'No slamming!': Trump denies 'tantrum' in shutdown talks

President Trump is disputing Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer’s assertion that he had a “temper tantrum” before walking out of a meeting on border security with Schumer and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi at the White House Wednesday afternoon.

“Cryin Chuck told his favorite lie when he used his standard sound bite that I ’slammed the table & walked out of the room. He had a temper tantrum,’” Trump tweeted on Thursday morning. “Because I knew he would say that, and after Nancy said no to proper Border Security, I politely said bye-bye and left, no slamming!

After the meeting, Schumer told reporters that the president threw a “temper tantrum because he couldn’t get his way.”

RELATED: 6 ways government shutdowns hurt you

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What Happens During a Government Shutdown?

When a spending bill expires before Congress passes a new bill authorizing spending, the federal government shuts down most operations.

With spending stuck in limbo while all parties come to an agreement, the federal government runs out of money, forcing the closure.

During a government shutdown, essential services carry on. These include national security, law enforcement, emergency medical services, air traffic control and more.

But services considered non-essential stop, which can still affect your everyday life.

5 Things That Could be Tough During a Government Shutdown

Each government shutdown is different, but here are some things that could become more difficult or impossible if federal operations are forced to go on hold.

(REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque)

1. Planning a Trip to a National Park or Monument

You can’t go to a national park or monument during a shutdown — they’ll be closed. This includes national zoos and museums, too. According to Vox, the 2013 government shutdown cost $500 million in lost tourism income due to national park closures.

(Photo: Zion National Park; Getty)

2. Getting a Passport

During the last shutdown, the State Department continued passport and visa operations because those functions are funded by fees, not government spending. 

We reached out to the National Passport Information Center back in April when the possibility of a shutdown loomed. The representative we spoke to said it’s unclear how a present-day shutdown would affect services, adding that multiple factors go into determining whether you’ll still be able to obtain a passport during a shutdown.

3. Using Free School Lunch Programs

Free school lunch programs will continue during a government shutdown — as long as it doesn’t last too long. If a shutdown goes on for an extended period, school districts might run out of funds to provide the free meals — as some districts worried would occur during the 2013 shutdown.

(Ricardo Ramirez Buxeda/Orlando Sentinel/TNS via Getty Images)

4. Signing up for New Social Security Benefits

Social Security benefits will continue going out to existing enrollees, but new applications for benefits may have to wait until after the shutdown to be processed.

5. Buying a Home

If you were planning to use a federal loan, like a Federal Housing Administration-insured loan or a Veterans Affairs loan, to purchase a house, the agencies will still process it — depending on a few factors.

During the 2013 government shutdown, the FHA released an FAQ stating it would still process single-family loans, though it warned that it could take extra time because of a reduced staff. Delays could occur for other reasons, like if you need to obtain documents from the IRS.

Are you a veteran? Thankfully, it’s unlikely that a shutdown would affect your VA loans.

6. Your Tax Refund

And, perhaps, the worst of all, depending on the time of year: If you’re waiting for a tax refund from the IRS and the government shuts down, you’ll have to wait until it reopens to get your money.

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“He sort of slammed the table, and when Leader Pelosi said she didn’t agree with the wall, he just walked out and said, ’We have nothing to discuss,’” Schumer said. “He said it was a waste of his time.”

Schumer added: “This was really unfortunate and in my judgment somewhat unbecoming of a presidency.”

Trump is demanding Congress allocate $5.7 billion that would go toward construction of a physical barrier on the U.S. border with Mexico in exchange for reopening the government. Democrats are refusing to do so, and want the government reopened while border negotiations continue.

About 800,000 federal employees, approximately half of whom are working without pay, have been affected by the ongoing shutdown now in its 20th day.

Moments after the White House meeting disintegrated, the president headed to Twitter to vent his frustration.

