The 'doomsday' scenario: Here's what happens if the shutdown drags on

The country would face an economic hellscape if the government shutdown last "months or even years," as the president has suggested it might, experts tell NBC News.

The doomsday scenario might be unlikely — the longest the federal government has ever shut down is 21 days, a record that will fall if the current closure lasts until Saturday — but it is chilling.

"We'll be in no man's land," Mark Zandi, chief economist at Moody's Analytics, told NBC News.

If the worst were to happen, experts say the devastating impact would be widespread:

  • 38 million low-income Americans lose food stamps
  • 6 million face an uncertain timetable for collecting tax refunds
  • 2 million without rental assistance and facing possible eviction
  • 800,000 paycheck-less federal employees plunged into dire financial straits
  • Shuttered parks and museums while overstressed airports cause tourism to tank
  • Federal court system slows to a crawl
  • Disaster relief money doesn't get to storm-ravaged areas
  • Lapsed FDA and EPA inspections lead to dangerous outbreaks
  • Private companies looking to go public are stuck in limbo
  • Stock market plummets

The end isn't near — yet. But If the standoff persists — talks blew up at the White House on Wednesday — and Congress and President Donald Trump can't reach a deal on raising the debt ceiling in a few months, "it's game over — you'll have a pretty severe recession," Zandi said, adding that given the trade war with China, and Brexit looming, "you could start seeing some pretty dark scenarios" worldwide.

WITHOUT FOOD, HOMES

By the end of February, the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP, run by the Department of Agriculture, would be out of funding — meaning almost 40 million low-income Americans could find themselves struggling to pay for food, said Joseph Brusuelas, chief economist for the accounting firm RSM US.

The Department of Housing and Urban Development, meanwhile, has already seen 1,150 contracts with private landlords housing low-income tenants lapse. Another 500 will expire by the end of this month, and another 550 by the end of February, the agency says.

Funding for rental assistance for millions of tenants could be at risk as soon as next month.

"The near-term impact is people getting evicted, having their heat turned off and not having enough food," Brusuelas said.

Drawn out over time, that could amount to a sizable hit on the GDP. Loss of the SNAP benefits could mean $60 billion less in direct spending in a year, and indirect spending of another $48 billion, which could shave a full percentage point off the country's economic growth, he explained.

