Chelsea Clinton takes on troll taunting her about her parents and Pizzagate

Chelsea Clinton has established a reputation for defending others — including Barron Trump — from cyberbullies. Now she’s sticking up for her own family.

The former first daughter took the time to respond to a Twitter commenter trolling her over the debunked Pizzagate conspiracy theory, which plagued her mother’s 2016 presidential campaign. (To recap: Hillary Clinton’s campaign manager, John Podesta, had his emails hacked, prompting speculation that they contained coded messages about an alleged child sex ring at a Washington, D.C., pizzeria, Comet Ping Pong. Despite being discredited, the rumors resulted in death threats, an incident with an armed man at the pizzeria and a smear campaign against Clinton.)

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WASHINGTON, DC - DECEMBER 05: Comet Ping Pong is seen on Monday Decmmber 05, 2016 in Washington, DC. A man identified as Edgar Maddison Welch was arrested after coming to the restaurant armed. The incident was linked to a series of fake news stories that have been dubbed 'Pizzagate'. (Photo by Matt McClain/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - DECEMBER 05: Jared Peterson leaves a sign outside Comet Ping Pong on Monday Decmmber 05, 2016 in Washington, DC. A man identified as Edgar Maddison Welch was arrested Sunday after coming to the restaurant armed. The incident was linked to a series of fake news stories that have been dubbed 'Pizzagate'. (Photo by Matt McClain/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - DECEMBER 05: Owner of Besta Pizza, Abdel Hammad is interviewed outside his business on Monday Decmmber 05, 2016 in Washington, DC. Hammad talked about an incident at nearby Comet Ping Pong involving Edgar Maddison Welch, who was arrested Sunday after coming to the restaurant armed. The incident was linked to a series of fake news stories that have been dubbed 'Pizzagate'. Hammad said he has received phone calls pertaining to the fake news. (Photo by Matt McClain/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
An evidence photo shows a handgun in the trial of Edgar Welch, 29, of Salisbury, North Carolina, who wielded an assault rifle inside the Comet Ping Pong pizzeria after a fake online "Pizzagate" report that it was a cover for a child abuse ring in Washington, D.C., U.S. on December 4, 2016, in this image released on June 22, 2017. Courtesy U.S. Attorney's Office for the District of Columbia/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY.
An evidence photo shows an assault rifle in the trial of Edgar Welch, 29, of Salisbury, North Carolina, who wielded an assault rifle inside the Comet Ping Pong pizzeria after a fake online "Pizzagate" report that it was a cover for a child abuse ring in Washington, D.C., U.S. on December 4, 2016, in this image released on June 22, 2017.Courtesy U.S. Attorney's Office for the District of Columbia/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY.
An evidence photo shows an assault rifle in the trial of Edgar Welch, 29, of Salisbury, North Carolina, who wielded an assault rifle inside the Comet Ping Pong pizzeria after a fake online "Pizzagate" report that it was a cover for a child abuse ring in Washington, D.C., U.S. on December 4, 2016, in this image released on June 22, 2017. Courtesy U.S. Attorney's Office for the District of Columbia/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS IMAGE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY.
WASHINGTON, DC - DECEMBER 05: A sign is seen outside Comet Ping Pong on Monday Decmmber 05, 2016 in Washington, DC. A man identified as Edgar Maddison Welch was arrested Sunday after coming to the restaurant armed. The incident was linked to a series of fake news stories that have been dubbed 'Pizzagate'. (Photo by Matt McClain/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
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Years later, her daughter is still fending off Pizzagate attacks. When a troll — who commented on her post about New York’s ban on conversion therapy — joked about her “parents still ordering pizza,” the younger Clinton took the kill-them-with-kindness approach while subtly pointing out the troll’s spelling errors. She also threw in a fun fact: The former first family digs cheese pizza.

Twitter users praised Clinton for taking the high road.

It’s not the first time Clinton has responded politely to a troll. In June, she thanked a critic who compared her looks to a horse and donkey, saying she was “flattered by the compliment.”

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