Tlaib apologizes - for 'distraction,' not for cursing Trump or impeachment charge

Democratic Rep. Rashida Tlaib apologized Tuesday for causing a "distraction" by calling President Donald Trump a "motherf-----" last week.

At a progressive event after her swearing-in ceremony on Thursday, the newly elected congresswoman from Michigan was recorded saying "we're gonna go in there and we're gonna impeach the motherf-----!"

Responding to the ensuing controversy soon after, Tlaib stood by her remarks, saying she is for impeaching Trump.

"I ran on that," she said. "It's probably exactly how my grandmother, if she was alive, would say it."

On Tuesday, Tlaib was asked if she had any regrets about the comments.

"What I can tell you is that I am a person that is authentically me," she said. "I'm very passionate about fighting for all of us, and the use of that language, you know, was a teachable moment for me. And I understand I am a member of Congress, and I don't want anything that I do or say distract us. And that's the only thing I will apologize for, is that it was a distraction."

She added that she has "a right to be this passionate, this upset."

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Rep. Rashida Tlaib (D-MI)
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Rep. Rashida Tlaib (D-MI)

In this Nov. 6, 2008 file photo, Rashida Tlaib, a Democrat, is photographed outside the Michigan Capitol in Lansing, Mich. The Michigan primary victory of Tlaib, who is expected to become the first Muslim woman and Palestinian-American to serve in the U.S. Congress, is rippling across the Middle East. In the West Bank village where Tlaib’s mother was born, residents are greeting the news with a mixture of pride and hope that she will take on a U.S. administration widely seen as hostile to the Palestinian cause.

(AP Photo/Al Goldis, File)

In this Wednesday, Aug. 8, 2018 photo, Fadwa Tlaib, an aunt of Rashida Tlaib points to a young Rashida in a 1987 picture with her mother Fatima and brother Nader, at the family house, in the West Bank village of Beit Ur al-Foqa. The Michigan primary victory of Tlaib, who is expected to become the first Muslim woman and Palestinian-American to serve in the U.S. Congress, is rippling across the Middle East. In the West Bank village where Tlaib’s mother was born, residents are greeting the news with a mixture of pride and hope that she will take on a U.S. administration widely seen as hostile to the Palestinian cause. (AP Photo/Nasser Nasser)
Rep. Rashida Tlaib, D-Mich., speaks at a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 17, 2019, to unveil the "Immediate Financial Relief for Federal Employees Act" bill which would give zero interest loans for up to $6,000 to employees impacted by the government shutdown and any future shutdowns. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
No number of opponent signs can wipe our smiles of hope.
Rep. Rashida Tlaib, D-Mich., questions Michael Cohen, President Donald Trump's former lawyer, as he testifies before the House Oversight and Reform Committee, on Capitol Hill, Wednesday, Feb. 27, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., left, and Rep. Rashida Tlaib, D-Mich., right, laugh as they wait for other freshman Congressmen to deliver a letter calling to an end to the government shutdown to deliver to the office of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky., on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2019. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
Just voted with my son Adam. #MakingHistoryTogether
So Yousif came with me to one of our senior luncheons and we met Mother Williams who turned 104 years old (MashAllah). Yousif turns to me and says, "I thought you died at 100." Everyone laughed. I love being with the people I will fight and serve in Congress.
Eid Mubarak from my family to yours. @adamtlaib @fayez492
A beautiful day...so excited. #2days volunteer at www.rashidaforcongress.com
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"But, however, we have a course that we have to stick to, and nothing I should say should distract us from that," she said. "The [partial government] shutdown has to be at the forefront."

Prominent Democrats put distance between themselves and Tlaib's comments, though many pointed out that her words were no worse than remarks made by the president himself, who called a porn star alleging an affair with him "horseface," nicknamed Democratic Rep. Adam Schiff of California "little Adam Schitt," and, most infamously, saying in a 2005 "Access Hollywood" recording that he could "grab" women "by the p----."

On impeachment, Democrats have said they are waiting for special counsel Robert Mueller to wrap up his investigation before any further determinations are made.

Speaking with NBC's "Meet the Press" on Sunday, House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer of Maryland said he believes any discussion of impeachment at the moment is a "distraction."

"We'll have to see what the Mueller report says," he said.

On Friday, Trump responded to Tlaib's comments, saying he thought "she dishonored herself and her family using language like that in front of her son and whoever else was there."

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