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A visitor looks though a closed entrance door to Federal Hall, due to the partial government shutdown, across from the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) in New York, U.S., on Monday, Jan. 7, 2019. U.S. stocks climbed following last week's rally with investors piling into small-capitalization stocks amid the resumption of trade talks with China. Photographer: Michael Nagle/Bloomberg via Getty Images
UNITED STATES - JANUARY 7: Tourists walk past a sign announces that the National Gallery of Art is closed due to the partial government shut down on Monday, Jan. 7, 2019. The standoff between President Trump and Congress over a spending package to fund nine government agencies reached its 17th day Monday, making this shut down the third-longest on record. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 07: A sign explaining that areas near the National Gallery of Art are closed due to a partial shutdown of the U.S. government is seen, on January 7, 2019 in Washington, DC. The government shutdown is going into its third week with Congressional Democrats and Republicans at a stalemate on a bipartisan solution to President Donald Trump's demands for more money to build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - JANUARY 7: A sign announces that the National Gallery of Art Sculpture Garden and ice rink are closed due to the partial government shut down on Monday, Jan. 7, 2019. The standoff between President Trump and Congress over a spending package to fund nine government agencies reached its 17th day Monday, making this shut down the third-longest on record. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 07: Restrooms at East Potomac Park are closed due to a partial shutdown of the U.S. government, on January 7, 2019 in Washington, DC. The government shutdown is going into its third week with Congressional Democrats and Republicans at a stalemate on a bipartisan solution to President Donald Trump's demands for more money to build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 07: The road that leads to Hains Point at East Potomac Park is closed due to a partial shutdown of the U.S. government, on January 7, 2019 in Washington, DC. The government shutdown is going into its third week with Congressional Democrats and Republicans at a stalemate on a bipartisan solution to President Donald Trump's demands for more money to build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
US President Donald Trump speaks to the media as he arrives at the White House in Washington, DC, on January 6, 2019, after meetings at Camp David. - US President Donald Trump stood firm Sunday on his demand for billions of dollars to fund a border wall with Mexico, claiming 'tremendous' support inside his camp on the contentious issue which has forced a government shutdown now entering its third week.'We have to build the wall,' Trump told reporters as he left the White House for the Camp David presidential retreat. 'It's about safety, it's about security for our country. (Photo by Jim WATSON / AFP) (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
US President Donald Trump speaks to the media as he arrives at the White House in Washington, DC, on January 6, 2019, after meetings at Camp David. - US President Donald Trump stood firm Sunday on his demand for billions of dollars to fund a border wall with Mexico, claiming 'tremendous' support inside his camp on the contentious issue which has forced a government shutdown now entering its third week.'We have to build the wall,' Trump told reporters as he left the White House for the Camp David presidential retreat. 'It's about safety, it's about security for our country. (Photo by Jim WATSON / AFP) (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
US President Donald Trump speaks to the media as he arrives at the White House in Washington, DC, on January 6, 2019, after meetings at Camp David. - US President Donald Trump stood firm Sunday on his demand for billions of dollars to fund a border wall with Mexico, claiming 'tremendous' support inside his camp on the contentious issue which has forced a government shutdown now entering its third week.'We have to build the wall,' Trump told reporters as he left the White House for the Camp David presidential retreat. 'It's about safety, it's about security for our country. (Photo by Jim WATSON / AFP) (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
TOPSHOT - US President Donald Trump speaks as he arrives at the White House in Washington, DC, on January 6, 2019, after meetings at Camp David. - US President Donald Trump stood firm Sunday on his demand for billions of dollars to fund a border wall with Mexico, claiming 'tremendous' support inside his camp on the contentious issue which has forced a government shutdown now entering its third week.'We have to build the wall,' Trump told reporters as he left the White House for the Camp David presidential retreat. 'It's about safety, it's about security for our country. (Photo by Jim WATSON / AFP) (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
Transportation Security Administration officers (TSA) stand screen passengers at the departure area of the Los Angeles International Airport in Los Angeles, California, on 5 January, 2019. - TSA staff are taking sick leave in record numbers since the partial government shutdown forced them to work without pay from December 22, 2018. Shortly after the new Congress was sworn in on January 4, 2019, the House approved legislation to fund homeland security operations until February 8 and several other agencies through September -- but no money for a wall. Trump has said he would veto any bill that does not include funding for the barrier and the Republican-run Senate has said it would not consider anything that does not pass muster with the president. (Photo by Mark RALSTON / AFP) (Photo credit should read MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images)