RELATED: Government shutdown continues

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A visitor looks though a closed entrance door to Federal Hall, due to the partial government shutdown, across from the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) in New York, U.S., on Monday, Jan. 7, 2019. U.S. stocks climbed following last week's rally with investors piling into small-capitalization stocks amid the resumption of trade talks with China. Photographer: Michael Nagle/Bloomberg via Getty Images
UNITED STATES - JANUARY 7: Tourists walk past a sign announces that the National Gallery of Art is closed due to the partial government shut down on Monday, Jan. 7, 2019. The standoff between President Trump and Congress over a spending package to fund nine government agencies reached its 17th day Monday, making this shut down the third-longest on record. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 07: A sign explaining that areas near the National Gallery of Art are closed due to a partial shutdown of the U.S. government is seen, on January 7, 2019 in Washington, DC. The government shutdown is going into its third week with Congressional Democrats and Republicans at a stalemate on a bipartisan solution to President Donald Trump's demands for more money to build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - JANUARY 7: A sign announces that the National Gallery of Art Sculpture Garden and ice rink are closed due to the partial government shut down on Monday, Jan. 7, 2019. The standoff between President Trump and Congress over a spending package to fund nine government agencies reached its 17th day Monday, making this shut down the third-longest on record. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 07: Restrooms at East Potomac Park are closed due to a partial shutdown of the U.S. government, on January 7, 2019 in Washington, DC. The government shutdown is going into its third week with Congressional Democrats and Republicans at a stalemate on a bipartisan solution to President Donald Trump's demands for more money to build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 07: The road that leads to Hains Point at East Potomac Park is closed due to a partial shutdown of the U.S. government, on January 7, 2019 in Washington, DC. The government shutdown is going into its third week with Congressional Democrats and Republicans at a stalemate on a bipartisan solution to President Donald Trump's demands for more money to build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
US President Donald Trump speaks to the media as he arrives at the White House in Washington, DC, on January 6, 2019, after meetings at Camp David. - US President Donald Trump stood firm Sunday on his demand for billions of dollars to fund a border wall with Mexico, claiming 'tremendous' support inside his camp on the contentious issue which has forced a government shutdown now entering its third week.'We have to build the wall,' Trump told reporters as he left the White House for the Camp David presidential retreat. 'It's about safety, it's about security for our country. (Photo by Jim WATSON / AFP) (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
US President Donald Trump speaks to the media as he arrives at the White House in Washington, DC, on January 6, 2019, after meetings at Camp David. - US President Donald Trump stood firm Sunday on his demand for billions of dollars to fund a border wall with Mexico, claiming 'tremendous' support inside his camp on the contentious issue which has forced a government shutdown now entering its third week.'We have to build the wall,' Trump told reporters as he left the White House for the Camp David presidential retreat. 'It's about safety, it's about security for our country. (Photo by Jim WATSON / AFP) (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
US President Donald Trump speaks to the media as he arrives at the White House in Washington, DC, on January 6, 2019, after meetings at Camp David. - US President Donald Trump stood firm Sunday on his demand for billions of dollars to fund a border wall with Mexico, claiming 'tremendous' support inside his camp on the contentious issue which has forced a government shutdown now entering its third week.'We have to build the wall,' Trump told reporters as he left the White House for the Camp David presidential retreat. 'It's about safety, it's about security for our country. (Photo by Jim WATSON / AFP) (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
TOPSHOT - US President Donald Trump speaks as he arrives at the White House in Washington, DC, on January 6, 2019, after meetings at Camp David. - US President Donald Trump stood firm Sunday on his demand for billions of dollars to fund a border wall with Mexico, claiming 'tremendous' support inside his camp on the contentious issue which has forced a government shutdown now entering its third week.'We have to build the wall,' Trump told reporters as he left the White House for the Camp David presidential retreat. 'It's about safety, it's about security for our country. (Photo by Jim WATSON / AFP) (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
Transportation Security Administration officers (TSA) stand screen passengers at the departure area of the Los Angeles International Airport in Los Angeles, California, on 5 January, 2019. - TSA staff are taking sick leave in record numbers since the partial government shutdown forced them to work without pay from December 22, 2018. Shortly after the new Congress was sworn in on January 4, 2019, the House approved legislation to fund homeland security operations until February 8 and several other agencies through September -- but no money for a wall. Trump has said he would veto any bill that does not include funding for the barrier and the Republican-run Senate has said it would not consider anything that does not pass muster with the president. (Photo by Mark RALSTON / AFP) (Photo credit should read MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images)
