our best archive images on health. Photographer: Matthew Lloyd/Bloomberg via Getty Images
GLASGOW, SCOTLAND - JANUARY 21: A wall displays The Queen Elizabeth University Hospital outside the hospital on January 21, 2019 in Glasgow, Scotland. Two patients have died at the Glasgow hospital, after contracting a fungal infection linked to pigeon droppings. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
FILE: A member of the medical staff secures his face mask whilst working inside an operating theater at Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham, part of the University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, in Birmingham, U.K., on Monday, Feb. 20, 2017. As the U.K. government proposes spending 160 million pounds ($207 million) to support medical research and health care we select our best archive images on health. Photographer: Matthew Lloyd/Bloomberg via Getty Images
GLASGOW, SCOTLAND - JANUARY 21: A man walks by Queen Elizabeth University Hospital on January 21, 2019 in Glasgow, Scotland. Two patients have died at the Glasgow hospital, after contracting a fungal infection linked to pigeon droppings. (Photo by Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images)
FILE: Medical staff work in the background as a pressure infusor bag hangs from a medical stand inside an operating theater at Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham, part of the University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, in Birmingham, U.K., on Monday, Feb. 20, 2017. As the U.K. government proposes spending 160 million pounds ($207 million) to support medical research and health care we select our best archive images on health. Photographer: Matthew Lloyd/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Scottish Finance Secretary Derek Mackay (second right) watches a teaching session on cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in a simulated ward environment at the teaching and Learning Centre, Queen Elizabeth University Hospital, Glasgow. (Photo by David Cheskin/PA Images via Getty Images)
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A spokesperson for the U.K.’s NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde has since tried to allay fears about the fungus, saying: “The organism is harmless to the vast majority of people and rarely causes disease in humans.” 

In the wake of the deaths, the hospital has cleaned the potentially contaminated room, installed extra air filters in certain areas, and started providing precautionary treatments to some vulnerable patients. 

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