Transportation Security Administration officers (TSA) stand screen passengers at the departure area of the Los Angeles International Airport in Los Angeles, California, on 5 January, 2019. - TSA staff are taking sick leave in record numbers since the partial government shutdown forced them to work without pay from December 22, 2018. Shortly after the new Congress was sworn in on January 4, 2019, the House approved legislation to fund homeland security operations until February 8 and several other agencies through September -- but no money for a wall. Trump has said he would veto any bill that does not include funding for the barrier and the Republican-run Senate has said it would not consider anything that does not pass muster with the president. (Photo by Mark RALSTON / AFP) (Photo credit should read MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images)
Transportation Security Administration officers (TSA) stand on duty at the departure area of the Los Angeles International Airport in Los Angeles, California, on 5 January, 2019. - TSA staff are taking sick leave in record numbers since the partial government shutdown forced them to work without pay began on Deember 22, 2018. Shortly after the new Congress was sworn in on Thursday, the House approved legislation to fund homeland security operations until February 8 and several other agencies through September -- but no money for a wall. Trump has said he would veto any bill that does not include funding for the barrier and the Republican-run Senate has said it would not consider anything that does not pass muster with the president. (Photo by Mark RALSTON / AFP) (Photo credit should read MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images)
A US Coast Guard vessel patrols New York Harbor waters off Battery Park on January 5, 2019, in New York, as the US government shutdown enters its third week. - While most of the US military is unaffected, about 42,000 Coast Guard members are working without pay. That branch falls under the Department of Homeland Security, not the Pentagon. (Photo by DON EMMERT / AFP) (Photo credit should read DON EMMERT/AFP/Getty Images)
JOSHUA TREE NATIONAL PARK, CA - JANUARY 04: Volunteers Alexandra (R) and Ruth Degen prepare to clean a restroom at Joshua Tree National Park on January 4, 2019 in Joshua Tree National Park, California. Volunteers with 'Friends of Joshua Tree National Park' have been cleaning bathrooms and trash at the park as the park is drastically understaffed during the partial government shutdown. Campgrounds and some roads have been closed at the park due to safety concerns. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
JOSHUA TREE NATIONAL PARK, CA - JANUARY 04: Volunteer Alexandra Degen cleans a restroom at Joshua Tree National Park on January 4, 2019 in Joshua Tree National Park, California. Volunteers with 'Friends of Joshua Tree National Park' have been cleaning bathrooms and trash at the park as the park is drastically understaffed during the partial government shutdown. Campgrounds and some roads have been closed at the park due to safety concerns. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 04: U.S. President Donald Trump (R) speaks as he joined by Rep. Kevin McCarthy (R-CA) (L) in the Rose Garden of the White House on January 4, 2019 in Washington, DC. Trump hosted both Democratic and Republican lawmakers at the White House for the second meeting in three days as the government shutdown heads into its third week. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 04: U.S. President Donald Trump is joined by Vice President Mike Pence while speaking to the media after a meeting with Congressional leaders about ending the partial government shutdown, in the Rose Garden at the White House on January 4, 2019 in Washington, DC. The U.S government is going into the 13th day of a partial shutdown with Republicans and Democrats at odds on agreeing with President Donald Trump's demands for more money to build a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
US President Donald Trump addresses a press conference in the Rose Garden of the White House following a meeting with Congressional leaders on the government shutdown, January 4, 2019 in Washington, DC. - Trump said he was prepared to keep the US government closed for a year or more, as he stood firm on his contentious demand for billions of dollars to fund a border wall with Mexico. (Photo by SAUL LOEB / AFP) (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)
JOSHUA TREE NATIONAL PARK, CA - JANUARY 04: A sign placed by staff is posted on a temporary barricade at a closed campground at Joshua Tree National Park on January 4, 2019 in Joshua Tree National Park, California. Campgrounds and some roads have been closed at the park due to safety concerns as the park is drastically understaffed during the partial government shutdown. (Photo by Mario Tama/Getty Images)
A crew from junk removal company 1-800-Got-Junk clears garbage which has been uncollected due to the federal government shutdown, from the Ellipse, a public area south of the White House, January 4, 2019. The shutdown is in its 14th day as newly appointed Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi and other Congressional leaders will be meeting with President Donald Trump at the White House. (Photo by Michael Candelori/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