Transportation Security Administration officers (TSA) stand screen passengers at the departure area of the Los Angeles International Airport in Los Angeles, California, on 5 January, 2019. - TSA staff are taking sick leave in record numbers since the partial government shutdown forced them to work without pay from December 22, 2018. Shortly after the new Congress was sworn in on January 4, 2019, the House approved legislation to fund homeland security operations until February 8 and several other agencies through September -- but no money for a wall. Trump has said he would veto any bill that does not include funding for the barrier and the Republican-run Senate has said it would not consider anything that does not pass muster with the president. (Photo by Mark RALSTON / AFP) (Photo credit should read MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images)
Transportation Security Administration officers (TSA) stand on duty at the departure area of the Los Angeles International Airport in Los Angeles, California, on 5 January, 2019. - TSA staff are taking sick leave in record numbers since the partial government shutdown forced them to work without pay began on Deember 22, 2018. Shortly after the new Congress was sworn in on Thursday, the House approved legislation to fund homeland security operations until February 8 and several other agencies through September -- but no money for a wall. Trump has said he would veto any bill that does not include funding for the barrier and the Republican-run Senate has said it would not consider anything that does not pass muster with the president. (Photo by Mark RALSTON / AFP) (Photo credit should read MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images)
A US Coast Guard vessel patrols New York Harbor waters off Battery Park on January 5, 2019, in New York, as the US government shutdown enters its third week. - While most of the US military is unaffected, about 42,000 Coast Guard members are working without pay. That branch falls under the Department of Homeland Security, not the Pentagon. (Photo by DON EMMERT / AFP) (Photo credit should read DON EMMERT/AFP/Getty Images)
JOSHUA TREE NATIONAL PARK, CA - JANUARY 04: Volunteers Alexandra (R) and Ruth Degen prepare to clean a restroom at Joshua Tree National Park on January 4, 2019 in Joshua Tree National Park, California. Volunteers with 'Friends of Joshua Tree National Park' have been cleaning bathrooms and trash at the park as the park is drastically understaffed during the partial government shutdown. Campgrounds and some roads have been closed at the park due to safety concerns. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
JOSHUA TREE NATIONAL PARK, CA - JANUARY 04: Volunteer Alexandra Degen cleans a restroom at Joshua Tree National Park on January 4, 2019 in Joshua Tree National Park, California. Volunteers with 'Friends of Joshua Tree National Park' have been cleaning bathrooms and trash at the park as the park is drastically understaffed during the partial government shutdown. Campgrounds and some roads have been closed at the park due to safety concerns. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 04: U.S. President Donald Trump (R) speaks as he joined by Rep. Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) (L) in the Rose Garden of the White House on January 4, 2019 in Washington, DC. Trump hosted both Democratic and Republican lawmakers at the White House for the second meeting in three days as the government shutdown heads into its third week. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 04: U.S. President Donald Trump is joined by Vice President Mike Pence while speaking to the media after a meeting with Congressional leaders about ending the partial government shutdown, in the Rose Garden at the White House on January 4, 2019 in Washington, DC. The U.S government is going into the 13th day of a partial shutdown with Republicans and Democrats at odds on agreeing with President Donald Trump's demands for more money to build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
US President Donald Trump addresses a press conference in the Rose Garden of the White House following a meeting with Congressional leaders on the government shutdown, January 4, 2019 in Washington, DC. - Trump said he was prepared to keep the US government closed for a year or more, as he stood firm on his contentious demand for billions of dollars to fund a border wall with Mexico. (Photo by SAUL LOEB / AFP) (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
JOSHUA TREE NATIONAL PARK, CA - JANUARY 04: A sign placed by staff is posted on a temporary barricade at a closed campground at Joshua Tree National Park on January 4, 2019 in Joshua Tree National Park, California. Campgrounds and some roads have been closed at the park due to safety concerns as the park is drastically understaffed during the partial government shutdown. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
A crew from junk removal company 1-800-Got-Junk clears garbage which has been uncollected due to the federal government shutdown, from the Ellipse, a public area south of the White House, January 4, 2019. The shutdown is in its 14th day as newly appointed Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi and other Congressional leaders will be meeting with President Donald Trump at the White House. (Photo by Michael Candelori/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
A sign and a padlock on the door of the Ellipse VIsitor Center south of the White House explain that the facility and the National Christmas Tree site is closed due to the federal government shutdown, in its' 14th day, January 4, 2019. (Photo by Michael Candelori/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
MAMMOTH, WY - JANUARY 3: Visitors board a snow coach for the Old Faithful Snowlodge on January 3, 2019 in Mammoth, Wyoming. Non-Emergency services in Yellowstone National Park have been suspended during the current government shutdown. Xanterra, a private concessionaire in Yellowstone, is paying for grooming of the roads to their lodge at Old Faithful. Xanterra is also helping stock and clean park restrooms during the shutdown. (Photo by William Campbell/Corbis via Getty Images)
YELLOWSTONE, WY - JANUARY 3: A family visits the Terraces Mammoth Hot Springs at Yellowstone National Park on January 3, 2019 in Yellowstone, Wyoming. Non-Emergency services in Yellowstone National Park have been suspended during the current government shutdown. Visitors are still allowed access to the parks attractions but services are limited. (Photo by William Campbell/Corbis via Getty Images)
YELLOWSTONE, WY - JANUARY 3: The parking lot and changing area at Boiling River is closed on January 3, 2019 in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. While visitors can still access the river, non-emergency services in Yellowstone National Park have been suspended during the current government shutdown. (Photo by William Campbell/Corbis via Getty Images)
YELLOWSTONE, WY - JANUARY 3: The Visitor Center, typically crowded with guests and tourists, is closed on January 3, 2019 Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. Non-Emergency services in Yellowstone National Park have been suspended during the current government shutdown. (Photo by William Campbell/Corbis via Getty Images)
GARDINER, MT - JANUARY 3: A car drives through the northern entrance to Yellowstone National Park on January 3, 2019 in Gardiner, Montana. Pay stations at the park entrances is currently unstaffed, as non-emergency services in Yellowstone National Park have been suspended during the current government shutdown, and visitors can enter the park without paying fees. (Photo by William Campbell/Corbis via Getty Images)
GARDINER, MT - JANUARY 3: A car drives through the northern entrance to Yellowstone National Park on January 3, 2019 in Gardiner, Montana. Pay stations at the park entrances is currently unstaffed, as non-emergency services in Yellowstone National Park have been suspended during the current government shutdown, and visitors can enter the park without paying fees. (Photo by William Campbell/Corbis via Getty Images)
Signs placed by staff at a closed campground in the Joshua Tree National Park after the federal government's partial shutdown caused park rangers to stay home and campgrounds to be shut, at the park in California on January 3, 2019. - US President Donald Trump warned the US federal government may not fully reopen any time soon, as he stood firm on his demand for billions of dollars in funding for a border wall with Mexico. (Photo by Mark RALSTON / AFP) (Photo credit should read MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images)
TOPSHOT - A closed and blocked campground (L) at the Joshua Tree National Park after the federal government's partial shutdown caused park rangers to stay home and campgrounds to be shut, at the park in California on January 3, 2019. - US President Donald Trump warned the US federal government may not fully reopen any time soon, as he stood firm on his demand for billions of dollars in funding for a border wall with Mexico. (Photo by Mark RALSTON / AFP) (Photo credit should read MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images)
Tourists drive past the closed entrance ticket station of the Joshua Tree National Park after the federal government's partial shutdown caused park rangers to stay home and campgrounds to be shut, at the park in California, on January 3, 2019. - US President Donald Trump warned the US federal government may not fully reopen any time soon, as he stood firm on his demand for billions of dollars in funding for a border wall with Mexico. (Photo by Mark RALSTON / AFP) (Photo credit should read MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images)
Pedestrians walk beyond a sign announcing national park closure due to a government shutdown next to a 'Road Closed' sign at the entrance to Fort Point in the Golden Gate National Recreation Area in San Francisco, California, U.S., on Wednesday, Jan. 2, 2019. Congressional leaders were unable to strike a deal to end a partial shutdown of the federal government at a meeting with Donald Trump on Wednesday, and the president invited them to return to the White House on Friday for further negotiations. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A cyclist takes a photograph while sitting next to a sign announcing national park closure due to a government shutdown and a 'Road Closed' sign at the entrance to Fort Point in the Golden Gate National Recreation Area in San Francisco, California, U.S., on Wednesday, Jan. 2, 2019. Congressional leaders were unable to strike a deal to end a partial shutdown of the federal government at a meeting with Donald Trump on Wednesday, and the president invited them to return to the White House on Friday for further negotiations. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A man uses a smartphone to take a selfie photograph while standing next to a sign announcing national park closure due to a government shutdown and a 'Road Closed' sign at the entrance to Fort Point in the Golden Gate National Recreation Area in San Francisco, California, U.S., on Wednesday, Jan. 2, 2019. Congressional leaders were unable to strike a deal to end a partial shutdown of the federal government at a meeting with Donald Trump on Wednesday, and the president invited them to return to the White House on Friday for further negotiations. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
WASHINGTON, Jan. 2, 2019 -- People stand in front of the closed doors of the Smithsonian Institution Building's visitor center in Washington D.C., the United States, on Jan. 2, 2019. The 19 Smithsonian museums and the National Zoo in Washington D.C. closed their doors on Wednesday as the partial U.S. government shutdown dragged on.?(Xinhua/Liu Jie) (Xinhua/Liu Jie via Getty Images)