A sign and a padlock on the door of the Ellipse VIsitor Center south of the White House explain that the facility and the National Christmas Tree site is closed due to the federal government shutdown, in its' 14th day, January 4, 2019. (Photo by Michael Candelori/NurPhoto via Getty Images)
MAMMOTH, WY - JANUARY 3: Visitors board a snow coach for the Old Faithful Snowlodge on January 3, 2019 in Mammoth, Wyoming. Non-Emergency services in Yellowstone National Park have been suspended during the current government shutdown. Xanterra, a private concessionaire in Yellowstone, is paying for grooming of the roads to their lodge at Old Faithful. Xanterra is also helping stock and clean park restrooms during the shutdown. (Photo by William Campbell/Corbis via Getty Images)
YELLOWSTONE, WY - JANUARY 3: A family visits the Terraces Mammoth Hot Springs at Yellowstone National Park on January 3, 2019 in Yellowstone, Wyoming. Non-Emergency services in Yellowstone National Park have been suspended during the current government shutdown. Visitors are still allowed access to the parks attractions but services are limited. (Photo by William Campbell/Corbis via Getty Images)
YELLOWSTONE, WY - JANUARY 3: The parking lot and changing area at Boiling River is closed on January 3, 2019 in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. While visitors can still access the river, non-emergency services in Yellowstone National Park have been suspended during the current government shutdown. (Photo by William Campbell/Corbis via Getty Images)
YELLOWSTONE, WY - JANUARY 3: The Visitor Center, typically crowded with guests and tourists, is closed on January 3, 2019 Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. Non-Emergency services in Yellowstone National Park have been suspended during the current government shutdown. (Photo by William Campbell/Corbis via Getty Images)
GARDINER, MT - JANUARY 3: A car drives through the northern entrance to Yellowstone National Park on January 3, 2019 in Gardiner, Montana. Pay stations at the park entrances is currently unstaffed, as non-emergency services in Yellowstone National Park have been suspended during the current government shutdown, and visitors can enter the park without paying fees. (Photo by William Campbell/Corbis via Getty Images)
GARDINER, MT - JANUARY 3: A car drives through the northern entrance to Yellowstone National Park on January 3, 2019 in Gardiner, Montana. Pay stations at the park entrances is currently unstaffed, as non-emergency services in Yellowstone National Park have been suspended during the current government shutdown, and visitors can enter the park without paying fees. (Photo by William Campbell/Corbis via Getty Images)
Signs placed by staff at a closed campground in the Joshua Tree National Park after the federal government's partial shutdown caused park rangers to stay home and campgrounds to be shut, at the park in California on January 3, 2019. - US President Donald Trump warned the US federal government may not fully reopen any time soon, as he stood firm on his demand for billions of dollars in funding for a border wall with Mexico. (Photo by Mark RALSTON / AFP) (Photo credit should read MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images)
TOPSHOT - A closed and blocked campground (L) at the Joshua Tree National Park after the federal government's partial shutdown caused park rangers to stay home and campgrounds to be shut, at the park in California on January 3, 2019. - US President Donald Trump warned the US federal government may not fully reopen any time soon, as he stood firm on his demand for billions of dollars in funding for a border wall with Mexico. (Photo by Mark RALSTON / AFP) (Photo credit should read MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images)
Tourists drive past the closed entrance ticket station of the Joshua Tree National Park after the federal government's partial shutdown caused park rangers to stay home and campgrounds to be shut, at the park in California, on January 3, 2019. - US President Donald Trump warned the US federal government may not fully reopen any time soon, as he stood firm on his demand for billions of dollars in funding for a border wall with Mexico. (Photo by Mark RALSTON / AFP) (Photo credit should read MARK RALSTON/AFP/Getty Images)
Pedestrians walk beyond a sign announcing national park closure due to a government shutdown next to a 'Road Closed' sign at the entrance to Fort Point in the Golden Gate National Recreation Area in San Francisco, California, U.S., on Wednesday, Jan. 2, 2019. Congressional leaders were unable to strike a deal to end a partial shutdown of the federal government at a meeting with Donald Trump on Wednesday, and the president invited them to return to the White House on Friday for further negotiations. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A cyclist takes a photograph while sitting next to a sign announcing national park closure due to a government shutdown and a 'Road Closed' sign at the entrance to Fort Point in the Golden Gate National Recreation Area in San Francisco, California, U.S., on Wednesday, Jan. 2, 2019. Congressional leaders were unable to strike a deal to end a partial shutdown of the federal government at a meeting with Donald Trump on Wednesday, and the president invited them to return to the White House on Friday for further negotiations. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A man uses a smartphone to take a selfie photograph while standing next to a sign announcing national park closure due to a government shutdown and a 'Road Closed' sign at the entrance to Fort Point in the Golden Gate National Recreation Area in San Francisco, California, U.S., on Wednesday, Jan. 2, 2019. Congressional leaders were unable to strike a deal to end a partial shutdown of the federal government at a meeting with Donald Trump on Wednesday, and the president invited them to return to the White House on Friday for further negotiations. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
WASHINGTON, Jan. 2, 2019 -- People stand in front of the closed doors of the Smithsonian Institution Building's visitor center in Washington D.C., the United States, on Jan. 2, 2019. The 19 Smithsonian museums and the National Zoo in Washington D.C. closed their doors on Wednesday as the partial U.S. government shutdown dragged on.?(Xinhua/Liu Jie) (Xinhua/Liu Jie via Getty Images)
Full garbage cans sit at Golden Gate National Recreation Park in San Francisco, California, U.S., on Wednesday, Jan. 2, 2019. Congressional leaders were unable to strike a deal to end a partial shutdown of the federal government at a meeting with Donald Trump on Wednesday, and the president invited them to return to the White House on Friday for further negotiations. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Garbage sits in a parking lot at Golden Gate National Recreation Park in San Francisco, California, U.S., on Wednesday, Jan. 2, 2019. Congressional leaders were unable to strike a deal to end a partial shutdown of the federal government at a meeting with Donald Trump on Wednesday, and the president invited them to return to the White House on Friday for further negotiations. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Full garbage cans sit at Golden Gate National Recreation Park in San Francisco, California, U.S., on Wednesday, Jan. 2, 2019. Congressional leaders were unable to strike a deal to end a partial shutdown of the federal government at a meeting with Donald Trump on Wednesday, and the president invited them to return to the White House on Friday for further negotiations. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Full garbage cans sit at Golden Gate National Recreation Park in San Francisco, California, U.S., on Wednesday, Jan. 2, 2019. Congressional leaders were unable to strike a deal to end a partial shutdown of the federal government at a meeting with Donald Trump on Wednesday, and the president invited them to return to the White House on Friday for further negotiations. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Visitors walk past full garbage cans at Golden Gate National Recreation Park in San Francisco, California, U.S., on Wednesday, Jan. 2, 2019. Congressional leaders were unable to strike a deal to end a partial shutdown of the federal government at a meeting with Donald Trump on Wednesday, and the president invited them to return to the White House on Friday for further negotiations. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Full garbage cans sit at Golden Gate National Recreation Park in San Francisco, California, U.S., on Wednesday, Jan. 2, 2019. Congressional leaders were unable to strike a deal to end a partial shutdown of the federal government at a meeting with Donald Trump on Wednesday, and the president invited them to return to the White House on Friday for further negotiations. Photographer: David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images
NEW YORK, NEW YORK - JANUARY 02: A sign informs visitors of the closing of Federal Hall as the partial government shutdown continues on January 02, 2019 in New York City. As President Donald Trump continues to insist on money to build a wall along the Southern border of the United States, the partial government shutdown and the standoff with Democrats continues. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
The White House is seen in the background, as trash lays uncollected on the National Mall due to the partial shutdown of the US government on January 2, 2019 in Washington, DC. - President Donald Trump warned Wednesday the US federal government may not fully reopen any time soon, as he stood firm on his demand for billions of dollars in funding for a border wall with Mexico. Addressing a cabinet meeting on the 12th day of the partial shutdown, Trump warned it 'could be a long time' before the impasse is resolved. (Photo by Andrew Caballero-Reynolds / AFP) (Photo credit should read ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP/Getty Images)
The White House is seen in the background as people bike past trash uncollected on the National Mall, due to the partial shutdown of the US government on January 2, 2019 in Washington, DC. - President Donald Trump warned Wednesday the US federal government may not fully reopen any time soon, as he stood firm on his demand for billions of dollars in funding for a border wall with Mexico. Addressing a cabinet meeting on the 12th day of the partial shutdown, Trump warned it 'could be a long time' before the impasse is resolved. (Photo by Andrew Caballero-Reynolds / AFP) (Photo credit should read ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP/Getty Images)
A young girl reads a sign posted on the door of The National Museum of African American History stating that all Smithsonian Museums are closed due to the partial shutdown of the US government on January 2, 2019 in Washington, DC. - President Donald Trump warned Wednesday the US federal government may not fully reopen any time soon, as he stood firm on his demand for billions of dollars in funding for a border wall with Mexico. Addressing a cabinet meeting on the 12th day of the partial shutdown, Trump warned it 'could be a long time' before the impasse is resolved. (Photo by Andrew Caballero-Reynolds / AFP) (Photo credit should read ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP/Getty Images)
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Others might find themselves with less money in their pockets.