Full garbage cans sit at Golden Gate National Recreation Park in San Francisco, California, U.S., on Wednesday, Jan. 2, 2019. Congressional leaders were unable to strike a deal to end a partial shutdown of the federal government at a meeting with Donald Trump on Wednesday, and the president invited them to return to the White House on Friday for further negotiations. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Garbage sits in a parking lot at Golden Gate National Recreation Park in San Francisco, California, U.S., on Wednesday, Jan. 2, 2019. Congressional leaders were unable to strike a deal to end a partial shutdown of the federal government at a meeting with Donald Trump on Wednesday, and the president invited them to return to the White House on Friday for further negotiations. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Full garbage cans sit at Golden Gate National Recreation Park in San Francisco, California, U.S., on Wednesday, Jan. 2, 2019. Congressional leaders were unable to strike a deal to end a partial shutdown of the federal government at a meeting with Donald Trump on Wednesday, and the president invited them to return to the White House on Friday for further negotiations. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Full garbage cans sit at Golden Gate National Recreation Park in San Francisco, California, U.S., on Wednesday, Jan. 2, 2019. Congressional leaders were unable to strike a deal to end a partial shutdown of the federal government at a meeting with Donald Trump on Wednesday, and the president invited them to return to the White House on Friday for further negotiations. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Visitors walk past full garbage cans at Golden Gate National Recreation Park in San Francisco, California, U.S., on Wednesday, Jan. 2, 2019. Congressional leaders were unable to strike a deal to end a partial shutdown of the federal government at a meeting with Donald Trump on Wednesday, and the president invited them to return to the White House on Friday for further negotiations. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Full garbage cans sit at Golden Gate National Recreation Park in San Francisco, California, U.S., on Wednesday, Jan. 2, 2019. Congressional leaders were unable to strike a deal to end a partial shutdown of the federal government at a meeting with Donald Trump on Wednesday, and the president invited them to return to the White House on Friday for further negotiations. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
NEW YORK, NEW YORK - JANUARY 02: A sign informs visitors of the closing of Federal Hall as the partial government shutdown continues on January 02, 2019 in New York City. As President Donald Trump continues to insist on money to build a wall along the Southern border of the United States, the partial government shutdown and the standoff with Democrats continues. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
The White House is seen in the background, as trash lays uncollected on the National Mall due to the partial shutdown of the US government on January 2, 2019 in Washington, DC. - President Donald Trump warned Wednesday the US federal government may not fully reopen any time soon, as he stood firm on his demand for billions of dollars in funding for a border wall with Mexico. Addressing a cabinet meeting on the 12th day of the partial shutdown, Trump warned it 'could be a long time' before the impasse is resolved. (Photo by Andrew Caballero-Reynolds / AFP) (Photo credit should read ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP/Getty Images)
The White House is seen in the background as people bike past trash uncollected on the National Mall, due to the partial shutdown of the US government on January 2, 2019 in Washington, DC. - President Donald Trump warned Wednesday the US federal government may not fully reopen any time soon, as he stood firm on his demand for billions of dollars in funding for a border wall with Mexico. Addressing a cabinet meeting on the 12th day of the partial shutdown, Trump warned it 'could be a long time' before the impasse is resolved. (Photo by Andrew Caballero-Reynolds / AFP) (Photo credit should read ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP/Getty Images)
A young girl reads a sign posted on the door of The National Museum of African American History stating that all Smithsonian Museums are closed due to the partial shutdown of the US government on January 2, 2019 in Washington, DC. - President Donald Trump warned Wednesday the US federal government may not fully reopen any time soon, as he stood firm on his demand for billions of dollars in funding for a border wall with Mexico. Addressing a cabinet meeting on the 12th day of the partial shutdown, Trump warned it 'could be a long time' before the impasse is resolved. (Photo by Andrew Caballero-Reynolds / AFP) (Photo credit should read ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP/Getty Images)
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“Just left a meeting with Chuck and Nancy, a total waste of time,” Trump tweeted. “I asked what is going to happen in 30 days if I quickly open things up, are you going to approve Border Security which includes a Wall or Steel Barrier? Nancy said, NO. I said bye-bye, nothing else works!”

The president is heading to McAllen, Texas, on Thursday to showcase what he claims is a humanitarian crisis along the U.S. southern border.

Hours before their abruptly adjourned sit-down, Schumer and Pelosi appeared alongside nearly two-dozen furloughed government employees at a press conference. The federal workers were asked by reporter to raise their hand if they supported the president’s position on the wall, as Trump has repeatedly claimed. None of them did.

“This is an example of the president being almost delusionary,” Pelosi said. “He says to us, ‘Workers are calling me saying, I’ll stay out without a paycheck, as long as it takes.’ And it’s like, well, who? Give us names.”

Speaking to reporters inside the Oval Office, Trump suggested the support is being expressed to him via social media.

“The beautiful thing is, with social media, the world can write to you,” the president said. “You take a look at social media, so many of those people are saying, ‘It’s very hard for me, it’s very hard for my family, but, Mr. President, you’re doing the right thing.’”

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