The IRS has said it won't be able to pay tax refunds during the shutdown, although the Office of Management and Budget said on Monday that it would. Less than 10,000 workers — about 12 percent of IRS staff — are working during the shutdown.

The agency is coming up with a plan to call back more employees, but they'll face an avalanche of backed-up work — by Feb. 2 of last year, the agency had already received over 18 million returns and processed 6.1 million refunds.

"The people who are waiting on those refunds could face some real consequences," said Michael Pearce, senior U.S. economist at Capital Economics.

Then there are the 800,000 government employees who aren't getting paid during the shutdown — even though about half of them still have to work.

"Workers are going to to start walking out and find better paying jobs," Brusuelas said. If they don't, some will be in danger of not being able to pay their rents or mortgages and losing their homes — creating a drag on the economy.

TOURISM DEVASTATED

No-shows by airport workers — including TSA agents and air traffic controllers — would mean delays and canceled flights, hurting business dealings and tourism.

Tourism would also continue to fall at national parks, a third of which were closed when the shutdown went into effect. Others were kept open — but, without staffing, human waste has piled up in bathrooms and along popular trails.

Some parks are planning to stay open by tapping into collection fees that were meant to be used for future park projects. Raiding those funds is unsustainable and will hamper future development plans, said Emily Douce, director of budget and appropriations for the National Parks Conservation Association.

In the meantime, parks are losing the $400,000 in daily fees they typically collect — and neighboring communities aren't benefiting from the average $20 million a day that visitors spend there.

PUBLIC IN DANGER

The Food and Drug Administration has already stopped most food inspections, raising the risk of salmonella, E. coli and listeria outbreaks.

"That puts our food supply at risk," said Sarah Sorscher, deputy director of regulatory affairs at the Center for Science in the Public Interest, a consumer advocacy group.

The Environmental Protection Agency, where only 700 of 13,000 employees are working during the shutdown, has scaled back inspections, with senior officials focusing only on properties where "the threat to human life or property is imminent."

Areas that have already been affected by hurricanes and storms are facing additional problems because of the shutdown, with emergency recovery funds reportedly tied up in bureaucratic red tape.

It seems unimaginable, but if the impasse continues into October, more vital federal agencies would be forced to shut down, and new dangers would loom. Among the agencies that would turn their lights off is the Department of Health and Human Services and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

A more immediate worry: The federal court system will run out of money by Jan. 18, and will have to cut back operations.

STOCK SHOCK

The longer the shutdown goes on, the more likely it is to affect the stock market, experts said.

Analysts had been looking forward to a string of valuable multibillion companies that were expected to go public early this year. But now, as many as 40 initial public offerings are backlogged because the Securities and Exchange Commission doesn't have the staff to review them.

"The market was waiting for this huge avalanche of IPOs," said John Coffee Jr., director of the Center on Corporate Governance at Columbia Law School. "All of this stuff is on hold. The market is fluctuating wildly, and this is going to remove a stimulus."

Even with no end to the shutdown in sight, Brusuelas predicted that public outrage will lead to one soon enough.

"Workers are going to start walking out," he said. "People will take to the streets."

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